University of Texas at Austin

Archive for the ‘Computer science’ Category


Thursday, August 30, 2012

Computer scientists bring more humanity to game

The UT^2 game bot, created by two University of Texas at Austin Department of Computer Science graduate students and a professor, won the Humanlike Bot Competition at the IEEE World Congress on Computational Intelligence (WCCI 2012).

Jacob Schrum, Igor Karpov, and Prof. Risto Miikkulainen designed the game bot as part of their research into artificial intelligence (AI).

The UT^2 bot is the first winning bot in the history of the Humanlike Bot Competition to be judged as human more often than half the human players
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Tuesday, February 22, 2011

Wrapping up Watson

Ken Jennings, the Watson avatar and Brad Rutter on the Jeopardy! set.

Ken Jennings, the Watson avatar and Brad Rutter on the Jeopardy! set.

It’s been a few days since the IBM Corp.’s Watson computer won big at Jeopardy! and still no computer overlords.

What we do have is a new sense of what computers and artificial intelligence (AI) can do and how they can be used.

Researchers, including some at The University of Texas at Austin, have worked for decades to get computers to understand natural language, the way people talk. Computers have a
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Tuesday, February 15, 2011

Texas alumnus gives insight into Watson

James Fan, who received his Ph.D. at The University of Texas at Austin, is a member of the IBM team that built Watson, the Jeopardy! playing computer.

James Fan, who received his Ph.D. at The University of Texas at Austin, is a member of the IBM team that built Watson, the Jeopardy! playing computer.

University of Texas at Austin alumnus James Fan was one of 25 IBM Corp. employees who worked for four years to build a computer that could play the quiz show Jeopardy! with the best of them.

He returned to campus Monday to watch the first round of the Jeopardy! match between Watson, the IBM computer (named
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Monday, February 14, 2011

Computers not ready to take over, even if one wins Jeopardy!

If IBM Corp.’s Watson computer passes the Trebek Test, it doesn’t mean it will pass the Turing Test the next day. Or achieve world dominance.

Ray Mooney

Ray Mooney

The Trebek Test will take place Feb. 14, 15 and 16 in the Jeopardy! Challenge. The computer plays the Jeopardy! quiz show against two of the best players in Jeopardy! history. Alex Trebek is the host of Jeopardy!

The computer must make sense of the tricky clues, search the tons of information it has digested, find
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Thursday, November 11, 2010

Here’s the story on the computational engineering and science certificate program at ICES

Undergraduate students who want to be America’s next top modeler can step toward that goal through an undergraduate certificate program at the Institute for Computational Engineering and Science (ICES).

First, understand that we’re talking about someone who programs models and runs simulations on a computer and not someone who struts down a runway—not that they are mutually exclusive.

But for those who want to develop models of physical systems, the Certificate in Computational Science and Engineering might be the ticket.

In the program, the students
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Friday, August 27, 2010

Supercomputing on the coffee maker power diet

These students will try to build a supercomputer that runs on 26 amps. They are, from left, Bethany Barrientos, Phillip Verheyden, Vladimir Coxall, Loren Micheloni, Alex Heinzmann. Jason Kilman is not pictured

These students will try to build a supercomputer that runs on 26 amps. They are, from left, Bethany Barrientos, Phillip Verheyden, Vladimir Coxall, Loren Micheloni, Alex Heinzmann. Jason Kilman is not pictured

You’re going to blow a fuse if you get too many kitchen appliances going at the same time.

So you really don’t want to plug in a power hungry supercomputer between the toaster oven and the coffee maker. Your entire zip code – or more – could go dark.

But it
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Friday, July 16, 2010

The university has an app for that

You could call it The University of Texas at Austin’s app store.

Bugao Xu developed a way to make a three dimensional body scan.

Bugao Xu developed a way to make a three dimensional body scan.

It’s the list of technologies developed by university researchers that are available for commercialization.

Want to give a drop of blood to see if you have cancer? There’s an app for that.

Want a three dimensional scan of your body? Hey, there’s an app for that.

Want to speed up the growth of your tomatoes? There’s an app for that.

Need a flexible e-reader or
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Monday, May 24, 2010

Crunching the numbers on the Ike Dike

Clint Dawson at the Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences is running computer simulations to test the feasibility of an extended seawall, in green, red and blue, along the Gulf Coast neaer Galveston Island.

Clint Dawson at the Institute for Computational Engineering Sciences is running computer simulations to test the feasibility of an extended seawall near Galveston Island.

Would the Ike Dike, a wall 17 feet high and 60 miles long along the Gulf Coast, protect Galveston Bay from strong hurricanes?

A group of researchers at the Institute of Computational Engineering and Sciences (ICES) at The University of Texas at Austin is trying to answer to that question by running sophisticated computer simulations to see what would
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Monday, March 1, 2010

Game for evolution

Risto Miikklulainen

Risto Miikklulainen

Part of The University of Texas at Austin’s role in a $25 million “evolution in action” project called BEACON involves a computer game.

This game was developed to research artificial intelligence and it shows evolution in action. The game is NERO, which stands for Neuro-Evolving Robotic Operatives. In the game, the characters evolve to improve their performance of tasks.

It’s based on the neural network research in the laboratory of Risto Miikkulainen, a professor in the Department of Computer Science and a
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Tuesday, September 22, 2009

Data lost and found

Teams of computer scientists at several universities including The University of Texas at Austin are battling each other on disappearing and reappearing digitized data.

John Markoff, a computer reporter for the New York Times, has the story.

He was on campus last week (Sept. 17, 2009) interviewing Bob Taylor, the university alumnus who played a big role in developing he Internet and other tools of the digital age.

There’s also a university press release on Unvanish.

Vanish, created by researchers at the University of Washington,
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