University of Texas at Austin

Posts Tagged ‘cancer’


Thursday, August 8, 2013

UT Austin researchers develop cancer therapy that slows tumor growth

Researchers at The University of Texas at Austin have developed a combination of therapies that significantly reduced the rate and size at which human tumors grow in mice.

In mice treated with the combined therapy, tumors took more than 70 days on average to grow as large as they grew in 50 days in mice treated with the next most effective therapy, the researchers reported in a paper published in the journal Molecular Carcinogenesis.

Karen Vasquez, a researcher in the College of Pharmacy.

Karen Vasquez, a researcher in the College of
Read More …

Tuesday, October 30, 2012

Stopping Cancer in its Tracks

Dr. Kevin Dalby, professor of Medicinal Chemistry, and Scarlett Ferguson, a postdoctoral fellow in the College of Pharmacy, at work in Dalby’s lab.  (Marsha Miller)

Dr. Kevin Dalby, professor of Medicinal Chemistry, and Scarlett Ferguson, a postdoctoral fellow in the College of Pharmacy, at work in Dalby’s lab. (Marsha Miller)

Cancer researcher Kevin Dalby says he thinks scientists are on track to find a cure for cancer one day.

Make that cures for cancers.

There are so many ways for cells to go bad and become cancerous that anti-cancer therapies will need to include customized agents to modify various cancer-causing targets. Dalby, a professor in the College of
Read More …

Thursday, September 22, 2011

The image of cancer

There are more than 1.2 million cases of skin cancer in the United States each year.

Biomedical engineers at The University of Texas at Austin have developed a device that could reduce the need for biopsies that are performed to determine whether a growth is cancerous.

James Tunnell and his student researchers developed a pen-sized, light-based device for detecting skin cancers.

James Tunnell and his student researchers developed a pen-sized, light-based device for detecting skin cancers.

For every melanoma found, doctors perform approximately 50 biopsies. As a result, healthcare providers spend billions of dollars per year taking
Read More …

Thursday, July 14, 2011

Engineering better reconstructive surgery results

Computer simulations "provide patients with a realistic picture of what they would look like after their surgery and are constrained by what is actually surgically possible," said biomedical engineer Mia Markey.Computer simulations “provide patients with a realistic picture of what they would look like after their surgery and are constrained by what is actually surgically possible,” said biomedical engineer Mia Markey. Photo by Melissa Mixon.

This story was first published on the Cockrell School of Engineering Web site. It was written by Melissa Mixon.

Faculty and students at the Cockrell School of Engineering are developing ways for cancer patients and children born with facial deformities to make more informed decisions about which
Read More …

Friday, July 16, 2010

The university has an app for that

You could call it The University of Texas at Austin’s app store.

Bugao Xu developed a way to make a three dimensional body scan.

Bugao Xu developed a way to make a three dimensional body scan.

It’s the list of technologies developed by university researchers that are available for commercialization.

Want to give a drop of blood to see if you have cancer? There’s an app for that.

Want a three dimensional scan of your body? Hey, there’s an app for that.

Want to speed up the growth of your tomatoes? There’s an app for that.

Need a flexible e-reader or
Read More …

Wednesday, November 26, 2008

Engineering professor gets Wired

Adela Ben-Yakar, an assistant professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering, is featured in an article in the December 2008 edition of Wired magazine and on the magazine’s Web site.

She is developing laser microscalpels that would be able to excise a cancerous cell without damaging neighboring cells.

We wrote about her work for a Campus Cameo in the Playbook program distributed at Longhorn football games. It was in the Oct. 25 edition (the Oklahoma State game). For those of you who
Read More …