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Study Shows Jim Crow-Era Segregation Persists in Texas Schools

A first-of-its-kind study from researchers in the College of Education at The University of Texas at Austin shows that, in addition to being isolated by race/ethnicity and socioeconomic status, English language learners in Texas schools also are separated by language, suffering what has been termed “triple segregation.” Education professors Julian Vasquez Heilig and Jennifer Jellison…   » Continue Reading

Education Leaders to Discuss How Public Schools Can Do More With Less

The College of Education's Institute for Public School Initiatives (IPSI) and the Austin-based Institute for Productivity in Education (IPE) will host the forum "Improving Productivity in Public Education" on Jan. 16. The forum, now in its third year, provides an opportunity for national education leaders to convene and share the latest efficiency-in-education data, research and ideas.

LBJ School of Public Affairs to Generate First Texas Statewide Measure of Teacher Effectiveness

The Texas Education Agency (TEA) has contracted with The University of Texas at Austin’s Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs to develop a comprehensive metric that measures a teacher’s effect on student achievement under the direction of the school’s Project on Educator Effectiveness and Quality (PEEQ).

Dropout Reduction and Jobs Program Developed by University of Texas at Austin School of Social Work Student Funded for Eastside Memorial High School

A job-training/dropout reduction program developed by a University of Texas at Austin School of Social Work student for the Austin Independent School District has been awarded a $250,000 grant by the Texas Education Agency.

Cool lessons in hot science delivered by new education symposium

Cool lessons in hot science delivered by new education symposium

Not Your Mama's Science Class: Back when boomers were driving Pinto hatchbacks to Friday night football games and rocking out to Led Zeppelin on the eight-track, it wasn't cool to like science and math. If you loved physics and others got wind of it, you could suffer for your passion.