Workforce Development

Workforce Potential Project: Analysis of Area Labor Market and Provider Capacity

The Workforce Potential Project: Analysis of Area Labor Market and Provider Capacity

Authors: Robert W. Glover, Dan O'Shea, Christopher T. King, Laura Stelling, and Richard Fonté
Date
: September 2012

Publisher
:
Ray Marshall Center for the Study of Humas Resources, The University of Texas at Austin
Publication Type:
Report

The Workforce Potential Project (WPP) is a joint effort of the Austin Area Research Organization (AARO) and the Ray Marshall Center. WPP is designed to equip area residents at least 25 years of age with a sub-baccalaureate degree or industry-recognized credential that qualifies them for demand occupations  paying $18 per hour or more in growth industry sectors.  The investment in local human capital fosters regional economic development, while improving employment and earnings of current residents.


 

The Local Investments in Workforce Development Evaluation: Travis County-funded 2009/2010 Participants Plus, Longer-Term Outcomes for Capital IDEA

The Local Investments in Workforce Development Evaluation: Travis County-funded 2009/2010 Participants Plus, Longer-Term Outcomes for Capital IDEA

Authors: Tara Smith, Kristin Christensen, Daniel G. Schroeder, Christopher T. King
Date
: December 2012

Publisher
:
Ray Marshall Center for the Study of Humas Resources, The University of Texas at Austin
Publication Type:
Report. 34 pp.

The Ray Marshall Center has produced a report that analyzes the outcomes of local workforce development services funded by Travis County.  In 2010, the County invested $1.91 million through ten providers that provide training and wrap-around programs that help lower income and disadvantaged workers develop workforce skills for long term career development.   The Local Workforce Services Evaluation draws on several data points in order to answer questions such as; “are services being delivered as planned?” and, “what outcomes are achieved?” The Ray Marshall Center analyzed employment data on 4,150 participants, collected before, during, and after their participation in the program.  Using employment and salary as the two primary performance measures for this evaluation, the Ray Marshall Center’s analysis shows positive results across the board, despite the fact that the country experienced a severe recession during the time-period under analysis.

 

The Evolution of the CareerAdvance® Program in Tulsa, Oklahoma

The Evolution of the CareerAdvance® Program in Tulsa, Oklahoma

Authors: Tara C. Smith, Rachel V. Douglas and Robert W. Glover

Date: October 2012

Publisher: Ray Marshall Center for the Study of Humas Resources, The University of Texas at Austin
Publication Type:
Report. 59 pp.

This report discusses the development and evolution of the CareerAdvance® program, which began in Tulsa in 2009 as the parent training portion of a two‐generation strategy to end the cycle of poverty in families with a child enrolled in Head Start or Early Head Start.
 

Dual-Generation Strategy Initiative Research Brief

Dual-Generation Strategy Initiative Research Brief
Author: Tara Smith
Date: February 2012
Publication Type: Research Brief (PDF, 4pp.)
 

Expanding the CareerAdvance® Program in Tulsa, Oklahoma

Expanding the CareerAdvance® Program in Tulsa, Oklahoma
(Prepared for the
Health Professionals Opportunity Program, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services)
Authors: Robert W. Glover; Christopher T. King, and Tara Carter Smith
Date: January 2012
Publication Type: Repor
t. 58pp.

This report, prepared for the Health Professionals Opportunity Program, Administration for Children and Families in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, and the George Kaiser Family Foundation, provides the background, rationale, and overview of the first year of implementation of the CareerAdvance® program. The program aims to improve family economic security by providing low-income parents of children in Tulsa's Head Start and Early Head Start programs with workforce development services and training in high-growthpotential sectors such as healthcare and nursing, in addition to adult education programs, peer support, and performance incentives. After the first year of implementation, early signs indicate participants showing high rates of completion.
 


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