Fire Prevention Services

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Fire Safety Awareness

There are general fire safety precautions you should follow regardless of where you live. Taking time to review tips about the following fire safety issues can help you create a safer and more secure living environment for you, your friends, and family.

Escape Plans

Because fire is a risk in every building — whether you sleep, study, or work there — you should always have an escape plan. You may need to escape within a few minutes of a fire’s start, so your safe exit depends on immediate warning from smoke alarms and advance planning of escape routes.

Escape Plan Basics

If your secondary escape route is a window…

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Smoke Alarms

There are thousands of home fires in the U.S. every year, which result in roughly 3,000 deaths annually. Almost half of these deaths resulted from fires that were reported between the hours of 11:00 p.m. and 7:00 a.m., the time period in which most people sleep. For this reason, providing smoke alarms in bedrooms may be the single most important step toward preventing fire-related casualties in residential buildings.

Smoke Alarm Basics

Smoke Alarm Installation

Smoke Alarm Maintenance

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Candles and Incense

Candles and incense are often used to create ambiance or help celebrate a special event, but they are open flames that pose a threat of fire. Most candle fires take place in the bedroom, and many occur when candles are left unattended. In addition, the winter holidays and New Year’s Eve are peak times for candle fires, so be sure to exercise caution when celebrating with open flames.

Candle and Incense Basics

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Cooking

Cooking fires are the leading cause of home fires and household fire injuries. Unattended cooking is the leading cause of these fires, most of which start with the ignition of common household items including grease, paper, cabinets and curtains.

Cooking Safety Basics

In the Event of Stovetop Fire:

In the Event of Oven Fire:

In the Event of Microwave Fire:

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Smoking

The respiratory health hazards of smoking are well-publicized, but a lesser-known fact is that smoking materials are the leading cause of fire-related deaths in the U.S. The most commonly ignited items in these fatal fires are mattresses and bedding, upholstered furniture, and floor coverings.

Smoking Fire Safety

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Electricity

Electrical distribution equipment poses serious fire safety threats that can even be fatal, especially when equipment is used incorrectly.

Electrical Safety Basics

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Extension Cords and Surge Suppressers

Halogen Lighting

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Heating Safety

Heating equipment is the leading cause of home fires during the winter months, and the second leading cause of home fires annually. Heating equipment includes fireplaces, wood stoves, portable space heaters, and fixed space heaters. Nearly half of all deaths attributed to home heating equipment fires involve portable space heaters. Follow the below tips, and read more about heating safety.

Heating Basics

Fireplaces and Wood-burning Stoves

Space Heaters

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Laundry

Laundry equipment is often overlooked when addressing the issue of home fire safety. However, laundry appliances pose a serious fire risk because they involve electricity, and the combination of combustible clothing and extremely hot temperatures. The vast majority of laundry fires are caused by dryers that are not cleaned properly.

Dryer Safety Basics

Lint Filters

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Gasoline

Each year gasoline causes several thousand household fires, many of which result in injury and even death. It is helpful to remember gasoline is a volatile liquid that is constantly releasing flammable vapors, which are heavier than air and accumulate at the lowest point in an area. If released inside a building, these vapors sink to floor level and spread out across the room, and if these vapors make contact with an ignition source a flash-fire will likely result.

Gasoline Safety Basics

In the Event of Gasoline Fire

Gasoline Storage

Fueling and Handling Gasoline

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Propane

Over 1,000 home fires are caused by liquid propane annually, and these fires cause hundreds of injuries and deaths. Propane is a flammable gas that is converted to a liquid before being stored within a cylinder or tank. When released from its container, propane converts back to a gas and expands significantly; if this expanding gas comes in contact with an ignition source an explosion can result. When first released, the gas is cold and heavier than the surrounding air, which creates a “cloud” of heavy gas that will stay close to the ground and collect in low areas.

Propane Safety Basics

These fire safety statistics and tips refer to fact sheets on the National Fire Protection Association Web site, the authoritative resource for fire prevention information online.

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