University of Texas at Austin

Archive for the ‘psychology’ Category


Monday, March 18, 2013

My space? Your space? What makes it our space?

Take a look at your bedroom. Is it scattered with laundry? Adorned with photos? Are you only leaving a sliver of space in the closet for your partner’s clothes? These seemingly mundane domestic scenarios may reveal a surprising amount of information about a couple’s relationship, according to a forthcoming study led by Lindsay Graham, a psychology graduate student at The University of Texas at Austin.

In collaboration with Sam Gosling, professor of psychology and author of “Snoop: What Your Stuff Says
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Friday, November 16, 2012

Silver Tsunami brings crest of Alzheimer’s Disease

It’s called the “Silver Tsunami” – the swelling number of baby boomers surpassing age 65. As medical advancements extend their lives, they’re expected to live well into their 80s and 90s – outlasting any generation in American history.

But among Americans over 80 – who represent the fastest growing segment of the U.S. population – half are debilitated with a neurodegenerative disorder. Of this group, 5.4 million now have Alzheimer’s Disease. By year 2050, that number is expected to balloon to
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Friday, April 15, 2011

Undergrads do research

Psychology undergraduate Martinique Jones has conducted research in Houston schools.

Psychology undergraduate Martinique Jones has conducted research in Houston schools.

We put the spotlight on several undergraduates who conduct research to mark Research Week, which was April 11-15.

Check out their stories on the Know Web site.

Martinique Jones
Major: Psychology
Research Topic: The African American Dream: A Progressive Discussion of Academic Achievement in African American Students

Margaret Sanders
Major: Plan II and Psychology
Research Topic: The Effect of Categorization on Judgments of Paintings

Zachary Garber
Major: Government
Research Topic: William Lauder’s Impact on the History of Barbados

Jose Ybarra
Major: Human Biology
Research Topic:
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Tuesday, February 1, 2011

The first Longhorn in space

Sam, the rhesus monkey, was launched on Dec. 4, 1959. He and Miss Sam, launched a month later, were trained at The University of Texas at Austin. Photo by NASA.

Sam, a Rhesus monkey, was launched on Dec. 4, 1959. He and Miss Sam, launched a month later, were trained at The University of Texas at Austin. Photo by NASA.

The 50th anniversary of the first primate shot into space by Americans was this week.

On Jan. 31, 1961, Ham, a chimpanzee, was launched 160 miles above the Earth. The chimp became something of a celebrity after a photo spread in Life magazine immortalized his flight.

The University of Texas at Austin didn’t have
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Tuesday, December 28, 2010

Research Round Up: Fall 2010

Penguin fossil found in Peru showed surprising evidence of feathers and their colors.

Penguin fossil found in Peru showed surprising evidence of feathers and their colors.

During the fall semester of 2010, researchers at The University of Texas at Austin revealed:

An ancient penguin with surprising colors

Honey bees with a failure to communicate

Criminal virus spreaders using evolutionary forensics

An electron switch between molecules with cool battery potential

That as biological clock ticks down, libido rises

A dinosaur who thrived when its competition died

Ways the earth moves

That’s not all.

A team of students launched two satellites, which they built, into
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Tuesday, November 30, 2010

It adds up when the gift you buy is all about you

Susan Broniarczyk, McCombs School marketing professor, researched link between what we buy and who we are

Susan Broniarczyk, McCombs School faculty member,researched link between what we buy and who we are

The McCombs School of Business posts a timely story about shopping that can have an emotional and financial impact.

What happens when the perfect gift for a friend is just not you?

Two university researchers warn shoppers to beware of gifts that cause them to feel uncomfortable about their own identity (“I’ll give you this, but I don’t like it.”). Such purchases can spur gift givers to spend
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Wednesday, November 3, 2010

Music and learning: Hey, baby, they’re playing your song

Eugenia Costa-Giomi. Photo by Marsha Miller

Eugenia Costa-Giomi. Photo by Marsha Miller

Music Professor Eugenia Costa-Giomi gave me a test that she gives to infants as part of her musical cognition research.

Infants pass the test. I failed.

The consolation was that most other adults fail, too.

The test is to watch and listen to alternating videos of two young women singing two different melodies, which are Bach minuets. In the first set of videos, one woman sings one melody and the other sings another melody.

In the second set, things
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Monday, July 26, 2010

Would you give it up for the group?

Jessica Sinn of the College of Liberal Arts writes about Prof. William Swann’s research in identity fusion.

Dr. William Swann

Dr. William Swann

Imagine a runaway trolley hurtling down the tracks toward a handful of people. If it continues on its course, it will kill the group of innocent bystanders. You’re given two options to save the day: throw a switch and kill only one person, or sacrifice your own life by leaping in front of the trolley. What would you do?

In a study, to
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Wednesday, May 26, 2010

Podcast features psych professor

Jennifer Beer

Jennifer Beer

Jennifer Beer, an assistant psychology at The University of Texas at Austin, talks about her research on the relationship of not thinking and overconfidence in an interview with Daniel Ariely, a behavioral economist at Duke University.

The interview is on Ariely’s podast, Arming the Donkeys, and is available at Duke’s iTunes U. channel.

The podcast is about Beer’s research that found that the less you use your brain’s frontal lobes, the more you see yourself through rose-colored glasses.

“In healthy people, the more you
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Monday, May 17, 2010

Updated: Research round up: Spring 2010

The northern ice cap of Mars, showing spiral troughs and Chasma Boreale.

The northern ice cap of Mars, showing spiral troughs and Chasma Boreale.

Catch up on University of Texas at Austin research from the spring 2010 semester when these questions were answered.

How were two curious features in the northern ice cap of Mars — a chasm larger than the Grand Canyon and a series of spiral troughs formed?

Jack Holt and Isaac Smith of The University of Texas at Austin’s Institute for Geophysics and their colleagues used radar data collected by NASA’s Mars
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