University of Texas at Austin

Archive for July, 2011


Thursday, July 21, 2011

Getting Started: Researcher tunes into indigenous language

In the Getting Started series, Further Findings highlights the paths some researchers at The University of Texas at Austin took to the laboratory, the library, the field—wherever they do their work.

This post originated on the College of Liberal Arts Web site. It was written by Katherine Thayer.

"I am excited about this project because it brings together the personal and the academic," says Luis Cárcamo-Huechante about his research into the Mapuche language.

The inspiration for Luis Cárcamo-Huechante’s current research project lies in a moment from his childhood in Tralcao, a rural village in southern Chile, in the 1970’s.

“I used to listen to the radio after 8
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Thursday, July 14, 2011

Engineering better reconstructive surgery results

Computer simulations "provide patients with a realistic picture of what they would look like after their surgery and are constrained by what is actually surgically possible," said biomedical engineer Mia Markey.Computer simulations “provide patients with a realistic picture of what they would look like after their surgery and are constrained by what is actually surgically possible,” said biomedical engineer Mia Markey. Photo by Melissa Mixon.

This story was first published on the Cockrell School of Engineering Web site. It was written by Melissa Mixon.

Faculty and students at the Cockrell School of Engineering are developing ways for cancer patients and children born with facial deformities to make more informed decisions about which
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Monday, July 11, 2011

A new model of YOUR blood flow

For a professor in the Department of Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics, spending time crunching numbers is leading to technologies that could save lives.

Thomas Hughes is developing three dimensional models of blood flow of individual patients.

Thomas Hughes is developing three dimensional models of blood flow of individual patients.

Dr. Thomas Hughes and his colleagues have pioneered patient-specific 3-D models of blood flow through the heart and blood vessels that could help guide best practices for cardiologists.

Rather than relying on earlier computer models — where simple two-dimensional geometry shared little resemblance to actual anatomy —
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