University of Texas at Austin

Posts Tagged ‘nasa’


Friday, August 23, 2013

Longhorns in Space, by Jupiter!

Scientists at the University of Texas at Austin’s Institute for Geophysics helped develop a blueprint for a possible future NASA lander mission to Europa, an icy moon of Jupiter that has a global ocean covered by an ice shell.

Europa’s large reservoir of liquid water has long enchanted planetary scientists with the possibility of harboring life. Many experts believe it to be the most likely place in our solar system besides Earth to host life today. The proposed mission is designed
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Monday, October 10, 2011

A gallery of GRACE images

The twin satellites of the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) constantly beam information back to Earth.

(See the full story on the University of Texas at Austin Web site).

The data arrives in scientists’ computers as screens full of numbers. The scientists transform the bit and bytes into images to help them, other researchers and policymakers better understand the information.

The principal investigator of the GRACE misson is Byron Tapley, director of the Center for Space Research and professor in the Cockrell School of
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Tuesday, February 1, 2011

The first Longhorn in space

Sam, the rhesus monkey, was launched on Dec. 4, 1959. He and Miss Sam, launched a month later, were trained at The University of Texas at Austin. Photo by NASA.

Sam, a Rhesus monkey, was launched on Dec. 4, 1959. He and Miss Sam, launched a month later, were trained at The University of Texas at Austin. Photo by NASA.

The 50th anniversary of the first primate shot into space by Americans was this week.

On Jan. 31, 1961, Ham, a chimpanzee, was launched 160 miles above the Earth. The chimp became something of a celebrity after a photo spread in Life magazine immortalized his flight.

The University of Texas at Austin didn’t have
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Friday, August 7, 2009

Before college, students do real research: Part 1

The Science & Engineering Apprenticeship Program at the university’s Applied Research Laboratories (ARL:UT) is a competitive program for graduating seniors from primarily Austin area high schools. The apprentices receive hands-on experience in laboratory research and development projects during the summer before they begin college.

Twenty one students are participating in the program this summer–16 at ARL:UT and five at the university’s Institute for Advanced Technology.

Two of the apprentices have shared their summer experiences with Further Findings. First up is Jay Kapoor. We’ll hear from
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Friday, July 10, 2009

How Glen Evans settled the dustup over moon dust

To mark the 40th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing, Further Findings is highlighting ways The University of Texas at Austin and its people touched or were touched by the mission. Know of others? Let us know.

Glen EvansThe moon is covered with a layer of dust. NASA scientists and engineers knew that much.

But there was a hot debate about the depth of the dust.

The thin dusters thought there was a thin layer of dust that would not interfere with the
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Thursday, July 2, 2009

Apollo 11 and the Texas laser rangers

To mark the 40th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing, Further Findings is highlighting ways The University of Texas at Austin and its people touched or were touched by the mission. Know of others? Let us know.

Peter Shelus was visiting The University of Texas at Austin campus in 1971, attending an astronomy conference. More important, he was looking for a job.

He was completing a post-doc assignment at the Manned Space Center (now Johnson Space Center) in Houston and job
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Friday, February 13, 2009

GRACE in crowded space

Byron Tapley, head of the GRACE mission

Byron Tapley, head of the GRACE mission

The collision of two satellites 500 miles above the Earth created more than 600 pieces of debris and sent shock waves through satellite operators around the world.

We asked Byron Tapley, director of the Center for Space Research in the Cockrell School of Engineering, if there’s concern about the GRACE mission.

GRACE stands for Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment. It is a joint operation of NASA and the German Center for Air and Space Flight. Tapley is
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Wednesday, October 29, 2008

Notes on NASA and UT, 50 years and counting

I was walking down the hall of the administration building at NASA Ames Research Center in Mountain View, Calif., when I saw an oil portrait of what appeared to be a familiar face. I looked more closely at the face and then at the identification and it was, indeed, Hans Mark, current professor of engineering at The University of Texas at Austin.

Mark was the director of the NASA-Ames from 1969-1977 and chancellor of the University of Texas System from 1984-1992.
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