Tag Archive: heart disease RSS

Farish Fund Supports Collaboration to Study Plaques That Cause Most Heart Attacks

The William Stamps Farish Fund in Houston has donated $400,000 to a collaboration between the the Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences (ICES) at The University of Texas at Austin and the Texas Heart Institute (THI) in Houston to study life-threatening vulnerable plaques, the cause of at least two-thirds of all heart attacks, and new…   » Continue Reading

Technologies Developed in Texas Help Make the ‘Engineering’ of Complex Tissues and Organs Feasible

In this talk, Dr. Doris A. Taylor will discuss the discovery and application of new knowledge and technologies to improve patient care and to prevent cardiovascular disease. She will share how building new cell- and organ-based solutions for severe diseases could affect millions of patients who suffer from or who are at risk for these diseases. Taylor is working to “engineer” cardiac muscle, valves and vasculature, with many of these technologies now progressing to first-in-human use trials.

New Ability to Regrow Blood Vessels Holds Promise for Treatment of Heart Disease

New Ability to Regrow Blood Vessels Holds Promise for Treatment of Heart Disease

University of Texas at Austin researchers have demonstrated a new and more effective method for regrowing blood vessels in the heart and limbs — a research advancement that could have major implications for how we treat heart disease, the leading cause of death in the Western world.

Two Renowned Cardiovascular Experts Join University’s Computational Institute

Two internationally recognized experts in the use of computer modeling and simulation to address heart disease and other complex health problems are joining The University of Texas at Austin’s faculty to help advance the university as a national leader in biomedicine.

Saliva Can Help Diagnose Heart Attack, Study Shows

Saliva Can Help Diagnose Heart Attack, Study Shows

Early diagnosis of a heart attack may now be possible using only a few drops of saliva and a new nano-bio-chip, a multi-institutional team led by researchers at The University of Texas at Austin reported at a recent meeting of the American Association for Dental Research.