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The Office of Research Support (ORS) does not administer or oversee HOP policy 5-2011* or training related to the policy. ORS administers HOP policy 7-1210, “Promoting Objectivity in Research by Managing, Reducing or Eliminating Financial Conflicts of Interest” so if you conduct research and have:

  1. Not submitted a Financial Interest Disclosure (FID), you will need to complete mandatory training and file a FID. Instructions for completing these requirements are located at http://www.utexas.edu/research/rsc/coi/training.html.
  2. Previously submitted a FID, you are not required to complete additional training nor re-disclose the same information to comply with the UTS 180/HOP 5-2011 policy requirements.   However, you may have other responsibilities under that policy.

*If you have questions concerning the other policy, HOP policy 5-2011, “Conflicts of Interest, Conflicts of Commitment, & Outside Activities,” you should contact the Provost’s Office evpp_coi@austin.utexas.edu.

Internet Research

IRBs are increasingly presented with research conducted over the internet.  The internet opens immense possibilities for data collection, analysis, and transmission.  However, it also poses unique and possibly unknown risks.  Contrary to popular belief, research conducted over the internet is not anonymous.  Internet research often increases the complexity of obtaining a signed informed consent.  However, the very nature of the internet and its blurred distinction between the public and private domains, questions the very interpretation and applicability of current policies and regulations for human subject research.  Please submit all human subjects research utilizing the internet for review.

For more information about internet research, see the following links.

Cover Letters

PDF FileReport: Ethical and Legal Aspects of Human Subjects Research on the Internet

PDF FileArticle: Human Subject Research and the Internet: Ethical Dilemmas