University of Texas at Austin

Posts Tagged ‘engineering’


Wednesday, November 30, 2011

Texas collaboration started with lunch in Wisconsin

Adela Ben-Yakar, an engineering professor, and Jon Pierce-Shimomura, a neurobiology professor, have teamed up develop technology to test drugs for neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's.

Adela Ben-Yakar, an engineering professor, and Jon Pierce-Shimomura, a neurobiology professor, have teamed up to develop technology to test drugs for neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s.

Scientific collaborations across disciplines can be great when they happen.

Researchers bring different skills, expertise and perspectives that can illuminate hard problems.

But just bringing different disciplines together can be a hard problem in itself, despite work being done by universities to break down the siloes that contain them.

So we wondered how Adela Ben-Yakar, a professor in the
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Monday, May 23, 2011

How changing the world got started

In remarks at a panel on the research mission of universities, Dr. J. Tinsley Oden showed this sampling of the research going on at the Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences at The University of Texas at Austin. It ranges from predicting the paths of hurricanes to laser surgery on cancer cells.

In remarks at a panel on the research mission of universities, Dr. J. Tinsley Oden showed this sampling of research going on at the Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences at The University of Texas at Austin. It ranges from predicting the paths of hurricanes to laser surgery on cancer cells.

Dr. J. Tinsley Oden, director of the Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences at The University of Texas at Austin, highlighted the development of universities as research institutions in this remarks. He
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Wednesday, November 17, 2010

Student research: Fastrac satellite to launch

Current members of the FASTRAC team and their adviser, Prof. Glenn Lightsey, middle row, far right.

Current members of the FASTRAC team and their adviser, Prof. Glenn Lightsey, middle row, far right.

A satellite designed and built by engineering students from the Cockrell School of Engineering at The University of Texas at Austin is to be launched. The scheduled date is Nov. 19, 2010.

The launch comes seven years after a group of engineering students entered a competition to build a satellite and five years after the students’ design was chosen. About 150 students have participated in the
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Monday, May 24, 2010

Crunching the numbers on the Ike Dike

Clint Dawson at the Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences is running computer simulations to test the feasibility of an extended seawall, in green, red and blue, along the Gulf Coast neaer Galveston Island.

Clint Dawson at the Institute for Computational Engineering Sciences is running computer simulations to test the feasibility of an extended seawall near Galveston Island.

Would the Ike Dike, a wall 17 feet high and 60 miles long along the Gulf Coast, protect Galveston Bay from strong hurricanes?

A group of researchers at the Institute of Computational Engineering and Sciences (ICES) at The University of Texas at Austin is trying to answer to that question by running sophisticated computer simulations to see what would
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Wednesday, April 29, 2009

Exploring explosions

Visualization of a large jet fuel pool fire in a cross flow that is heating a suspended cylindrical container.

Visualization of a large jet fuel pool fire in a cross flow that is heating a suspended cylindrical container.

A story on the Web site of the Texas Advanced Computing Center (TACC) is about research to model explosions. It highlights the work of Charles Wright, a chemistry professor at the University of Utah, who is using TACC’s Ranger computer.

Experiments on explosions can be tricky, but they’re no piece of cake to model on a computer. The story explains: Explosions are particularly challenging
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Wednesday, November 26, 2008

Engineering professor gets Wired

Adela Ben-Yakar, an assistant professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering, is featured in an article in the December 2008 edition of Wired magazine and on the magazine’s Web site.

She is developing laser microscalpels that would be able to excise a cancerous cell without damaging neighboring cells.

We wrote about her work for a Campus Cameo in the Playbook program distributed at Longhorn football games. It was in the Oct. 25 edition (the Oklahoma State game). For those of you who
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