University of Texas at Austin

Archive for the ‘engineering’ Category


Thursday, November 11, 2010

Here’s the story on the computational engineering and science certificate program at ICES

Undergraduate students who want to be America’s next top modeler can step toward that goal through an undergraduate certificate program at the Institute for Computational Engineering and Science (ICES).

First, understand that we’re talking about someone who programs models and runs simulations on a computer and not someone who struts down a runway—not that they are mutually exclusive.

But for those who want to develop models of physical systems, the Certificate in Computational Science and Engineering might be the ticket.

In the program, the students
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Thursday, October 7, 2010

Teens and pickup trucks–not such a good mix

Transportation expert Chandra Bhat and his daughter, Prerna, who just received her driver's license. Bhat and two of his graduate students have a new study on aggressive driving behavior and how it relates to the severity of injuries sustained during an accident.

Transportation expert Chandra Bhat and his daughter, Prerna, who just received her driver’s license. Bhat and two of his graduate students have a new study on aggressive driving behavior and how it relates to the severity of injuries sustained during an accident.

Chandra Bhat, one of The University of Texas at Austin’s traffic authorities, has a new study on aggressive driving.

One finding: 16- and 17-year-old drivers behind the wheel of a pickup truck are 100 percent more likely to be
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Friday, August 20, 2010

Updates from Thunder Bay

The ARL:UT team launches the ATLAS sonar into Lake Huron.

The ARL:UT team launches the ATLAS sonar into Lake Huron.

Charles Loeffler, senior research engineer at the Applied Research Laboratories, and Russ Green, deputy superintendent and research coordinator of the Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary, are writing logs about their activities at Thunder Bay.

Stay in touch with the project which runs through Aug. 27, 2010, at its Web site. It includes the logs, photos and video.

Friday, July 16, 2010

The university has an app for that

You could call it The University of Texas at Austin’s app store.

Bugao Xu developed a way to make a three dimensional body scan.

Bugao Xu developed a way to make a three dimensional body scan.

It’s the list of technologies developed by university researchers that are available for commercialization.

Want to give a drop of blood to see if you have cancer? There’s an app for that.

Want a three dimensional scan of your body? Hey, there’s an app for that.

Want to speed up the growth of your tomatoes? There’s an app for that.

Need a flexible e-reader or
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Monday, July 12, 2010

GRACE gets extension and noticed

graceThe Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) mission is included in a recent article on the Environment 360 Web site as one of the crucial ways scientists are keeping track of changes in the Earth’s climate from space.

GRACE is a twin-satellite array that measures changes in gravity around the world. Scores of scientists have used data collected by the satellites to track changes ranging from Greenland’s and Antarctica’s ice sheets to the amount of water in California’s aquifers.

Engineering Professor Byron Tapley of The
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Tuesday, June 1, 2010

Forum hears from Pecan Street Project

Brewster McCracken, executive director of the Pecan Street Project

Brewster McCracken, executive director of the Pecan Street Project

The Deepwater Horizon oil spill has been a reminder about the tremendous expertise The University of Texas at Austin has in petroleum and related issues.

Experts from petroleum engineering, supercomputing, government and law have been sought for their views on the BP spill: what happened, what continues to happen and what it all means.

The June 1 Austin Forum event is a reminder that the university has ample expertise in alternative forms of energy: wind,
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Monday, May 24, 2010

Crunching the numbers on the Ike Dike

Clint Dawson at the Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences is running computer simulations to test the feasibility of an extended seawall, in green, red and blue, along the Gulf Coast neaer Galveston Island.

Clint Dawson at the Institute for Computational Engineering Sciences is running computer simulations to test the feasibility of an extended seawall near Galveston Island.

Would the Ike Dike, a wall 17 feet high and 60 miles long along the Gulf Coast, protect Galveston Bay from strong hurricanes?

A group of researchers at the Institute of Computational Engineering and Sciences (ICES) at The University of Texas at Austin is trying to answer to that question by running sophisticated computer simulations to see what would
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Thursday, May 20, 2010

Perspective on the Deepwater Horizon spill

Paul Bommer

Paul Bommer

No one yet knows what really happened to cause the Deepwater Horizon explosion and subsequent release of millions of gallons of oil and gas into the Gulf of Mexico.

But Paul Bommer, a senior lecturer in the Cockrell School of Engineering at The University of Texas, presented a good view of what might have gone wrong when he spoke May 18 at the “Oil in Troubled Waters” forum on causes and consequences of the spill. The university’s Energy Institute sponsored the
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Monday, May 10, 2010

Grad student working to reduce solar energy costs

Reeja Jayan is conducting research in solar energy.

Reeja Jayan is developing a cost-effective solar cell.

This post comes from the Graduate School:

The amount of solar energy that the Earth receives in one hour is more than the energy demand for the entire world for an entire year.

Kind of incredible, isn’t it?

For Reeja Jayan, learning this one fact changed the course of her life entirely.

“It was one of those moments where I thought, ‘why aren’t we using this?’” says Jayan, who was an Electrical Engineering master’s degree student at
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Wednesday, April 21, 2010

Mary Wheeler named fellow in American Academy

Mary Wheeler, member American Academy of Arts and Sciences

Mary Wheeler, member American Academy of Arts and Sciences

Mary Wheeler does complex mathematics and computation to figure out what’s going on under the surface. She’s director of the Center for Subsurface Modeling at The University of Texas at Austin and her work is used to recover and gas, determine where groundwater contaminants are going and whether carbon sequestration works.

She was named this week as a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Read about Wheeler in a Cockrell School of Engineering
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