Workforce Development

The Workforce Investment Act in Eight States

The Workforce Investment Act in Eight States

Researcher(s):
Burt S. Barnow and Christopher T. King
Date:
February 2005
Publisher:
Nelson A. Rockefeller Institute of Government, Albany, NY
Publication Type:
Full Report (PDF) and Executive Summary (PDF)

Abstract: This report concluded a two-year study of workforce service delivery in eight states, 16 local areas, and more than 30 local One-Stop Career Centers operating under the auspices of the federal Workforce Investment Act (WIA) of 1998. The purpose of this study was to provide useful information for both national policymakers in the Executive Branch and Congress for WIA and related reauthorizations (e.g., Perkins, TANF) and for program administrators and policy researchers. The research was designed to enhance understanding of the way workforce service delivery has been operating across the United States. The five major topics which the study addressed were: (1) leadership, including the role of employers and the private sector; (2) system administration and funding; (3) organization and operation of One-Stop Career Centers; (4) service orientation and mix; and (5) the use of market mechanisms such as the Eligible Training Provider (ETP) list, performance standards, and Individual Training Accounts (ITAs).


 

Welfare and Work: Experiences in Six Cities


Authors: Christopher T. King and Peter R. Mueser.
Date: January 2005
Publisher: W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research, Kalamazoo, MI.
Publication Type: Report
. 200pp.
Availability: Available for purchase from the W.E. Upjohn Institute at this link.
 

Mapping and Improving State Workforce Development Systems: Lessons from Five States

Mapping and Improving State Workforce Development Systems: Lessons from Five States

Researcher(s): Sarah Looney and Christopher T. King
Date:
August 2004
Publication Type:
Full Report (PDF)

 

Proposed Performance Measures and State Responses: Analysis and Next Steps

Proposed Performance Measures and State Responses: Analysis and Next Steps

Researcher(s):Christopher T. King and Sarah Looney
Date Published:
June 2004
Publication Type:
Full Report (PDF)

Abstract: Ray Marshall Center researchers provided an analysis of proposed performance measures for the U.S. Department of Labor’s Integrated Performance Information (IPI) Project. Researchers used feedback surveys from state participants to summarize advantages, disadvantages and brief discussions on 30 proposed measures of the workforce investment programs and the One-Stop Career Center. Based on participants' responses, RMC researchers identified seven measures as the top candidates for adoption as part of the IPI Project: outcomes for employers and the economy, labor market outcomes for program participants, social welfare outcomes, return on investment, customer satisfaction, skill gains and others. The final measures selected by the participants will be discussed in a forthcoming paper, "Integrated Performance Information for Workforce Development System Planning, Oversight, and Management," authored by Bryan Wilson of the Washington State Workforce Training and Education Coordinating Board.

 

Another Tale of Two Cities: What Two Capital City, University Towns Can Learn From Each Other

Another Tale of Two Cities: What Two Capital City, University Towns Can Learn From Each Other

Researcher:
Andy Redman
Date:
May 2004
Publication Type:
Professional Report (
Full Report). Contact This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it for printed copies.
Another Tale of Two Cities: A Summary of the Lessons Learned: What Two Capital City, University Towns Can Learn From Each Other (summary report) (PDF)

Abstract: This is the tale of how Austin, Texas, and Baton Rouge, Louisiana, two college-town, state capitals, diverged during the past thirty years so much that Austin now has twice as many jobs and people as Baton Rouge. What were the causes for such a dramatic growth in Austin? In spite of the initial similarities, why has Baton Rouge not kept up with the Texas capital? The author explores these questions by trying to explain the factors that have led to slower growth in Baton Rouge compared to Austin. His key findings and recommendations are based on an in depth comparison of the Austin and Baton Rouge Metropolitan Statistical Areas using literature, data, interviews, and other resources to analyze the following areas: demographic characteristics, the history of leadership and development, the economy and cost of doing business, and the education system.

 


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