University of Texas at Austin

Archive for July, 2010


Wednesday, July 28, 2010

Simulating how the Earth works deep down

Several members of the Mantle Convection PetaApps project: Omar Ghattas, Lucas Wilcox, Carsten Burstedde, Georg Stadler, all of The University of Texas at Austin, and Michael Gurnis of Caltech.

Several members of the Mantle Convection PetaApps project: Omar Ghattas, Lucas Wilcox, Carsten Burstedde, Georg Stadler, all of The University of Texas at Austin, and Michael Gurnis of Caltech.

Plate tectonics was a revolutionary theory at one time. But over the years, it was accepted to explain the movements of the Earth that pulls continents apart and shoves them together.

An interdisciplinary and multi-institutional team of scientists is trying to understand how these plates move by creating the most detailed simulation of
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Monday, July 26, 2010

Would you give it up for the group?

Jessica Sinn of the College of Liberal Arts writes about Prof. William Swann’s research in identity fusion.

Dr. William Swann

Dr. William Swann

Imagine a runaway trolley hurtling down the tracks toward a handful of people. If it continues on its course, it will kill the group of innocent bystanders. You’re given two options to save the day: throw a switch and kill only one person, or sacrifice your own life by leaping in front of the trolley. What would you do?

In a study, to
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Thursday, July 22, 2010

Time Scales: That was fast, really fast

Aaron Bernstein

Aaron Bernstein

Further Findings talked to several researchers at The University of Texas at Austin about the time scales in which they work, ranging from millions and billions of years to fractions of a second.

Aaron Bernstein is a laser physicist and associate director of the High Intensity Laser Group. The group operates the Texas Petawatt Laser.

In explaining the time scales involved in his research, Bernstein sounds like a question on the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT).

Bernstein works with lasers that blast pulses
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Friday, July 16, 2010

The university has an app for that

You could call it The University of Texas at Austin’s app store.

Bugao Xu developed a way to make a three dimensional body scan.

Bugao Xu developed a way to make a three dimensional body scan.

It’s the list of technologies developed by university researchers that are available for commercialization.

Want to give a drop of blood to see if you have cancer? There’s an app for that.

Want a three dimensional scan of your body? Hey, there’s an app for that.

Want to speed up the growth of your tomatoes? There’s an app for that.

Need a flexible e-reader or
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Monday, July 12, 2010

GRACE gets extension and noticed

graceThe Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) mission is included in a recent article on the Environment 360 Web site as one of the crucial ways scientists are keeping track of changes in the Earth’s climate from space.

GRACE is a twin-satellite array that measures changes in gravity around the world. Scores of scientists have used data collected by the satellites to track changes ranging from Greenland’s and Antarctica’s ice sheets to the amount of water in California’s aquifers.

Engineering Professor Byron Tapley of The
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Thursday, July 1, 2010

Time Scales: A billion years? That’s so yesterday

Recent, for Sharon Mosher, is just a billion years ago.

Recent, for Sharon Mosher, is just a billion years ago.

Further Findings talked to several researchers at The University of Texas at Austin about the time scales in which they work, ranging from millions and billions of years to fractions of a second.

Sharon Mosher, a geologist and dean of the Jackson School of Geosciences, talks about working in geologic time.

Sharon Mosher explains what she does as a geologist:

“I’m a structural geologist and I tackle tectonic problems,” she says. “I study everything from
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