Skip to Main Content.
Human Subjects site of Office of Research Support link to UT home link to Office of Research Support

The Office of Research Support (ORS) does not administer or oversee HOP policy 5-2011 or training related to the policy. ORS administers HOP policy 7-1210, “Promoting Objectivity in Research by Managing, Reducing or Eliminating Financial Conflicts of Interest” so if you conduct research and have:

  1. Not submitted a Financial Interest Disclosure (FID), you will need to complete mandatory training and file a FID. Instructions for completing these requirements are located at http://www.utexas.edu/research/rsc/coi/training.html.
  2. Previously submitted a FID, you are not required to complete additional training nor re-disclose the same information to comply with the UTS 180/HOP 5-2011 policy requirements.   However, you may have other responsibilities under that policy.

HOP policy 5-2011 QUESTIONS? Contact the Provost’s Office evpp_coi@austin.utexas.edu or call Janet Dukerich, Senior Vice Provost for Faculty Affairs at (512) 232-3310.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

Last updated March 5, 2014



IBC FAQs

A. Protocols

1. What is an rDNA protocol?

An rDNA protocol is a document that describes a research or teaching activity that involves recombinant or synthetic nucleic acid molecules. This document must be completed by any investigator wanting to use recombinant or synthetic nucleic acid molecules, including transgenic animals in research or teaching activities. After completing the rDNA protocol form, it must be saved and submitted to the Institutional Biosafety Committee for review. Biosafety protocols are required with rDNA protocols involving infectious agents, sequences or genes from infectious agents or toxins, and the generation of transgenic plants or animals. Protocols must be given full approval prior to the use of recombinant or synthetic nucleic acid molecules or transgenic animals.

2. What is a Biosafety protocol?

A Biosafety protocol is a document that describes a research or teaching activity that involves biohazardous materials including: human fluids, tissue, or cells, recombinant or synthetic nucleic acid molecules, infectious agents, and toxins. This document must be completed by any investigator wanting to use biohazardous materials in research or teaching activities. Biosafety protocols are usually required with an rDNA protocol (see: What is an rDNA protocol? above). After completing the Biosafety protocol form, it must be saved and submitted to the Institutional Biosafety Committee for review. Protocols must be given full approval prior to the use or collection of biohazardous materials, infectious agents or toxins and recombinant or synthetic nucleic acid molecules.

3. Where can I find the forms for the rDNA or Biosafety protocols?

The rDNA and Biosafety protocol forms can be found on the Forms/IBC registration page.

4. Who can submit an rDNA or Biosafety protocol?

The IBC accepts protocols only from tenured, tenure track, or research faculty with assigned research space. Exceptions to this policy will be considered by the IBC on a case-by-case basis.

5. Where can I find the deadlines for submitting an rDNA or Biosafety protocol?

Submission deadlines are found on the meeting dates page.

6. Will my protocol still make the next meeting if I submitted it after the deadline?

Protocols submitted after the meeting deadline are held for the next meeting.

7. Who do I contact for a status report on my rDNA or Biosafety protocol?

Please contact the Office of Research Support (ORS).

B. Protocol Modifications

1. When is it necessary for me to modify, amend or make changes to my rDNA and/or Biosafety protocol?

Whenever you change the work described in your rDNA and/or Biosafety protocol, you need to update the protocol(s) to reflect the change(s). Protocol amendments are required with any change in host, vector or modified gene expression, any change in biohazardous materials, agents, or toxins used, and any change in procedures, location of your work, or to update IRB, IACUC, or IBC protocol numbers.

2. I have decided to add a new vector or host, what should I do?

To change or add a new vector or host, your rDNA protocol will need to be returned to allow access for changes. Your Biosafety protocol may also need to be returned to include the change. Contact the IBC Program Coordinator to return your protocol(s).

3. I need to add another transgenic strain to my existing colony, what should I do?

To change or add a new transgenic animal, your rDNA protocol may need to be returned to allow access for changes. Contact the IBC Program Coordinator regarding the status of the proposed addition.

4. I have decided to collect a different type of sample from my study participants, what should I do?

To change or add a type of sample from your study participant(s), you will need to update your Biosafety protocol. Your Biosafety protocol will need to be returned to allow access for changes. Contact the IBC Program Coordinator to return your protocol.

C. Approval and Annual Renewal

1. What is required for approval of my rDNA or Biosafety protocol?

The IBC requires completion of all IBC required training by the PI and lab personnel, current lab Biosafety Manual, and current lab inspection certifying the lab for work at or above the biocontainment level determined by the IBC for approval of the protocol(s).

2. What is the approval period for IBC protocols?

Most rDNA and Biosafety protocols are approved for one year. Some low risk rDNA protocols have up to a three year approval.

3. What should I do if the project is the same and nothing needs to change on the protocol?

If there are no changes to your protocol, including locations or updates to IACUC or IRB protocol numbers simply save and submit your protocol for review.

4. What should I do if I submitted a protocol for renewal but still need to add something?

If you have submitted your protocol for review but need to make a change, contact the IBC Program Coordinator to return your protocol for changes.

5. What should I do if my protocol has lapsed approval but I have not completed the project?

All research activities pertaining to the research described in the expired protocol must cease. Contact the IBC Program Coordinator immediately.

6. What should I do if I have completed the project and no longer need the rDNA protocol?

If you no longer need a rDNA protocol, contact the IBC Program Coordinator and your rDNA protocol will be removed from the active database.

7. What should I do if I have completed the project and no longer need the Biosafety protocol?

If you no longer need a Biosafety protocol, contact the IBC Program Coordinator and your Biosafety protocol will be allowed to lapse approval.

8. What should I do if I have duplicate rDNA or Biosafety protocols?

Duplicate protocols need to be removed from the active database even if they have not been submitted. If the protocols have been submitted, contact the IBC Program Coordinator to delete one from the database. If the protocol is a Biosafety protocol that has not been submitted, simply go to the bottom of the Biosafety form and select the “Delete” button. If the duplicate rDNA or Biosafety protocol has been previously approved, contact the IBC Program Coordinator BEFORE you delete your protocol.

D. General Questions

1. Where can I find out about the IBC Policies and Procedures?

All IBC Policies and Procedures are available online.

2. Who do I contact about other IBC questions?

Please contact the Office of Research Support with any questions.