Question 2

As a health care worker you are responsible:
A. To know the potential hazards in your work area
B. To observe signs:  take precautions
C. To know what's inside containers before you use them
D. All of the above.

You are correct!!!
Rationale

IN CASE OF SPILLS...

1.  ACT QUICKLY
Clean up small spills immediately, using proper safety methods and disinfectants. Report large spills and leave cleanup to trained personnel.
2.  WEAR PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT
Spills involving infectious organisms or chemicals may require masks, gloves, and gowns. 
3.  CONTAIN THE SPILL
Approved absorbents, neutralizing chemicals and special containers may be needed to clean up a spill or leak. The area should be blocked off.
4.  NOTIFY PROPER PERSONNEL
In the event of a spill, contact the proper person or department.  Keep phone numbers handy.

TYPES OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS
Here are some of the hazardous substances health-care workers may use or be exposed to each day. 
INFECTIOUS SUBSTANCES
Some infectious substances (such as viruses) can be transmitted by blood and other body fluids, equipment, containers, paper goods, glassware, linens and by people.
FLAMMABLE LIQUIDS AND GASES
For example, chemicals, such as ether or alcohol, can burn or explode.
RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS
These require special handling techniques to prevent exposure to personnel and visitors.
TOXIC CHEMICALS
A person may be exposed over a long period of time before effects are noticed.
 
As a health care worker you are repsonsible to:
1. Know the potential Hazards in each area of the facility where you work.
2. Observe signs, and take precautions when entering an area identified as hazardous.
3. Know what’s inside a container before you handle it.

Waste Management
SHARPS - any items that are capable of piercing your skin (needles, scissors, broken or breakable glass, scalpels etc...).
* These items must be placed in a sharps container designed for safe disposal.
* Sharps Containers must never be allowed to become more than 1/2 full before replacing!!!!!
* Both Nursing and Housekeeping should monitor sharps containers to prevent them from getting too full.
* Housekeeping can be contacted to replace a 1/2 full container.

TRANSPORTING SPECIMENS
* Under no circumstances are patient specimens (urine, blood, tissues, etc...) to be put in the main hospital tube system to be transported to the laboratory.
* These specimens should be carried by hand in a sealed, labeled specimen bag.

TRASH
* Trash soiled with blood, body fluids, and or tissues must be disposed of in a red biohazard trash bag or container, if it is likely that the substances may come out (drip or be squeezed out).
* Trash that effectively contains hazardous materials (no dripping, oozing … body fluids remains contained in the trash - like urine in a diaper), may be thrown away in the regular trash.

SPILLS
* Any blood or body fluid should be handled using appropriate PPE’s to prevent the health care worker from coming into direct contact with the substance while cleaning it up.
* Spills involving hazardous materials other than patient substances (chemicals, mercury etc...) should be contained and Plant Operations contacted for clean up.

USED PPE’S
* Should be considered contaminated.
* When removing these items (masks, gloves, gowns etc...), use caution to not contaminate your clothing or your skin.
* Always remember to wash your hands after removing such items.

Continue Test ---->

You are Incorrect!!! Try Again!
Rationale

IN CASE OF SPILLS...

1.  ACT QUICKLY
Clean up small spills immediately, using proper safety methods and disinfectants. Report large spills and leave cleanup to trained personnel.
2.  WEAR PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT
Spills involving infectious organisms or chemicals may require masks, gloves, and gowns. 
3.  CONTAIN THE SPILL
Approved absorbents, neutralizing chemicals and special containers may be needed to clean up a spill or leak. The area should be blocked off.
4.  NOTIFY PROPER PERSONNEL
In the event of a spill, contact the proper person or department.  Keep phone numbers handy.

TYPES OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS
Here are some of the hazardous substances health-care workers may use or be exposed to each day. 
INFECTIOUS SUBSTANCES
Some infectious substances (such as viruses) can be transmitted by blood and other body fluids, equipment, containers, paper goods, glassware, linens and by people.
FLAMMABLE LIQUIDS AND GASES
For example, chemicals, such as ether or alcohol, can burn or explode.
RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS
These require special handling techniques to prevent exposure to personnel and visitors.
TOXIC CHEMICALS
A person may be exposed over a long period of time before effects are noticed.
 
As a health care worker you are repsonsible to:
1. Know the potential Hazards in each area of the facility where you work.
2. Observe signs, and take precautions when entering an area identified as hazardous.
3. Know what’s inside a container before you handle it.

Waste Management
SHARPS - any items that are capable of piercing your skin (needles, scissors, broken or breakable glass, scalpels etc...).
* These items must be placed in a sharps container designed for safe disposal.
* Sharps Containers must never be allowed to become more than 1/2 full before replacing!!!!!
* Both Nursing and Housekeeping should monitor sharps containers to prevent them from getting too full.
* Housekeeping can be contacted to replace a 1/2 full container.

TRANSPORTING SPECIMENS
* Under no circumstances are patient specimens (urine, blood, tissues, etc...) to be put in the main hospital tube system to be transported to the laboratory.
* These specimens should be carried by hand in a sealed, labeled specimen bag.

TRASH
* Trash soiled with blood, body fluids, and or tissues must be disposed of in a red biohazard trash bag or container, if it is likely that the substances may come out (drip or be squeezed out).
* Trash that effectively contains hazardous materials (no dripping, oozing … body fluids remains contained in the trash - like urine in a diaper), may be thrown away in the regular trash.

SPILLS
* Any blood or body fluid should be handled using appropriate PPE’s to prevent the health care worker from coming into direct contact with the substance while cleaning it up.
* Spills involving hazardous materials other than patient substances (chemicals, mercury etc...) should be contained and Plant Operations contacted for clean up.

USED PPE’S
* Should be considered contaminated.
* When removing these items (masks, gloves, gowns etc...), use caution to not contaminate your clothing or your skin.
* Always remember to wash your hands after removing such items.