Family and Social Policy

The Effectiveness of Various Texas Child Support Collection Strategies

Researcher(s):Deanna Schexnayder, Jerome Olson, Jennifer Beck, Ying Tang, Hyunsub Kum, Daniel Schroeder, Patricia Norman, and Daniel P. O'Shea
Date Published:
February 2001
Publisher(s):
Ray Marshall Center for the Study of Human Resources, The University of Texas at Austin

Abstract: This report studies the effectiveness of several child support collection strategies in increasing the total amount of child support collected from the noncustodial parents on its caseload. Three of these strategies are analyzed in the following chapters of this report. They include:

  1. Increasing the child support ‘pass-through’ to families receiving Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF)
  2. Arresting noncustodial parents who are delinquent in their child support payments through a coordinated effort known as a ‘round-up’
  3. Participating in an ‘access and visitation’ program when conflict among the parents created the need for some type of supervised visitation or exchange.

Included are findings and policy implications of all these child support collection strategies for low-income families.

Availability:

Full Report (PDF)
Executive Summary (PDF)
Executive Summary (HTML) Printed Copies: 99pp, $9.50
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The Effectiveness of Non-Custodial Parent Referrals to Workforce Services in Bexar and Harris Counties: An Initial Assessment

Researcher(s):Daniel P. O’Shea, Christopher T. King, Daniel Schroeder and Patricia Norman
Date Published:
January 2001
Publisher(s):
Ray Marshall Center for the Study of Human Resources, The University of Texas at Austin

Abstract: Child Support Division administrators and staff worked with local workforce and domestic court collaborators to establish procedures for service referrals from the courts as part of child support adjudication. Referrals are frequently a condition of probation for non-payment of child support or contempt of court. In addition to mandatory, court-based referrals, Child Support Division staff in Harris County initiated voluntary referrals from the child support offices.

This report assesses the effect on child support collections of referring non-custodial parents from the Texas Office of the Attorney General’s Child Support Division and Family Law Courts to workforce and other services designed to increase their income-producing and parenting capacities in Bexar County (San Antonio) and Harris County (Houston), Texas.

Availability:

Full Report (PDF)
Executive Summary (PDF)
Executive Summary (HTML) Printed Copies: 93pp, $9.00
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The Welfare Caseload, Economic Growth and Welfare-to-Work Policies: An Analysis of Five Urban Areas

Researcher(s):Peter R. Mueser, Julie L. Hotchkiss, Christopher T. King, Phillip S. Rokicki, and David W. Stevens
Date Published:
April 2000
Publisher(s):
Ray Marshall Center for the Study of Human Resources, The University of Texas at Austin

Abstract: This paper uses quarterly data on AFDC (later TANF) recipients in five major urban areas to examine the relative importance of policy reform and economic conditions in explaining the dynamics of the welfare caseload and the employment experiences of welfare leavers. We find that both increases in exits as well as reductions in entry to welfare played an important role in the caseload declines of the 1990s. However, in contrast to previous research, we find that economic conditions are less important in explaining the decline than policy or related changes.

Consistent with the welfare-to-work ideal underlying reform efforts, we find that welfare reforms were accompanied by substantial increases in the employment of those leaving welfare. However, this appears to be largely the result of an increasingly tight labor market rather than the reforms. We conclude that although an economic recession would not boost TANF caseloads to prior levels, it would seriously jeopardize the goal of increasing self-sufficiency of former welfare recipients through employment.

Availability:

Full Report (PDF)
Printed Copies: 53pp, $5.30
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Welfare-to-Work Transitions in Five Urban Areas: Initial Results from the Pooled Multivariate Analysis

Researcher(s):Jerome A. Olson, Christopher T. King, Julie L. Hotchkiss, Peter R. Mueser, Phillip S. Rokicki, and David W. Stevens
Date Published:
March 2000
Publisher(s):
Ray Marshall Center for the Study of Human Resources, The University of Texas at Austin

Abstract: In 1998, the U.S. Department of Labor’s Employment and Training Administration, Division of Research and Demonstration awarded funding to an alliance of five state university partners to conduct research on welfare-to-work transitions in five large urban areas: Atlanta, GA; Baltimore, MD; Ft. Lauderdale, FL; Houston, TX; and Kansas City, MO. The objective of this phase of the analysis was to identify and explain similarities and differences in the welfare-to-work transition profiles of adult female welfare recipients in the five urban sites. The data were used to fit reduced-form regression models in which outcomes were dependent on exogenous (or predetermined) variables. This approach to organizing the data was based on the seminal work of Boskin and Nold (1975) that has become one of the standard approaches of event history analysis. This report demonstrated the feasibility of pooling large welfare datasets for cross-urban analyses of welfare and work patterns. A comparison of the descriptive statistics and regression coefficients has shown both commonalities and differences among the states and the urban sites that are intuitively plausible.

Availability:

Full Report (PDF)
Printed Copies: 33pp, $3.30
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Urban Welfare-to-Work Transitions in the 1990s: A First Look

Urban Welfare-to-Work Transitions in the 1990s: A First Look

Researchers: Christopher T. King, Julie L. Hotchkiss, Peter R. Mueser, Phillip S. Rokicki and David W. Stevens.
Publication Date: December 1999, U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration, Office of Policy and Research, Division of Research and Demonstration. 41pp.
Availability: Available from the Ray Marshall Center, contact This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .
 


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