University of Texas at Austin

Archive for January, 2009


Friday, January 16, 2009

Hormone headlines

Kristina Durante

Kristina Durante

The research paper from Kristina Durante, a Ph.D. student, and her adviser, Dr. Norman Li, assistant professor of psychology, published this week snagged press attention around the world.

It’s no wonder it did. It involves women and men, hormones and sex and infidelity.

Here’s the top of the press release from The University of Texas at Austin:

Women with high levels of the sex hormone oestradiol may engage in opportunistic mating, according to a new study by psychology researchers at The University
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Tuesday, January 13, 2009

Recognizing Hackerman

Norman Hackerman

Norman Hackerman

To follow up on the news that the newest science building at The University of Texas at Austin will be named for Norman Hackerman, here is a link to a story we wrote about him several years ago.

In the story, Larry Faulkner, former president of the university, called Hackerman the most important figure in science in Texas because he laid much of the foundation for science in the state.

The Hackerman building is on the site of the Experimental Science Building, which
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Monday, January 12, 2009

Physics in a petri dish

Harry Swinney

Harry Swinney

The latest research paper from Harry Swinney, a physics professor at The University of Texas at Austin, is on bacteria. The experiment, on which the paper in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science is based, took place in a Petri dish of agar.

Physics and bacteria? That’s not a combination that goes together like McCoy and Cosby, fish and chips or public television and pledge drives.

But there is a connection, said Swinney, the Sid Richardson Foundation Regents Chair in
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Wednesday, January 7, 2009

Math prizes add up

Luis Caffarelli

Luis Caffarelli

Luis Caffarelli has become the second mathematician from The University of Texas at Austin in two years to receive a Leroy P. Steele Prize from the American Mathematical Society (AMS). The Steele Prize is considered one of the top three prizes in mathematics.

The Steele Prize is actually three awards. Caffarelli’s was for lifetime achievement, the award that John Tate, a math professor, won in 1995. The university’s Karen Uhlenbeck received the prize for seminal research contribution in 2007.

The other Steele Prize
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Monday, January 5, 2009

Profiled by Science

Science magazine has written a two-page profile of Zack Booth Simpson, a research scientist in the Institute for Cellular and Molecular Biology (ICMB).

The story details Simpson’s unusual entry into academic science and his contributions to the laboratories of professors Edward Marcotte, Andy Ellington and Ken Johnson in ICMB and John Davis in electrical and computer engineering. He was involved with the bacterial photography project that appeared in the journal Nature in 2005.

Besides working in the ICMB, Simpson, 38, is involved with Mine
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