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The University of Texas at Austin Accolades Press Clippings Staff Spotlight UT In Focus News Briefs Web Watch Archives
Back To On Campus Home September 2007 Volume 33, Issue 11 Home

WEB WATCH

Online exhibit explores excavations of 18th-century Texas city

 A trading session between a French trader and his Caddo partners A.D.1750, illustrated by Charles Shaw. A trading session between a French trader and his Caddo partners A.D.1750, illustrated by Charles Shaw.

TexasBeyondHistory.net, a virtual museum produced by the university’s Texas Archeological Research Laboratory (TARL), has introduced a new online exhibit, “Los Adaes: 18th- Century Spanish Capital of Texas” at www.texasbeyondhistory.net/adaes/. The exhibit features findings from recent excavations at the Los Adaes site near Robeline, La.

At the time of Los Adaes’ prominence from 1729 to 1770, the Spanish and French vied for control over the territory west of the Mississippi River. Though the Spanish crown forbade Los Adaes settlers to engage in commerce with their French rivals, frontier necessity and opportunity led to contraband trade among the Spanish, French and Caddo Indians.

When Spain abandoned the settlement in 1773, its inhabitants, known as Adaesenos, were forcibly relocated to the new Texas capital, San Antonio. Some descendants of the original Spanish population of Los Adaes now live in Nacogdoches, Texas. The Los Adaes site has proven to be one of the most important archeological sites for the study of colonial Spanish culture and the unique relationship among the Spanish, French and Caddo.

“We hope the new Los Adaes exhibit and the activities in our virtual museum will spark interest in Texas’ 13,500-year cultural heritage,” said Susan Dial, co-editor of TexasBeyondHistory.net. “The interactive time-travel adventures with Dr. Dirt, the armadillo archeologist, are a fun way for parents to keep kids learning during the summer, so that when they head back to school in the fall they’ll be ahead of the game. The site also is a great resource for planning day trips to historic sites.”

Cyclists write about 4,500-mile trek on Web site

Daniel Kietzer works on his bike as he prepares to leave for the Texas 4000 trip. Kietzer is one of four cyclists featured on the university’s Texas 4000 for Cancer Web site who are blogging their way across the United States from Austin to Anchorage.  Photo: Christina Murrey Daniel Kietzer works on his bike as he prepares to leave for the Texas 4000 trip. Kietzer is one of four cyclists featured on the university’s Texas 4000 for Cancer Web site who are blogging their way across the United States from Austin to Anchorage.
Photo: Christina Murrey

Texas 4000 for Cancer hosts the longest annual charity bike ride in the world, leading 45 cyclists from Austin to Anchorage to raise money and awareness for the fight against cancer.

Throughout the summer four featured cyclists and university students are posting blogs of their adventures.

Miguel Corona and Peyton Coker are riding the Coastal Route while Claire Olsen and Daniel Kietzer are biking the Rockies Route.

Corona is a second-year student seeking a degree in mathematics, Kietzer is a third-year Anthropology major, Olsen is a College of Education senior majoring in kinesiology and Coker is a third-year Government major.

Texas 4000 participants, most of whom are students at the university, are chosen by application.

The majority have had direct experience with cancer, whether they have survived it themselves, witnessed friends and family fighting it, or have lost loved ones to it.

Once accepted, participants must raise $4,000 for cancer research, ride 1,000 miles in training and complete a 100-mile ride before the departure date. Twice-weekly training sessions help prepare them for the summer.

The four bloggers have raised a combined total of about $18,000 and as of June 26 rode 4,800 miles, a combined total of all four riders.

The ride ends on Aug. 10 when the cyclists arrive in Anchorage, Alaska.

Read more about the Texas 4000 at www.texas4000.org.