University of Texas at Austin

Archive for the ‘engineering’ Category


Wednesday, September 14, 2011

Why your ride is more of a glide

In recent years, automobiles have become quieter and more comfortable.

For that you can thank an engineering professor at The University of Texas at Austin.

box4Dr. Jeffrey Bennighof, professor in the Department of Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics in the Cockrell School of Engineering, developed software that manufacturers have used to reduce noise and vibration.

The Automated Multilevel Substructuring (AMLS) software enables fast and accurate prediction of car vibrations over a wide frequency range on inexpensive computers. Analyses are done in hours on
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Monday, August 29, 2011

UT Austin displays significant inventions for regents

Two of The University of Texas at Austin’s significant inventions were highlighted for the Technology Transfer and Research Committee of the University of Texas Systems Board of Regents at an Aug. 24, 2011 meeting.

Richard Miller, chief commercialization officer at The University of Texas at Austin.

Richard Miller, chief commercialization officer at The University of Texas at Austin.

Both inventions bring significant benefits to society and revenue to the university, said Richard Miller, the chief commercialization officer of The University of Texas at Austin.

One invention has provided manufacturers with safe, reliable and rechargeable batteries
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Thursday, July 14, 2011

Engineering better reconstructive surgery results

Computer simulations "provide patients with a realistic picture of what they would look like after their surgery and are constrained by what is actually surgically possible," said biomedical engineer Mia Markey.Computer simulations “provide patients with a realistic picture of what they would look like after their surgery and are constrained by what is actually surgically possible,” said biomedical engineer Mia Markey. Photo by Melissa Mixon.

This story was first published on the Cockrell School of Engineering Web site. It was written by Melissa Mixon.

Faculty and students at the Cockrell School of Engineering are developing ways for cancer patients and children born with facial deformities to make more informed decisions about which
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Monday, July 11, 2011

A new model of YOUR blood flow

For a professor in the Department of Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics, spending time crunching numbers is leading to technologies that could save lives.

Thomas Hughes is developing three dimensional models of blood flow of individual patients.

Thomas Hughes is developing three dimensional models of blood flow of individual patients.

Dr. Thomas Hughes and his colleagues have pioneered patient-specific 3-D models of blood flow through the heart and blood vessels that could help guide best practices for cardiologists.

Rather than relying on earlier computer models — where simple two-dimensional geometry shared little resemblance to actual anatomy —
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Friday, May 13, 2011

Carbon “sponge” could charge supercapacitors

University of Texas at Austin collaborators Meryl Stoller, Dr. Yanwu Zhu and Dr. Rodney Ruoff stand with a 3-D model of the new carbon material they have created.

University of Texas at Austin collaborators Meryl Stoller, Dr. Yanwu Zhu and Dr. Rodney Ruoff stand with a 3-D model of the new carbon material they have created.

Researchers at The University of Texas at Austin’s have created a new porous, three-dimensional carbon that can be used as a greatly enhanced supercapacitor, holding promise for energy storage in everything from energy grids and electric cars to consumer electronics.

The significance of the discovery is the potential it offers for enabling supercapacitors to
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Friday, April 15, 2011

Undergrads do research

Psychology undergraduate Martinique Jones has conducted research in Houston schools.

Psychology undergraduate Martinique Jones has conducted research in Houston schools.

We put the spotlight on several undergraduates who conduct research to mark Research Week, which was April 11-15.

Check out their stories on the Know Web site.

Martinique Jones
Major: Psychology
Research Topic: The African American Dream: A Progressive Discussion of Academic Achievement in African American Students

Margaret Sanders
Major: Plan II and Psychology
Research Topic: The Effect of Categorization on Judgments of Paintings

Zachary Garber
Major: Government
Research Topic: William Lauder’s Impact on the History of Barbados

Jose Ybarra
Major: Human Biology
Research Topic:
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Thursday, February 17, 2011

FASTRAC satellites on track

fastracimageTwo satellites designed and built by students at the Cockrell School of Engineering have passed two major milestones since their launch Nov. 19 from the Kodiak Launch Complex in Alaska.

The 60-plus pound satellites, named Emma and Sara Lily, survived orbit during the most extreme hot conditions they will face in space — orbiting for hours in front of the sun — and in the coldest conditions, being directly behind the Earth’s shadow.

“We wanted to make sure the satellites could live through
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Monday, February 14, 2011

Computers not ready to take over, even if one wins Jeopardy!

If IBM Corp.’s Watson computer passes the Trebek Test, it doesn’t mean it will pass the Turing Test the next day. Or achieve world dominance.

Ray Mooney

Ray Mooney

The Trebek Test will take place Feb. 14, 15 and 16 in the Jeopardy! Challenge. The computer plays the Jeopardy! quiz show against two of the best players in Jeopardy! history. Alex Trebek is the host of Jeopardy!

The computer must make sense of the tricky clues, search the tons of information it has digested, find
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Tuesday, January 4, 2011

Building a ‘Green Star State’

Graduate student Melissa Lott studies energy systems, from generation to consumption. Photo by Mary Christenberry Lott.

Graduate student Melissa Lott studies energy systems, from generation to consumption. Photo by Mary Christenberry Lott.

Researchers across The University of Texas at Austin are working on energy. Generating it, storing it, conserving it, using it sensibly. Students are actively engaged in energy research, which could shape their world. Here’s an interview with Melissa Lott, a student who is researching energy systems. She is a dual degree graduate student in the Cockrell School of Engineering and LBJ School for Public Affairs.
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Wednesday, November 17, 2010

Student research: Fastrac satellite to launch

Current members of the FASTRAC team and their adviser, Prof. Glenn Lightsey, middle row, far right.

Current members of the FASTRAC team and their adviser, Prof. Glenn Lightsey, middle row, far right.

A satellite designed and built by engineering students from the Cockrell School of Engineering at The University of Texas at Austin is to be launched. The scheduled date is Nov. 19, 2010.

The launch comes seven years after a group of engineering students entered a competition to build a satellite and five years after the students’ design was chosen. About 150 students have participated in the
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