University of Texas at Austin

Posts Tagged ‘mathematics’


Tuesday, November 23, 2010

Random sampling as good at terror screenings as racial profiling, prof says

This post originated in a paper that Prof. William Press published in Significance.

William Press

William Press

Stop using racial profiling, says Professor William Press of The University of Texas at Austin.

He claims that as well as being politically and ethically questionable, racial profiling does no better in helping law enforcement officials in their task of catching terrorists than standard uniform random sampling techniques.

This is the topic of a paper in Significance, the magazine of the Royal Statistical Society and the American Statistical Association.

Press previously
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Thursday, November 11, 2010

Here’s the story on the computational engineering and science certificate program at ICES

Undergraduate students who want to be America’s next top modeler can step toward that goal through an undergraduate certificate program at the Institute for Computational Engineering and Science (ICES).

First, understand that we’re talking about someone who programs models and runs simulations on a computer and not someone who struts down a runway—not that they are mutually exclusive.

But for those who want to develop models of physical systems, the Certificate in Computational Science and Engineering might be the ticket.

In the program, the students
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Friday, August 27, 2010

Supercomputing on the coffee maker power diet

These students will try to build a supercomputer that runs on 26 amps. They are, from left, Bethany Barrientos, Phillip Verheyden, Vladimir Coxall, Loren Micheloni, Alex Heinzmann. Jason Kilman is not pictured

These students will try to build a supercomputer that runs on 26 amps. They are, from left, Bethany Barrientos, Phillip Verheyden, Vladimir Coxall, Loren Micheloni, Alex Heinzmann. Jason Kilman is not pictured

You’re going to blow a fuse if you get too many kitchen appliances going at the same time.

So you really don’t want to plug in a power hungry supercomputer between the toaster oven and the coffee maker. Your entire zip code – or more – could go dark.

But it
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Wednesday, June 2, 2010

Tate picks up Abel Prize

John Tate, left, gets a hand from King Harald of Norway after presentation of the Abel Prize/Photo: Scanpix/Berit Roald, The Abel Prize/The Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters

John Tate, left, gets a hand from King Harald of Norway after presentation of the Abel Prize/Photo: Scanpix/Berit Roald, The Abel Prize/The Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters

John Tate, a professor emeritus of mathematics at The University of Texas at Austin, received the Abel Prize on May 25, 2010 from King Harald of Norway in a ceremony in Oslo.

The prize was awarded to Tate by the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters for his vast and lasting impact on the theory
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Friday, May 15, 2009

Getting Started–Michael Starbird

Michael Starbird

Michael Starbird

As part of Further Findings’ Getting Started series, Michael Starbird, a mathematics professor at The University of Texas at Austin, explains how he got involved with numbers.

“I was brought up in southern California and my father taught mathematics, physics and astronomy at a community college and he would bring mathematical and physics problems to the dinner table,” he said. “My brother and I talked about them.

“Mathematics was just a part of daily life. In fact, I often look back
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Tuesday, March 3, 2009

Behind NUMB3RS

“Murder and math. What could be better?”

That’s how Michael Starbird, professor of mathematics, describes his appreciation for the CBS show “Numb3rs.”

Starbird and “Numb3rs” (on CBS at 9 p.m. Fridays) came together at a recent Science Study Break, a series that connects the science in movies and television shows to real science. Past lectures include anthropologist John Kappelman on “Bones” and biologist David Hillis on “CSI.”

“Numb3rs,” in its fifth season, chronicles the adventures of Charles Eppes, a math genius and professor
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Wednesday, January 7, 2009

Math prizes add up

Luis Caffarelli

Luis Caffarelli

Luis Caffarelli has become the second mathematician from The University of Texas at Austin in two years to receive a Leroy P. Steele Prize from the American Mathematical Society (AMS). The Steele Prize is considered one of the top three prizes in mathematics.

The Steele Prize is actually three awards. Caffarelli’s was for lifetime achievement, the award that John Tate, a math professor, won in 1995. The university’s Karen Uhlenbeck received the prize for seminal research contribution in 2007.

The other Steele Prize
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