University of Texas at Austin

Archive for the ‘Supercomputing’ Category


Tuesday, March 9, 2010

On the World Community Grid

Stan Watowich, World Community Grid user

Stan Watowich, World Community Grid user

The World Community Grid (WCG) now has a half-million users dedicating the unused power of their personal computers—and bigger computers, in some cases—to solving pressing scientific questions.

A story on the Web site of the Texas Advanced Computing Center (TACC), which donates cycles from one of its high-performance computers to the WCG, looks at the WCG and how it works.

The story highlights the research of Stan Watowich, an associate professor of Biochemistry at The University of Texas Medical Branch.

His
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Monday, February 8, 2010

Crunching Ranger’s numbers

Ranger

Ranger

In a world in which small computing devices such as the iPad and its cousins get a lot of attention and what they’re used for is getting smaller (I’ve used more than 140 characters already), it’s good to know there is still room for Big Iron.

Of course, big problems—such as astronomy, energy, biosciences, geosciences and climate—need a big computer with a lot of processing power.

That’s what we’re talking about with the Ranger supercomputer at the Texas Advanced Computing Center.

Some Ranger
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Tuesday, February 2, 2010

The “super” in supercomputers

Jay Boisseau, director of TACC

Jay Boisseau, director TACC

Supercomputers do work that affects our lives everyday.

Jay Boisseau, director of the Texas Advanced Computing Center at The University of Texas at Austin, says that supercomputers have an increasing impact on society and people might not realize the impact supercomputers have on their daily lives.

Supercomputers are used to design cars, making them better, safer, more fuel efficient, as well as many other products we use; help predict the weather from daily patterns to the movements of hurricanes; and
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Friday, May 22, 2009

Covering the over and under

Richard Matzner, digs black holes

Richard Matzner, digs black holes

[caption id="attachment_585" align="alignright" width="300" caption="Pablo Munguia, digs pen shell clams"]Pablo Munguia, digs pen shell clams[/caption]Today, Further Findings points readers to two research stories–one in outer space and the other under the sea–posted elsewhere on The University of Texas at Austin Web site.

Aaron Dubrow, the science writer at the Texas Advanced Computing Center (TACC), writes about the research of Richard Matzner, an astrophysicist at the university.

Matzner uses TACC’s Ranger supercomputer to simulate binary black hole mergers and search for gravitational waves. The waves were
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Wednesday, April 29, 2009

Exploring explosions

Visualization of a large jet fuel pool fire in a cross flow that is heating a suspended cylindrical container.

Visualization of a large jet fuel pool fire in a cross flow that is heating a suspended cylindrical container.

A story on the Web site of the Texas Advanced Computing Center (TACC) is about research to model explosions. It highlights the work of Charles Wright, a chemistry professor at the University of Utah, who is using TACC’s Ranger computer.

Experiments on explosions can be tricky, but they’re no piece of cake to model on a computer. The story explains: Explosions are particularly challenging
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Thursday, April 9, 2009

Drilling deep for biofuels at TACC

Mark Nimlos, National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Mark Nimlos, National Renewable Energy Laboratory

To get to some oil reserves, you have to drill deeply.

Scientists working on biofuels also drill deeply, but they drill into the molecular-level activity of enzymes instead of rock.

How energy researchers are doing this using the Ranger supercomputer at the Texas Advanced Computing Center (TACC) is the subject of a story by Aaron Dubrow, TACC’s science writer.

Dubrow shares some of his thoughts about the research:

“I thought some of the most interesting parts of the story were that
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