University of Texas at Austin

Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category


Tuesday, July 21, 2009

Skin cancer probe featured on KEYE

Ron Oliveira and James Tunnell

Ron Oliveira and James Tunnell

The skin cancer probe being developed in James Tunnell’s lab was featured on KEYE-TV-Channel 42 on the 10 p.m. newscast on July 20, 2009. KEYE’s Ron Oliveira went to Tunnell’s lab in the Biomedical Engineering building to interview Tunnell and Naras Rajaran, one of the graduate students working on the project.

See the video from KEYE.

The optical probe is designed to determine of a spot on the skin is benign or cancerous. If it’s not benign, the spot
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Wednesday, July 1, 2009

MCC “signs” off for the last time

The research consortium known as MCC died a long time ago, though it was the spark that fueled Austin’s rise as a technology center. Now the last visible reminders of the company are being removed.

The name of the company’s former headquarters building is being changed from the MCC building to the West Pickle Research building. It’s at 3525 W. Braker Lane, across MoPac Boulevard from the main Pickle Research Campus.

The new name reflects the building’s ownership by The University of
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Friday, May 22, 2009

Covering the over and under

Richard Matzner, digs black holes

Richard Matzner, digs black holes

[caption id="attachment_585" align="alignright" width="300" caption="Pablo Munguia, digs pen shell clams"]Pablo Munguia, digs pen shell clams[/caption]Today, Further Findings points readers to two research stories–one in outer space and the other under the sea–posted elsewhere on The University of Texas at Austin Web site.

Aaron Dubrow, the science writer at the Texas Advanced Computing Center (TACC), writes about the research of Richard Matzner, an astrophysicist at the university.

Matzner uses TACC’s Ranger supercomputer to simulate binary black hole mergers and search for gravitational waves. The waves were
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Tuesday, May 5, 2009

Code Crackers

Linda Schele

Linda Schele

[caption id="attachment_536" align="alignright" width="175" caption="David Stuart"]David Stuart[/caption]Two University of Texas at Austin researchers are prominently featured in “Cracking the Maya Code,” an episode of Nova on PBS. The episode, first aired in April 2008, is rebroadcast at 7 p.m. May 5 on KLRU. It also is available online at Hulu.com.

David Stuart\'s Take Five video

The program follows the efforts of archeologists who for more than a century tried to figure out the meaning of symbols, called glyphs, inscribed in Maya ruins
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Wednesday, April 29, 2009

Exploring explosions

Visualization of a large jet fuel pool fire in a cross flow that is heating a suspended cylindrical container.

Visualization of a large jet fuel pool fire in a cross flow that is heating a suspended cylindrical container.

A story on the Web site of the Texas Advanced Computing Center (TACC) is about research to model explosions. It highlights the work of Charles Wright, a chemistry professor at the University of Utah, who is using TACC’s Ranger computer.

Experiments on explosions can be tricky, but they’re no piece of cake to model on a computer. The story explains: Explosions are particularly challenging
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Thursday, April 23, 2009

Light and air interacting

Conception of laser-generated filaments for lightning control.

Conception of laser-generated filaments for lightning control.

When something unexpected happened during Aaron Bernstein’s laser experiment in ionization, he veered from the original experiment, followed the surprise and found something he calls “pretty darn cool.”

What Bernstein, a scientist in the Department of Physics at The University of Texas at Austin, and his colleagues found was that they could cross two laser beams in ambient laboratory air and transfer seven percent of the energy of one of the beams to the other.
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Monday, April 6, 2009

Eureka! I didn’t find it

Steven Weinberg

Steven Weinberg

Scientists search for new knowledge. They want to find out how things work—from inside cells to the edge of the universe.

So they’re disappointed when they don’t find what they expected or nothing at all, when nature throws them a curve when they expected a fastball.

Not necessarily.

Steven Weinberg, the Nobel Prize physicist at The University of Texas at Austin, hopes that the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) strikes out.

Basically, he said, what’s the fun in finding what you’re looking for? It’s
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Friday, April 3, 2009

Fear not the trip from lab to clinic

Marie Monfils

Marie Monfils

Marie Monfils studies a basic emotion, fear, in a basic model system, rodents.

But the assistant professor of psychology hopes her research will lead to effective therapies for complex phobias and anxiety disorders that affect people.

“To me that’s a big deal,” she said. “I’m always cautious in saying what I do has direct translational relevance, but I think it’s a step in the right direction.”

The “it” she referred to is her paper published April 2 in Science Express. She reported that
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Monday, March 30, 2009

With the stickleback, its lake can be a lab

Dan Bolnick

Dan Bolnick

The threespine stickleback is a fish biologists use as a model organism and have for about a century.

Dan Bolnick, an assistant professor in the Section of Integrative Biology, is a stickleback scientist who’s starting to use the fish in a new way to research relationships between organisms and parasites.

Bolnick’s work earned him selection as a Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) Early Career Scientist. John Wallingford, an associate professor of molecular cell and developmental biology, also was selected.

They are among 50
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Friday, March 6, 2009

Clarifying a climate debate

LeeAnn Kahlor

LeeAnn Kahlor

Those tracking the Earth’s temperatures might want to make a notation of a heat spike in February 2009.

That’s when newspaper columnist George Will wrote about his skepticism on global warming and the role of humans. He cited scientific data that he said supported his conclusions. Others said that Will misread, misinterpreted and mischaracterized the data, not least of all the scientists who compiled that data. More about the ruckus can be found at http://ksjtracker.mit.edu/?p=8707.

Argument, some of it heated, ensued in newspapers
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