University of Texas at Austin

Archive for the ‘Arts’ Category


Wednesday, November 3, 2010

Music and learning: Hey, baby, they’re playing your song

Eugenia Costa-Giomi. Photo by Marsha Miller

Eugenia Costa-Giomi. Photo by Marsha Miller

Music Professor Eugenia Costa-Giomi gave me a test that she gives to infants as part of her musical cognition research.

Infants pass the test. I failed.

The consolation was that most other adults fail, too.

The test is to watch and listen to alternating videos of two young women singing two different melodies, which are Bach minuets. In the first set of videos, one woman sings one melody and the other sings another melody.

In the second set, things
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Tuesday, September 14, 2010

Ransom Center opens David Foster Wallace archive

Books from David Foster Wallace’s library. Photo by Anthony Maddaloni.

Books from David Foster Wallace’s library. Photo by Anthony Maddaloni.

The Harry Ransom Center opened the archives of writer David Foster Wallace on Tuesday (Sept. 13, 2010).

As part of the opening, the HRC has posted several pieces from the collection online.

Also, Jacqueline Muñoz, librarian at the Ransom Center who cataloged more than 300 books from Wallace’s archive, writes about her experience working with the collection and her personal response to his work.

Here’s part of her post:

“He didn’t merely own these books; he digested
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Thursday, September 9, 2010

The lowdown on Scartlett’s green dress

curtain_small1It would have been a good story if the curtains that Scarlett O’Hara ripped down in “Gone with the Wind” had been used to make her famous curtain dress, which is housed at the Harry Ransom Center.

But, alas, that’s not the case.

Hoping for a further finding, Further Findings put that question to Steve Wilson, the film curator at the Harry Ransom Center. The dress and 5,000 boxes of other materials from the second-best movie made in 1939 (my pick is
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Tuesday, April 27, 2010

Evolutionary research connections here and there

Edward Marcotte

Edward Marcotte

John Wallingford

John Wallingford

Research conducted by University of Texas at Austin professors Edward Marcotte and John Wallingford is featured in this week’s edition (April 27, 2010) of Science Times in the New York Times.

Marcotte, in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, and Wallingford, in the Section of Molecular Cell and Developmental Biology, found genes in the genomes of organisms as diverse as plants, worms and yeast that are responsible for causing human diseases such as cancer and deafness.

In yeast, for example, they
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Thursday, May 28, 2009

Reading ahead: Mexico City kidnappings

Ricardo Ainslie

Ricardo Ainslie

Kay Randall writes about a documentary film that Ricardo Ainslie, an educational psychology professor, made about an epidemic of kidnappings in his hometown, Mexico City in the feature story that will be posted Monday on the university’s main Web page.

Here’s the top of the story:

This isn’t fiction and these aren’t actors. The torture is real.

The film is “¡Ya Basta!” (”Enough!”), and it’s a disturbing, intimate documentary of an epidemic of kidnappings and related crimes that started in
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Tuesday, May 5, 2009

Code Crackers

Linda Schele

Linda Schele

[caption id="attachment_536" align="alignright" width="175" caption="David Stuart"]David Stuart[/caption]Two University of Texas at Austin researchers are prominently featured in “Cracking the Maya Code,” an episode of Nova on PBS. The episode, first aired in April 2008, is rebroadcast at 7 p.m. May 5 on KLRU. It also is available online at Hulu.com.

David Stuart\'s Take Five video

The program follows the efforts of archeologists who for more than a century tried to figure out the meaning of symbols, called glyphs, inscribed in Maya ruins
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Thursday, April 30, 2009

Props for De Niro’s props

We thought there might be an item that stood out in the 1,300 boxes or so of papers, film, movie props and costumes that Robert De Niro donated to the Harry Ransom Center at The University of Texas at Austin.

We asked curators of collection, which has just been opened to researchers and the public, if they came across anything that was pretty darned cool.

From Robert De Niro? An actor known for his preparation, focus and intensity? Are you talkin’ to me?

How
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