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Dan Seedah

Dan Seedah

Research Fellow

(512) 232-3143

(512) 232-3153 FAX

dseedah@mail.utexas.edu


Mr. Seedah currently serves as a research fellow at the Center for Transportation Research at The University of Texas at Austin. He completed his Master of Science in engineering degree at the same university in December 2009. His areas of research include transportation infrastructure planning, infrastructure maintenance, transportation funding, supply chain operations, and intermodal freight movement. He is also experienced in the areas of experimental design, traffic simulation, data collection, data analysis, computer programming, and web and user interface development.

He was involved in the Freight Planning Factors Impacting Texas Commodity Flows study (TXDOT 0-6297) where he assisted with freight data analysis, examination of Texas commodity flows, and the development of the freight relational database. Mr. Seedah has also been involved in the development of the Vehicle Operating Cost Model (TXDOT Project 0-5974) where he has been the lead programmer for the final version of the model. As part of his contribution to the model, Mr. Seedah developed the five analysis types (Single Vehicle, Multi Vehicle, Fleet Vehicle , Growth Rate and Market Penetration Analysis, Route Analysis), an advanced maintenance scheme, vehicle utilization, costing modules,  and the drive cycle analysis modules which feed into the UT Fuel Economy Model.

Mr. Seedah developed the first generation intermodal rail costing model called CTRail and identified the various building blocks for which rail operations can be categorized. His work was presented at the 90th Annual Transportation Research Board meeting in 2011 and the 51st Transportation Research Forum in 2010. In addition, to the above, Mr. Seedah investigated the dry port concept and freight movement as part of his thesis work “Export Growth, Energy Costs, and Sustainable Supply Chains.”

Recent Studies

The University of Texas at Austin  •  UT's Cockrell School of Engineering