University of Texas at Austin

Archive for the ‘biomedical’ Category


Thursday, August 8, 2013

UT Austin researchers develop cancer therapy that slows tumor growth

Researchers at The University of Texas at Austin have developed a combination of therapies that significantly reduced the rate and size at which human tumors grow in mice.

In mice treated with the combined therapy, tumors took more than 70 days on average to grow as large as they grew in 50 days in mice treated with the next most effective therapy, the researchers reported in a paper published in the journal Molecular Carcinogenesis.

Karen Vasquez, a researcher in the College of Pharmacy.

Karen Vasquez, a researcher in the College of
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Thursday, February 21, 2013

Engineering immune cells to resist infection from HIV

Researchers at The University of Texas at Austin and the Stanford University School of Medicine have found a novel way to engineer key cells of the immune system so they remain resistant to infection from HIV, the virus that causes AIDS.
The study, which was published this week in Molecular Therapy, describes the use of a kind of molecular scissors to cut and paste a series of HIV-resistant genes into T cells, specialized immune cells targeted by the virus.

The new approach
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Monday, October 1, 2012

Bench to Bedside: Translational Science

Pictured are Kelly Daniels, Christopher Frei, assistant professor, and Julieta Scalo

Pictured are Kelly Daniels, Christopher Frei, assistant professor, and Julieta Scalo

It takes an average of 24 years for a discovery in a scientist’s laboratory to become a medication at a patient’s bedside.

To speed up that process, the College of Pharmacy at The University of Texas at Austin and three other University of Texas System institutions have begun a Translational Science Ph.D. program to spur communication between the basic scientist and the physician and points in between.

“This program will lead to well-trained
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Friday, June 22, 2012

Research Roundup: Spring 2012

We’ve rounded up some of the research highlights of the spring 2012 semester at The University of Texas at Austin.

utresearch_fb5One piece of news, growing support for a medical school at the university, isn’t exactly current research, but it could lead to vast research opportunities in health and medicine for years to come.

Noteworthy research included authoritative reports on the process of hydro-fracturing in mining natural gas, water resources in the important food-producing regions of California’s Central Valley and the Great Plains,
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Saturday, December 24, 2011

Research Round Up Fall 2011: New planets, a bigger black hole, more effective solar cells and more

It seems that the only time astronomers at The University of Texas at Austin took a break from finding new planets and bigger black holes during the fall 2011 semester was when university geologists edged in with evidence of a lake under the surface of Saturn’s moon, Europa.

As busy as those researchers were, the semester also brought discoveries in green energy, Parkinson’s disease, post-traumatic stress disorder, concealed handguns and the relationship between children’s happiness and their parents.

Here’s a look at
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Wednesday, November 30, 2011

Texas collaboration started with lunch in Wisconsin

Adela Ben-Yakar, an engineering professor, and Jon Pierce-Shimomura, a neurobiology professor, have teamed up develop technology to test drugs for neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's.

Adela Ben-Yakar, an engineering professor, and Jon Pierce-Shimomura, a neurobiology professor, have teamed up to develop technology to test drugs for neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s.

Scientific collaborations across disciplines can be great when they happen.

Researchers bring different skills, expertise and perspectives that can illuminate hard problems.

But just bringing different disciplines together can be a hard problem in itself, despite work being done by universities to break down the siloes that contain them.

So we wondered how Adela Ben-Yakar, a professor in the
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Tuesday, October 18, 2011

Engineer, biologist team up to reverse aging

Cockrell School of Engineering Associate Professor Adela Ben-Yakar and College of Natural Sciences Assistant Professor Jon Pierce-Shimomura received a competitive $3 million grant from the National Institutes of Health. The grant will fund research that aims to prevent degeneration of the nervous system, which occurs through natural aging and diseases like Alzheimer's. Photo by Marsha Miller

Cockrell School of Engineering Associate Professor Adela Ben-Yakar and College of Natural Sciences Assistant Professor Jon Pierce-Shimomura received a competitive $3 million grant from the National Institutes of Health. The grant will fund research that aims to prevent degeneration of the nervous system, which occurs through natural aging and diseases like Alzheimer’s. Photo by Marsha Miller

This article originally appeared on the Cockrell School of Engineering Web site. It was written by Melissa Mixon.

Technology developed by researchers at The University of
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Thursday, September 22, 2011

The image of cancer

There are more than 1.2 million cases of skin cancer in the United States each year.

Biomedical engineers at The University of Texas at Austin have developed a device that could reduce the need for biopsies that are performed to determine whether a growth is cancerous.

James Tunnell and his student researchers developed a pen-sized, light-based device for detecting skin cancers.

James Tunnell and his student researchers developed a pen-sized, light-based device for detecting skin cancers.

For every melanoma found, doctors perform approximately 50 biopsies. As a result, healthcare providers spend billions of dollars per year taking
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Thursday, July 14, 2011

Engineering better reconstructive surgery results

Computer simulations "provide patients with a realistic picture of what they would look like after their surgery and are constrained by what is actually surgically possible," said biomedical engineer Mia Markey.Computer simulations “provide patients with a realistic picture of what they would look like after their surgery and are constrained by what is actually surgically possible,” said biomedical engineer Mia Markey. Photo by Melissa Mixon.

This story was first published on the Cockrell School of Engineering Web site. It was written by Melissa Mixon.

Faculty and students at the Cockrell School of Engineering are developing ways for cancer patients and children born with facial deformities to make more informed decisions about which
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Tuesday, May 17, 2011

Developing a diagnostic device

Brian Zaccheo with his sensor for acute pancreatitis.

Brian Zaccheo with his sensor for acute pancreatitis.

When Brian Zaccheo designed a low-cost, self-powered diagnostic device for acute pancreatitis, he combined skills from his undergraduate training in biochemistry with the analytical chemistry expertise in the laboratory of his adviser, Prof. Richard Crooks.

But he added another element to the mix: business sense.

The result is a device that can be made cheaply with ingredients such as milk protein, gelatin, aluminum foil and LED lights.

It works quickly. Place a sample on the device
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