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Common Antifungal Drug Decreases Tumor Growth and Shows Promise as Cancer Therapy

Common Antifungal Drug Decreases Tumor Growth and Shows Promise as Cancer Therapy

An inexpensive antifungal drug, thiabendazole, slows tumor growth and shows promise as a chemotherapy for cancer. Scientists in the College of Natural Sciences at The University of Texas at Austin made this discovery by exploiting the evolutionary relatedness of yeast, frogs, mice and humans.

Research of Cell Movements in Developing Frogs Reveals New Twists in Human Genetic Disease

Mutations in a gene known as "Fritz" may be responsible for causing human genetic disorders such as Bardet-Biedl syndrome, University of Texas at Austin developmental biologist John Wallingford and Duke University human geneticist and cell biologist Nicholas Katsanis have found.

Scientists Find New Genes for Cancer, Other Diseases in Plants, Yeast and Worms

From deep within the genomes of organisms as diverse as plants, worms and yeast, scientists have uncovered new genes responsible for causing human diseases such as cancer and deafness.

Scientist and surgeon work with Dell Pediatric Research Institute to reduce spinal defects

Scientist and surgeon work with Dell Pediatric Research Institute to reduce spinal defects

Teaming Up Against Birth Defects: John Wallingford and Tim George work at different ends of the biomedical-health-care spectrum. Wallingford is a scientist doing basic research at The University of Texas at Austin. Using frogs and mice as models, he studies how embryos develop and what can go wrong in development. George is a pediatric neurosurgeon at Dell Children's Medical Center. Among his patients are children with birth defects.

Two Young University of Texas at Austin Biologists Receive Six Years of Research Funding from Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Two Young University of Texas at Austin Biologists Receive Six Years of Research Funding from Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Two University of Texas at Austin biologists join 50 of the nation's best early career science faculty to focus on their boldest and potentially transformative research ideas with support from a new initiative from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI).