University of Texas at Austin

Posts Tagged ‘carbon’


Wednesday, June 8, 2011

Research Roundup Spring 2011: Black holes, subsurface fjords, early mammal brains and more

In the last few months, researchers at The University of Texas at Austin dealt with black holes, dead zones and ice kilometers under the surface of Antarctica.

They found that early mammals evolved bigger brains for the sense of smell. They found that alcohol helps a brain to remember.

They made a carbon “sponge” that could store energy and a $1 biosensing diagnostic device that’s self-powered.

They found that teenagers who don’t fit in are less likely to go for higher education.

To help
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Friday, May 13, 2011

Carbon “sponge” could charge supercapacitors

University of Texas at Austin collaborators Meryl Stoller, Dr. Yanwu Zhu and Dr. Rodney Ruoff stand with a 3-D model of the new carbon material they have created.

University of Texas at Austin collaborators Meryl Stoller, Dr. Yanwu Zhu and Dr. Rodney Ruoff stand with a 3-D model of the new carbon material they have created.

Researchers at The University of Texas at Austin’s have created a new porous, three-dimensional carbon that can be used as a greatly enhanced supercapacitor, holding promise for energy storage in everything from energy grids and electric cars to consumer electronics.

The significance of the discovery is the potential it offers for enabling supercapacitors to
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Wednesday, May 19, 2010

Can America run on natural gas?

At her departure, Castlen Kennedy was joined by Professor Chip Groat, left, and Paul Wilson, a vice president of Texas Gas Service, a sponsor of the trip.

At her departure, Castlen Kennedy was joined by Professor Chip Groat, left, and Paul Wilson, a vice president of Texas Gas Service, a sponsor of the trip.

Castlen Kennedy got an unusual start to the research for her master’s degree thesis: A group of people gathered on Wednesday (May 18, 2010) to wish her good-bye and good luck.

Kennedy was not, as she noted, headed into the library.

Rather, she and a friend hit the road in a vehicle powered by compressed natural
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