University of Texas at Austin

Archive for July, 2009


Monday, July 27, 2009

More on skin cancer probe

While KEYE-Channel 42 interviewed Prof. James Tunnell about his optical skin cancer probe, Further Findings also had video equipment rolling.

Here is a clip of Tunnell explaining how the probe might work.

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Tuesday, July 21, 2009

Skin cancer probe featured on KEYE

Ron Oliveira and James Tunnell

Ron Oliveira and James Tunnell

The skin cancer probe being developed in James Tunnell’s lab was featured on KEYE-TV-Channel 42 on the 10 p.m. newscast on July 20, 2009. KEYE’s Ron Oliveira went to Tunnell’s lab in the Biomedical Engineering building to interview Tunnell and Naras Rajaran, one of the graduate students working on the project.

See the video from KEYE.

The optical probe is designed to determine of a spot on the skin is benign or cancerous. If it’s not benign, the spot
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Monday, July 20, 2009

Going mobile in meetings

Jenn Davis and Keri Stephens

Jenn Davis and Keri Stephens

Keri Stephens, an assistant professor of communications studies, is in the midst of a research project investigating how people in organizations—businesses, nonprofits, schools and others—use cell phones, smart phones, pagers and similar devices.

Her first results show that when people use their devices in meetings they do so because they see other people doing it. Or if others aren’t using the devices, they won’t either.

Going in, Stephens and her co-author Jenn Davis thought that people were texting and
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Thursday, July 16, 2009

Omega-3s are good for fish, too

People who get a healthy dose of omega-3 fatty acids in their diets may have a reduced risk of heart disease, high blood pressure and strokes, and fish are a major source of these fatty acids. But what good are omega-3s to the fish?

Omega-3s may give young fish the boost they need to dart away from predators, leading to greater survival of the vulnerable larvae and potentially larger populations of adults.

Read more at the College of Natural Sciences.


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Tuesday, July 14, 2009

Time Travel: Stone Age ax to a giant leap

To mark the 40th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing, Further Findings is highlighting ways The University of Texas at Austin and its people touched or were touched by the mission. Know of others? Let us know.

Michael Collins, Texas archeologist

Michael Collins, Texas archeologist

Michael Collins, an archeologist at The University of Texas at Austin, was a graduate student in archeology at the University of Arizona in 1969.

In July of that year, he was on a dig at the Tabun Cave in Israel, south
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Friday, July 10, 2009

How Glen Evans settled the dustup over moon dust

To mark the 40th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing, Further Findings is highlighting ways The University of Texas at Austin and its people touched or were touched by the mission. Know of others? Let us know.

Glen EvansThe moon is covered with a layer of dust. NASA scientists and engineers knew that much.

But there was a hot debate about the depth of the dust.

The thin dusters thought there was a thin layer of dust that would not interfere with the
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Wednesday, July 8, 2009

I can hear you now

Nace Golding

Nace Golding

This story is from the College of Natural Sciences and was written by Daniel Oppenheimer.

The human ability to know roughly where in space a sound is coming from is so integral to our experience of the world that it’s basically invisible. A friend calls out our name, and we turn to the left, or turn to the right, and there they are.

Yet that ability, which seems so simple, not only depends on neurons in our brain that are exceptionally
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Thursday, July 2, 2009

Apollo 11 and the Texas laser rangers

To mark the 40th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing, Further Findings is highlighting ways The University of Texas at Austin and its people touched or were touched by the mission. Know of others? Let us know.

Peter Shelus was visiting The University of Texas at Austin campus in 1971, attending an astronomy conference. More important, he was looking for a job.

He was completing a post-doc assignment at the Manned Space Center (now Johnson Space Center) in Houston and job
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Wednesday, July 1, 2009

MCC “signs” off for the last time

The research consortium known as MCC died a long time ago, though it was the spark that fueled Austin’s rise as a technology center. Now the last visible reminders of the company are being removed.

The name of the company’s former headquarters building is being changed from the MCC building to the West Pickle Research building. It’s at 3525 W. Braker Lane, across MoPac Boulevard from the main Pickle Research Campus.

The new name reflects the building’s ownership by The University of
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