University of Texas at Austin

Archive for May, 2009


Friday, May 29, 2009

Spring 2009 discoveries revisited

The spring 2009 semester has ended and that’s a good time to take another look at some of the research that came out of University of Texas at Austin labs in the past few months.

Here’s a roundup of some of the more interesting discoveries in exercise, psychology, business and statistics.

Add crunch to your post workout recovery

In a study of well-trained cyclists, exercise physiologist Lynne Kammer found that a bowl of whole grain cereal is as good as a sports drink
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Thursday, May 28, 2009

Reading ahead: Mexico City kidnappings

Ricardo Ainslie

Ricardo Ainslie

Kay Randall writes about a documentary film that Ricardo Ainslie, an educational psychology professor, made about an epidemic of kidnappings in his hometown, Mexico City in the feature story that will be posted Monday on the university’s main Web page.

Here’s the top of the story:

This isn’t fiction and these aren’t actors. The torture is real.

The film is “¡Ya Basta!” (”Enough!”), and it’s a disturbing, intimate documentary of an epidemic of kidnappings and related crimes that started in
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Friday, May 22, 2009

Covering the over and under

Richard Matzner, digs black holes

Richard Matzner, digs black holes

[caption id="attachment_585" align="alignright" width="300" caption="Pablo Munguia, digs pen shell clams"]Pablo Munguia, digs pen shell clams[/caption]Today, Further Findings points readers to two research stories–one in outer space and the other under the sea–posted elsewhere on The University of Texas at Austin Web site.

Aaron Dubrow, the science writer at the Texas Advanced Computing Center (TACC), writes about the research of Richard Matzner, an astrophysicist at the university.

Matzner uses TACC’s Ranger supercomputer to simulate binary black hole mergers and search for gravitational waves. The waves were
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Friday, May 15, 2009

Getting Started–Michael Starbird

Michael Starbird

Michael Starbird

As part of Further Findings’ Getting Started series, Michael Starbird, a mathematics professor at The University of Texas at Austin, explains how he got involved with numbers.

“I was brought up in southern California and my father taught mathematics, physics and astronomy at a community college and he would bring mathematical and physics problems to the dinner table,” he said. “My brother and I talked about them.

“Mathematics was just a part of daily life. In fact, I often look back
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Tuesday, May 5, 2009

Code Crackers

Linda Schele

Linda Schele

[caption id="attachment_536" align="alignright" width="175" caption="David Stuart"]David Stuart[/caption]Two University of Texas at Austin researchers are prominently featured in “Cracking the Maya Code,” an episode of Nova on PBS. The episode, first aired in April 2008, is rebroadcast at 7 p.m. May 5 on KLRU. It also is available online at Hulu.com.

David Stuart\'s Take Five video

The program follows the efforts of archeologists who for more than a century tried to figure out the meaning of symbols, called glyphs, inscribed in Maya ruins
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