University of Texas at Austin

Archive for the ‘student research’ Category


Monday, May 10, 2010

Grad student working to reduce solar energy costs

Reeja Jayan is conducting research in solar energy.

Reeja Jayan is developing a cost-effective solar cell.

This post comes from the Graduate School:

The amount of solar energy that the Earth receives in one hour is more than the energy demand for the entire world for an entire year.

Kind of incredible, isn’t it?

For Reeja Jayan, learning this one fact changed the course of her life entirely.

“It was one of those moments where I thought, ‘why aren’t we using this?’” says Jayan, who was an Electrical Engineering master’s degree student at
Read More …

Monday, August 10, 2009

Before college, students do real research: Part 2

Kanish Mehta

Kanish Mehta

In our last episode, Jay Kapoor, a soon-to-be freshman at The University of Texas at Austin, shared his experiences in the Science & Engineering Apprenticeship Program at the university’s Applied Research Laboratories (ARL:UT).

Now Kanish Mehta, who also will start the the university in the fall semester, shares his thoughts about the program.

Mehta graduated from Anderson High School. His supervisor in the ARL:UT program is Trevor Garner, a research associate in ARL:UT’s Space and Geophysics Laboratory. Mehta’s project is Investigating the Morphology of
Read More …

Friday, August 7, 2009

Before college, students do real research: Part 1

The Science & Engineering Apprenticeship Program at the university’s Applied Research Laboratories (ARL:UT) is a competitive program for graduating seniors from primarily Austin area high schools. The apprentices receive hands-on experience in laboratory research and development projects during the summer before they begin college.

Twenty one students are participating in the program this summer–16 at ARL:UT and five at the university’s Institute for Advanced Technology.

Two of the apprentices have shared their summer experiences with Further Findings. First up is Jay Kapoor. We’ll hear from
Read More …

Friday, May 29, 2009

Spring 2009 discoveries revisited

The spring 2009 semester has ended and that’s a good time to take another look at some of the research that came out of University of Texas at Austin labs in the past few months.

Here’s a roundup of some of the more interesting discoveries in exercise, psychology, business and statistics.

Add crunch to your post workout recovery

In a study of well-trained cyclists, exercise physiologist Lynne Kammer found that a bowl of whole grain cereal is as good as a sports drink
Read More …

Tuesday, March 24, 2009

Follow data, find frogs

Dendrobates mysteriosus is from the transition between the Andes Mountains to Amazonia in northeastern Perus.

Dendrobates mysteriosus is from the transition between the Andes Mountains to Amazonia in northeastern Perus.

Detectives follow the evidence. Reporters follow the money. Scientists follow the data.

They might not know where these things will lead, but, one way or another, it should be the truth—or at least as close to it as they can get.

Juan Santos, a Ph.D. student in integrative biology, followed the data from the Amazon River basin up into the Andes Mountains and back to the Amazon to
Read More …

Saturday, September 20, 2008

An ancient ant

Christian Rabeling was facing the deadline for finishing the fieldwork for his master’s thesis.

As part of his work, Rabeling mapped entrances to ant nests in a Brazilian rain forest. And to find an entrance, you follow an ant. The ants he was studying weren’t helping.

“A. they’re small and B. they’re slow,” he said.

Breathe on a leaf near an ant and it will freeze in its tracks. It takes a while for them to get going again. “It requires a
Read More …