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What is RSS?

RSS feed for latest university news RSS feed for university news from Office of Public Affairs: http://www.utexas.edu/news/feed/.

What is RSS?

RSS stands for “Really Simple Syndication” and can help you stay up to date on the latest news from The University of Texas at Austin.

RSS feeds allow you to identify the content you would like to receive from your favorite Web sites and blogs, and then have that content delivered directly to you through a browser, Web-based news reader or desktop news reader.

How do I start using RSS feeds?

The first step is to select a news reader (also called a news aggregator) or determine if your favorite browser has RSS capability.

There is an almost limitless selection of news readers to choose from. Some are Web-based and can be accessed using your favorite browser, while others are downloadable applications that you then access from your desktop. All news readers in some way will allow you to subscribe to and then display the RSS feeds you’re interested in.

Browsers such as Firefox, Opera and Safari have built-in functionality which can automatically detect and pick up RSS feeds for you. For example, Firefox Live Bookmarks do this, and Safari RSS provides a similar feature.

Once you select a news reader or browser, you can then decide what content you would like to subscribe to. Visit your favorite University of Texas at Austin Web sites to check if they syndicate their content. Some Web sites identify their RSS feeds with a small orange icon that has the acronym “RSS” or “XML” on the graphic. Others use the small orange icon used by Firefox, for example, in the Web address bar to indicate when an RSS feed is available on a Web page.

More Web sites at The University of Texas at Austin that provide syndicated content include:

There are also RSS directory Web sites, such as Syndic8 and Feedster, that you can use to search for RSS feeds based on the topics you’re interested in. Technorati can also help you find blogs that may be syndicated.

All you need to subscribe to the syndicated content is the Web address, or URL, for the site’s RSS feed. You can subscribe to the RSS feed in a couple of ways. You can drag the URL of the RSS feed into your news reader or copy and paste that URL into a new feed in your news reader. Some sites even have buttons or graphics for their RSS feeds that correspond to a specific Web-based news reader and allow you to subscribe that way. Or you can use a browser that has the built-in RSS functionality to recognize and then subscribe to feeds.

How do I get a news reader?

Many different news readers are available. There are free Web-based and downloadable applications out there, while others require a subscription fee or software purchase.

If you download a news reader application to your desktop, make sure you choose one that is compatible with your operating system.

You can find available news readers using your favorite search engine. Web sites that provide lists of the many news readers out there include:

Using RSS feeds on your Web site

We encourage the use of Office of Public Affairs RSS feeds for personal, noncommercial use.

However, we do require that proper attribution to the university be used wherever the content appears. The attribution text should read “The University of Texas at Austin News” or “News from The University of Texas at Austin.”

The Office of Public Affairs reserves the right to stop the distribution of content through RSS feeds at any time. The Office of Public Affairs does not accept any liability for its RSS feeds.


  Updated 16 February 2010
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