University of Texas at Austin

Archive for the ‘mathematics’ Category


Tuesday, November 23, 2010

Random sampling as good at terror screenings as racial profiling, prof says

This post originated in a paper that Prof. William Press published in Significance.

William Press

William Press

Stop using racial profiling, says Professor William Press of The University of Texas at Austin.

He claims that as well as being politically and ethically questionable, racial profiling does no better in helping law enforcement officials in their task of catching terrorists than standard uniform random sampling techniques.

This is the topic of a paper in Significance, the magazine of the Royal Statistical Society and the American Statistical Association.

Press previously
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Friday, September 3, 2010

Getting on the cover of Science

From 27 August 2010 Vol 329, Issue 5995, Pages 985-1112. Reprinted with permission from AAAS.

From 27 August 2010 Vol 329, Issue 5995, Pages 985-1112. Reprinted with permission from AAAS.

It’s not the same as getting your picture on the cover of Rolling Stone magazine, but getting an image you created on the cover of Science is still cool.

Georg Stadler’s computer-generated image of a brand-new way to more accurately show plate tectonics in a computer simulation was featured on the cover of the journal’s Aug. 27 edition.

“We heard about the interest of Science in featuring our
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Friday, August 27, 2010

Supercomputing on the coffee maker power diet

These students will try to build a supercomputer that runs on 26 amps. They are, from left, Bethany Barrientos, Phillip Verheyden, Vladimir Coxall, Loren Micheloni, Alex Heinzmann. Jason Kilman is not pictured

These students will try to build a supercomputer that runs on 26 amps. They are, from left, Bethany Barrientos, Phillip Verheyden, Vladimir Coxall, Loren Micheloni, Alex Heinzmann. Jason Kilman is not pictured

You’re going to blow a fuse if you get too many kitchen appliances going at the same time.

So you really don’t want to plug in a power hungry supercomputer between the toaster oven and the coffee maker. Your entire zip code – or more – could go dark.

But it
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Wednesday, June 2, 2010

Tate picks up Abel Prize

John Tate, left, gets a hand from King Harald of Norway after presentation of the Abel Prize/Photo: Scanpix/Berit Roald, The Abel Prize/The Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters

John Tate, left, gets a hand from King Harald of Norway after presentation of the Abel Prize/Photo: Scanpix/Berit Roald, The Abel Prize/The Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters

John Tate, a professor emeritus of mathematics at The University of Texas at Austin, received the Abel Prize on May 25, 2010 from King Harald of Norway in a ceremony in Oslo.

The prize was awarded to Tate by the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters for his vast and lasting impact on the theory
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Wednesday, April 21, 2010

Mary Wheeler named fellow in American Academy

Mary Wheeler, member American Academy of Arts and Sciences

Mary Wheeler, member American Academy of Arts and Sciences

Mary Wheeler does complex mathematics and computation to figure out what’s going on under the surface. She’s director of the Center for Subsurface Modeling at The University of Texas at Austin and her work is used to recover and gas, determine where groundwater contaminants are going and whether carbon sequestration works.

She was named this week as a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Read about Wheeler in a Cockrell School of Engineering
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Friday, May 29, 2009

Spring 2009 discoveries revisited

The spring 2009 semester has ended and that’s a good time to take another look at some of the research that came out of University of Texas at Austin labs in the past few months.

Here’s a roundup of some of the more interesting discoveries in exercise, psychology, business and statistics.

Add crunch to your post workout recovery

In a study of well-trained cyclists, exercise physiologist Lynne Kammer found that a bowl of whole grain cereal is as good as a sports drink
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Friday, May 15, 2009

Getting Started–Michael Starbird

Michael Starbird

Michael Starbird

As part of Further Findings’ Getting Started series, Michael Starbird, a mathematics professor at The University of Texas at Austin, explains how he got involved with numbers.

“I was brought up in southern California and my father taught mathematics, physics and astronomy at a community college and he would bring mathematical and physics problems to the dinner table,” he said. “My brother and I talked about them.

“Mathematics was just a part of daily life. In fact, I often look back
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Tuesday, March 3, 2009

Behind NUMB3RS

“Murder and math. What could be better?”

That’s how Michael Starbird, professor of mathematics, describes his appreciation for the CBS show “Numb3rs.”

Starbird and “Numb3rs” (on CBS at 9 p.m. Fridays) came together at a recent Science Study Break, a series that connects the science in movies and television shows to real science. Past lectures include anthropologist John Kappelman on “Bones” and biologist David Hillis on “CSI.”

“Numb3rs,” in its fifth season, chronicles the adventures of Charles Eppes, a math genius and professor
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Wednesday, January 7, 2009

Math prizes add up

Luis Caffarelli

Luis Caffarelli

Luis Caffarelli has become the second mathematician from The University of Texas at Austin in two years to receive a Leroy P. Steele Prize from the American Mathematical Society (AMS). The Steele Prize is considered one of the top three prizes in mathematics.

The Steele Prize is actually three awards. Caffarelli’s was for lifetime achievement, the award that John Tate, a math professor, won in 1995. The university’s Karen Uhlenbeck received the prize for seminal research contribution in 2007.

The other Steele Prize
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