University of Texas at Austin

Archive for the ‘Paleontology’ Category


Wednesday, June 8, 2011

Research Roundup Spring 2011: Black holes, subsurface fjords, early mammal brains and more

In the last few months, researchers at The University of Texas at Austin dealt with black holes, dead zones and ice kilometers under the surface of Antarctica.

They found that early mammals evolved bigger brains for the sense of smell. They found that alcohol helps a brain to remember.

They made a carbon “sponge” that could store energy and a $1 biosensing diagnostic device that’s self-powered.

They found that teenagers who don’t fit in are less likely to go for higher education.

To help
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Wednesday, March 30, 2011

Scientific teamwork revealed new penguin’s colors

Worldwide collaboration discovers, elucidates ancient species found in Peru

Prof. Julia Clarke, paleontologist studying the origin and evolution of birds and related dinosaurs..

Prof. Julia Clarke, paleontologist studying the origin and evolution of birds and related dinosaurs..

The discovery process started with the eagle eye of a young fossil hunter in the Peruvian desert, continued with the meticulous work of fossil experts from Texas, Peru and North Carolina in a Lima laboratory and incorporated techniques recently developed in Connecticut and Ohio.

The result was the identification of a new species of giant penguin from 36 million years
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Tuesday, December 28, 2010

Research Round Up: Fall 2010

Penguin fossil found in Peru showed surprising evidence of feathers and their colors.

Penguin fossil found in Peru showed surprising evidence of feathers and their colors.

During the fall semester of 2010, researchers at The University of Texas at Austin revealed:

An ancient penguin with surprising colors

Honey bees with a failure to communicate

Criminal virus spreaders using evolutionary forensics

An electron switch between molecules with cool battery potential

That as biological clock ticks down, libido rises

A dinosaur who thrived when its competition died

Ways the earth moves

That’s not all.

A team of students launched two satellites, which they built, into
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Thursday, October 28, 2010

UTexas CT scan lab screened on Wired Science

Flipping through the channels during a break in the World Series broadcast Wednesday (Oct. 27), I saw Wired Science on KLRU 3. In the what’s coming up list for the show, it listed “Virtual Paleontology.”

The digitized 3D  image of a dinosaur skull from the High Resolution X-Ray CT lab.

The digitized 3D image of a dinosaur skull from the High Resolution X-Ray CT lab.

I kept checking back to see if the segment was about the High Resolution X-Ray CT Facility at The University of Texas at Austin that makes scans of fossils to reveal their shapes in
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Monday, May 17, 2010

Updated: Research round up: Spring 2010

The northern ice cap of Mars, showing spiral troughs and Chasma Boreale.

The northern ice cap of Mars, showing spiral troughs and Chasma Boreale.

Catch up on University of Texas at Austin research from the spring 2010 semester when these questions were answered.

How were two curious features in the northern ice cap of Mars — a chasm larger than the Grand Canyon and a series of spiral troughs formed?

Jack Holt and Isaac Smith of The University of Texas at Austin’s Institute for Geophysics and their colleagues used radar data collected by NASA’s Mars
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Friday, April 23, 2010

Name that dinosaur

Wann Langston

Wann Langston

It’s OK that paleontologists from Yale University, California State University-Stanislaus and the Royal Tyrell Museum in Alberta, Canada found a new species of dinosaur in Big Bend National Park.

The National Park Service calls the park a “paleontological paradise,” where more than 90 dinosaur species have been found. So there’s plenty to go around.

And the paleontologists mitigated their “poaching” by naming the dinosaur after Wann Langston Jr., a professor emeritus at The University of Texas at Austin. He’s one of
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