University of Texas at Austin

Archive for May, 2011


Monday, May 30, 2011

Got it in writing: A surprising Bronze Age discovery

Greek scholar Cynthia Shelmerdine said the clay tablet with writing from the Late Bronze Age is the most exciting find of her career, hands down.

Greek scholar Cynthia Shelmerdine said the clay tablet with writing from the Late Bronze Age is the most exciting find of her career, hands down.

Listening to Cynthia Shelmerdine describe the writing on a Greek tablet from more than 3,000 years ago, it’s like she was looking over the scribe’s shoulder as he worked.

She points out details and nuance of technique, the condition of the tablet and what it means, literally, and for the world of Greek archaeology.

“Notice how the signs
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Wednesday, May 25, 2011

Bridging the Longevity Gap: Sociologists Seek to Increase Life Expectancies for African Americans, Hispanics

Jessica Sinn, a member of the communications staff of the College of Liberal Arts at The University of Texas at Austin, wrote this post about Prof. Robert Hummer’s research into disparities in life expectancies between racial groups in the United States.

“Five years might seem like a modest gap, but lives are being lost prematurely and not in a color-blind fashion,” says sociologist Robert Hummer about life expectancy differences between white and blacks in the United States.

“Five years might seem like a modest gap, but lives are being lost prematurely and not in a color-blind fashion,” says sociologist Robert Hummer about life expectancy differences between white and blacks in the United States.

Thanks to improvements in education,
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Monday, May 23, 2011

How changing the world got started

In remarks at a panel on the research mission of universities, Dr. J. Tinsley Oden showed this sampling of the research going on at the Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences at The University of Texas at Austin. It ranges from predicting the paths of hurricanes to laser surgery on cancer cells.

In remarks at a panel on the research mission of universities, Dr. J. Tinsley Oden showed this sampling of research going on at the Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences at The University of Texas at Austin. It ranges from predicting the paths of hurricanes to laser surgery on cancer cells.

Dr. J. Tinsley Oden, director of the Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences at The University of Texas at Austin, highlighted the development of universities as research institutions in this remarks. He
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Tuesday, May 17, 2011

Developing a diagnostic device

Brian Zaccheo with his sensor for acute pancreatitis.

Brian Zaccheo with his sensor for acute pancreatitis.

When Brian Zaccheo designed a low-cost, self-powered diagnostic device for acute pancreatitis, he combined skills from his undergraduate training in biochemistry with the analytical chemistry expertise in the laboratory of his adviser, Prof. Richard Crooks.

But he added another element to the mix: business sense.

The result is a device that can be made cheaply with ingredients such as milk protein, gelatin, aluminum foil and LED lights.

It works quickly. Place a sample on the device
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Friday, May 13, 2011

Carbon “sponge” could charge supercapacitors

University of Texas at Austin collaborators Meryl Stoller, Dr. Yanwu Zhu and Dr. Rodney Ruoff stand with a 3-D model of the new carbon material they have created.

University of Texas at Austin collaborators Meryl Stoller, Dr. Yanwu Zhu and Dr. Rodney Ruoff stand with a 3-D model of the new carbon material they have created.

Researchers at The University of Texas at Austin’s have created a new porous, three-dimensional carbon that can be used as a greatly enhanced supercapacitor, holding promise for energy storage in everything from energy grids and electric cars to consumer electronics.

The significance of the discovery is the potential it offers for enabling supercapacitors to
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