Research Alert | October 18, 2012

Research Alert
Research Alert

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Research Opportunities

Important University Research Deadlines

American Recovery and Reinvestment Act

The University of Texas at Austin Stimulus Package Web page is online.

Funding Sources

Department of Defense

DOD logo

Infectious Disease, Vaccine, Clinical Trials and Entomology Award
Deadline: Nov. 25, 2012

DARPA
Request for Information: Grand Challenges of the 21st Century
Deadline: Jan. 1, 2013

National Institutes of Health

Education Research in Sleep Health and Sleep-Circadian Biology
Deadlines: Letter of Intent, Jan. 2, 2013; Application, Feb. 1, 2013

New Directions in Hematology Research
Deadline: Feb. 5, 2013

Effects of adolescent binge drinking on brain development
Deadline: Feb. 5, 2013

Fatigability, Activity Limitations, and Bioenergetics in Aging
Deadline: Feb. 5, 2013

NASA

NASA Space Technology Research Fellowship - Fall 2013
Deadline: Dec. 4, 2012

National Science Foundation

David Laude

 

Materials World Network: Cooperative Activity in Materials Research between US Investigators and their Counterparts Abroad
Deadline: Nov. 14, 2012

Interdisciplinary Research in Hazards and Disasters
Deadline: Feb. 4, 2013

NSF Science, Engineering and Education for Sustainability Fellows
Deadline: Nov. 26, 2012

Nitrogen: Improving on Nature
Deadline: Feb. 1, 2013

Software Infrastructure for Sustained Innovation
Deadline: Jan. 14, 2013

Sedimentary Geology and Paleobiology
Deadline: Jan. 17, 2013

 

Arts, Humanities and Culture

National Park Service
2013 Prisoner of War Research Grant Program
Deadline: Dec. 14, 2012

Terra Foundation for American Art Europe
TERRA SUMMER RESIDENCY
Deadline: Jan. 15, 2013

American Academy of Arts and Sciences
Hellman Fellowship in Science and Technology Policy
Deadline: Jan. 11, 2013

Other Funding Opportunities

National Patient Safety Foundation
Research Grants Program
Deadlines: Letter of Intent, Nov. 6, 2012; Proposal, Feb. 27, 2013

American Sociological Association
ASA Congressional Fellowship-The Sydney S. Spivack Program in Applied Social Research and Social Policy
Deadline: Feb. 1, 2013

Research Prizes and Honors

[Have you or a colleague won a research-related prize or honor? Let the Research Alert know.]

Hamilton Awards Honor University Authors, Researchers

The Robert W. Hamilton Books Award were presented Oct. 16 and the top honors went to faculty members in psychology, physics and radio, television and film.

The awards are the highest of the university's honors for faculty and staff authors and researchers. The University Co-op sponsors the awards and the Office of the Vice President for Research Administers them.

James Pennebaker

James Pennebaker, professor in the Department of Psychology, won the top author's prize for his book, "The Secret Life of Pronouns." Pennebaker received $10,000 for the award. The book details Pennebaker's large-scale research about what our everyday use of words says about us.

Steven Weinberg

Steven Weinberg, professor in the departments of Astronomy and Physics, received the Career Research Excellence Award, which recognizes a faculty member's record of ground-breaking research at the university. The Career Research Excellence prize comes with $10,000.

Andrew Garrison

Andrew Garrison, associate professor in the Department of Radio, Television and Film, received the Creative Research Award for his documentary film, "Trash Dance." The movie followed choreographer Allison Orr as she worked with garbage haulers to stage a dance performance. The award comes with $5,000.

Elizabeth MuellerSarah Dooling

Elizabeth Mueller, associate professor, and Sarah Dooling, assistant professor, both in the School of Architecture, were awarded the $5,000 Best Research Paper Award for “Sustainability and Vulnerability: Integrating Equity into Plans for Central City Redevelopment." It was published in the Journal of Urbanism.

Four other authors were recognized for their books and received $3,000 each. They were:

  • John Abbott, senior lecturer in the School of Biological Sciences, "Damselflies of Texas: A Field Guide"
  • Circe Sturm, associate professor in the Department of Anthropology, "Becoming Indian: The Struggle Over Cherokee Identity in the 21st Century"
  • Raymond Neubauer, senior lecturer in the School of Biological Sciences, "Evolution and the Emergent Self: The Rise of Complexity and Behavioral Versatility in Nature"
  • Sheldon Ekland-Olson, professor and director of the School of Human Ecology, "Who Lives, Who Dies, Who Decides?: Abortion, Neonatal Care, Assisted Dying, and Capital Punishment."

 

News and Information

NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory Selects UT Austin as Research and Education Partner

The NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory has selected The University of Texas at Austin for its Strategic University Research Partnership program — a federally funded program focused on advancing space exploration.

The partnership will enable the university and JPL researchers to propose collaborative research and educational projects in strategic focus areas such as robotics, nanosatellites and high-precision mapping. The program also creates an employment pipeline for JPL's future workforce.The University of Texas at Austin is one of 12 universities that have been selected for this partnership.

Research Funding Available

 

Information and applications for all programs are available at the Vice President for Research website. Early application is recommended. Please direct questions to Liza Scarborough or 471-2877.

Quoted-UT Researchers in the News

Houston Chronicle: Texas on the Potomac blog
Oct. 17, 2012
HEADLINE: Analysis: Energized Obama stages a comeback

Bruce Buchanan (Bruce Buchanan, professor in the Department of Government, in commenting about the second presidential debate said the third debate could be the tiebreaker.)

Bruce Buchanan, a political scientist at the University of Texas, said Obama “passed Romney’s assertiveness and aggressiveness level” on Tuesday and “neutralized the dominance Romney had in the last debate.” “This debate leveled the playing field,” said Buchanan. “The question now is whether the third debate can be used by either man to recapture the advantage.”

Research Project

Analysis of Neurodegenerative Mechanisms in Down Syndrome

Jon Pierce-ShimomuraRESEARCHER: Jon Pierce-Shimomura, assistant professor, Section of Neurobiology, principal investigator
AGENCY: Research Down Syndrome
AMOUNT: $25,000

Down syndrome (DS) presents a range of neurological disabilities caused by overexpression of genes on the 21st chromosome. One of the most devastating is the development of early-onset Alzheimer’s disease (AD). This is due to the fact that individuals with DS carry additional copies of the APP gene. APP encodes a protein that is cleaved into several potentially toxic peptides, including Ab peptides that compose the plaques in the brains of AD patients. The accumulation of APP-related peptides is currently hypothesized to cause degeneration within a brain region that later spreads through defective processing of a protein called TAU. Major questions in AD include: “Why does a select subset of cholinergic-type neurons die first that are important in memory?“ and “How does the wave of degeneration spread throughout the brain?” 

These questions remain challenging to answer with conventional mouse models of AD due to the ambiguity of onset and the difficulty of non-invasively tracking degeneration.  To overcome these limitations, we have generated a novel model of APP-induced neurodegeneration using the powerful genetic model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.  In our initial studies, we found that giving C. elegans a copy of the human APP gene causes degeneration of a select subset of cholinergic neurons in middle age just as in the human condition.

For this project, we will study conserved genes that modify the timing and pattern of neurodegeneration. Additionally, we will investigate whether this initial degeneration spreads as in human AD and whether it can be prevented via human pharmaceuticals.  Understanding the molecular basis for APP-induced degeneration will lead to discovery of drugs to stop degeneration and extend the life of those we love with DS.

  • John Abbott, senior lecturer in the School of Biological Sciences, for "Damselflies of Texas: A Field Guide"
  • Circe Sturm, associate professor in the Department of Anthropology, "Becoming Indian: The Struggle Over Cherokee Identity in the 21st Century"
  • Raymond Neubauer, senior lecturer in the School of Biological Sciences, "Evolution and the Emergent Self: The Rise of Complexity and Behavioral Versatility in Nature"
  • Sheldon Ekland-Olson, professor and director of the School of Human Ecology, "Who Lives, Who Dies, Who Decides?: Abortion, Neonatal Care, Assisted Dying, and Capital Punishment."
    • Funding is available for 2012-2013 Special Research Grants. Also, nominations for the Hamilton Book Award competition are being accepted.
      • SPECIAL RESEARCH GRANTS for 2012-2013 in amounts up to $750 are awarded to tenured and tenure-track faculty throughout the year until funds are expended. Applications are being accepted.
      • HAMILTON BOOK AWARDS PROGRAM is accepting all books, including scholarly monographs, creative works (e.g., novels and anthologies of poetry), exhibition catalogues, textbooks, and edited collections published in calendar year 2012 by university faculty and staff. Deadline is Jan. 18, 2013.
        • John Abbott, senior lecturer in the School of Biological Sciences, for "Damselflies of Texas: A Field Guide"
        • Circe Sturm, associate professor in the Department of Anthropology, "Becoming Indian: The Struggle Over Cherokee Identity in the 21st Century"
        • Raymond Neubauer, senior lecturer in the School of Biological Sciences, "Evolution and the Emergent Self: The Rise of Complexity and Behavioral Versatility in Nature"
        • Sheldon Ekland-Olson, professor and director of the School of Human Ecology, "Who Lives, Who Dies, Who Decides?: Abortion, Neonatal Care, Assisted Dying, and Capital Punishment."

        Funding is available for 2012-2013 Special Research Grants. Also, nominations for the Hamilton Book Award competition are being accepted.

        • SPECIAL RESEARCH GRANTS for 2012-2013 in amounts up to $750 are awarded to tenured and tenure-track faculty throughout the year until funds are expended. Applications are being accepted.
        • HAMILTON BOOK AWARDS PROGRAM is accepting all books, including scholarly monographs, creative works (e.g., novels and anthologies of poetry), exhibition catalogues, textbooks, and edited collections published in calendar year 2012 by university faculty and staff. Deadline is Jan. 18, 2013.

The Research Alert is an electronic publication from the Office of the Vice President for Research at The University of Texas at Austin. It includes news of research honors and awards, news of research programs and deadlines, researchers quoted in news media, a listing of funding opportunities and a look at a current research project. It is available by e-mail and on the Web.

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