University of Texas at Austin

Archive for the ‘science and policy’ Category


Monday, May 23, 2011

How changing the world got started

In remarks at a panel on the research mission of universities, Dr. J. Tinsley Oden showed this sampling of the research going on at the Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences at The University of Texas at Austin. It ranges from predicting the paths of hurricanes to laser surgery on cancer cells.

In remarks at a panel on the research mission of universities, Dr. J. Tinsley Oden showed this sampling of research going on at the Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences at The University of Texas at Austin. It ranges from predicting the paths of hurricanes to laser surgery on cancer cells.

Dr. J. Tinsley Oden, director of the Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences at The University of Texas at Austin, highlighted the development of universities as research institutions in this remarks. He
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Tuesday, December 7, 2010

Protecting ideas with patents

Top patent officials from around the world gave an Austin audience insight into current intellectual property issues. They were James Pooley, deputy director of the World Intellectual Property Organization; Jerry Kappos, director of the United States Patent Office; and Lee Soowon, director of the Korean Intellectual Property Office. They talked with Richard Miller, chief commercialization officer of The University of Texas at Austin. Photo by Marsha Miller.

Top patent officials from around the world gave an Austin audience insight into current intellectual property issues. They were James Pooley, deputy director of the World Intellectual Property Organization; Jerry Kappos, director of the United States Patent Office; and Lee Soowon, director of the Korean Intellectual Property Office. They talked with Richard Miller, chief commercialization officer of The University of Texas at Austin. Photo by Marsha Miller.

Patent protection has gone global, according to David Kappos, the director of the United
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Tuesday, November 23, 2010

Random sampling as good at terror screenings as racial profiling, prof says

This post originated in a paper that Prof. William Press published in Significance.

William Press

William Press

Stop using racial profiling, says Professor William Press of The University of Texas at Austin.

He claims that as well as being politically and ethically questionable, racial profiling does no better in helping law enforcement officials in their task of catching terrorists than standard uniform random sampling techniques.

This is the topic of a paper in Significance, the magazine of the Royal Statistical Society and the American Statistical Association.

Press previously
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Monday, October 4, 2010

Being aware of ethical research

The student panel at Ethical Research Awareness Day was composed of, from left, Milena Batanova, Jeffrey Easley, Ingrid Bachmann and Jonathan Dau. Photo by Rebecca McIntee.

The student panel at Ethical Research Awareness Day was composed of, from left, Milena Batanova, Jeffrey Easley, Ingrid Bachmann and Jonathan Dau. Photo by Rebecca McIntee.

The first Ethical Research Awareness Day at The University of Texas at Austin was Sept. 29, but the theme of a meeting to mark the day was that every day should be ethical research awareness day.

The meeting had been in the works for months, but it was held in the wake of high-profile research retractions.
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Monday, May 24, 2010

Crunching the numbers on the Ike Dike

Clint Dawson at the Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences is running computer simulations to test the feasibility of an extended seawall, in green, red and blue, along the Gulf Coast neaer Galveston Island.

Clint Dawson at the Institute for Computational Engineering Sciences is running computer simulations to test the feasibility of an extended seawall near Galveston Island.

Would the Ike Dike, a wall 17 feet high and 60 miles long along the Gulf Coast, protect Galveston Bay from strong hurricanes?

A group of researchers at the Institute of Computational Engineering and Sciences (ICES) at The University of Texas at Austin is trying to answer to that question by running sophisticated computer simulations to see what would
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Thursday, May 20, 2010

Perspective on the Deepwater Horizon spill

Paul Bommer

Paul Bommer

No one yet knows what really happened to cause the Deepwater Horizon explosion and subsequent release of millions of gallons of oil and gas into the Gulf of Mexico.

But Paul Bommer, a senior lecturer in the Cockrell School of Engineering at The University of Texas, presented a good view of what might have gone wrong when he spoke May 18 at the “Oil in Troubled Waters” forum on causes and consequences of the spill. The university’s Energy Institute sponsored the
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Thursday, August 20, 2009

Straightening science policy

Wendy Wagner

Wendy Wagner

In late 2008, Wendy Wagner, a law professor at The University of Texas at Austin, got a call. Would she serve on a panel that would develop guidelines for the proper role of science in setting regulatory policies?

Wagner has written books with titles like “Bending Science: How Special Interests Corrupt Public Health Research” (co-authored with Texas law colleague Thomas McGarity) and “Rescuing Science from Politics: Regulation and the Distortion of Scientific Research.”

Could there be any other answer than
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