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"Academic Policies and Procedures" is published as several files. Use the links above to see the table of contents for the whole chapter, or other files within the chapter.


Reports

Semester reports from the registrar. Grade reports are sent to all students, except students in the School of Law, at the end of each semester and summer session. Reports are mailed to the student's permanent address on file in the Office of the Registrar.

Intrasemester reports from the deans.[1] About the middle of each semester (but not in the summer session), the faculty report undergraduate students doing work below the passing grade (D) to the deans, and the offices of the deans forward the reports to each student.

Scholastic Probation and Dismissal

Undergraduate Students

Scholastic probation and dismissal regulations apply to all undergraduate students except provisionally admitted freshmen until they have met the requirements for regular admission.

A student must maintain a minimum grade point average (GPA) at the University of Texas at Austin to remain academically eligible to register for the subsequent semester or summer session. The minimum average required varies with the total number of college credit hours attempted at the University of Texas at Austin and at other institutions.

Table of scholastic standards for continuance. The cumulative University grade point average is calculated on the basis of all work undertaken at the University of Texas at Austin, including credit by examination, correspondence, and extension, for which a letter grade is given. (The symbols Q, S, U, X, W, CR, and NC are not considered in calculating the grade point average.) Grades earned at any institution other than the University are not used in calculating the University grade point average, but semester hours of transfer credit accepted by the University are added to hours taken at the University to determine the total college hours undertaken.

Table of Scholastic Standards
Total College Hours
Undertaken
UT Austin GPA for
Scholastic Probation
UT Austin GPA for
Scholastic Dismissal

Below 15 less than 2.00 less than 1.50
15 - 44 less than 2.00 less than 1.70
45 - 59 less than 2.00 less than 1.85
60 or more less than 2.00 less than 2.00

Probation and dismissal. Rules governing scholastic probation and dismissal, as well as exceptions permitting continuance and special college regulations, are given below.

  1. Change of scholastic status. Scholastic status is determined when grades are reported at the end of each fall and spring semester and at the end of the entire summer session. Although a student's cumulative grade point average may change between these grade-reporting periods (e.g., by recording a final grade in place of an X), the student's scholastic status is not changed until the next official grade-reporting period during which the student is enrolled at the University.

  2. Effect of grades in courses repeated. All grades earned in University courses, whether repeated or not, count in a student's grade point average. However, in counting grade points for any semester, a student who earned a grade of at least C in a course taken in a previous semester may not use grade points earned in that same course in the current semester to meet minimum requirements for continuance without written permission from the dean.

  3. Scholastic probation. (a) A student whose cumulative University grade point average falls below 2.00 at the end of a grade-reporting period is placed on scholastic probation. Probationary status is reflected on the student's permanent academic record. (b) Any student returning to the University after a period of scholastic dismissal is on scholastic probation. (c) Under exceptional circumstances, the director of admissions may admit a student to the University on scholastic probation.

  4. Quantity of work while on scholastic probation. A student on scholastic probation must maintain at least twelve semester hours in a long-session semester unless the student's dean approves a reduced course load in writing before the student registers. Permission to take fewer than twelve hours is based on extenuating circumstances and is not routinely granted.

  5. Removal from scholastic probation. A student on scholastic probation who achieves a cumulative University grade point average of at least 2.00 at the end of a grade-reporting period during which he or she is registered at the University is removed from scholastic probation. Removal from probation is reflected on the student's permanent academic record.

  6. Effect of summer school on probationary status. No minimum course load is required of a student in the summer session. A student on scholastic probation who achieves a University grade point average of at least 2.00 at the end of the summer grade-reporting period is removed from probationary status. No student will be placed on scholastic dismissal at the end of a summer session unless the dismissal is the result of a previous condition prescribed by the student's academic dean.

  7. Scholastic dismissal. Under the conditions noted in items a, b, and c, a student is subject to scholastic dismissal at the end of a long-session semester. A student is not placed on scholastic dismissal at the end of a summer session unless the dismissal is the result of a previous condition prescribed by his or her academic dean. Scholastic dismissal is reflected on the student's permanent academic record.
    1. Any beginning student, freshman or transfer, who has not earned previous credit in residence at the University of Texas at Austin and who fails twelve or more semester hours of coursework in a long-session semester is subject to scholastic dismissal without a prior probationary period.
    2. To be subject to scholastic dismissal a student, except those beginning students described above, must first be placed on scholastic probation. A student on scholastic probation is subject to scholastic dismissal under either of the following conditions:
      1. At the end of a long-session semester, a student on scholastic probation who fails to attain the required cumulative grade point average as shown in the "Table of Scholastic Standards" will be dismissed from the University.
      2. A student on scholastic probation who withdraws from the University after the first four weeks of classes in a long-session semester will be placed on scholastic dismissal, unless the withdrawal is under exceptional conditions approved by the student's dean.
    3. When a student who has been dismissed from the University returns, he or she reenters on scholastic probation and may be subject to dismissal under the policies stated above in items (b)(i) and (ii).

  8. Student responsibility. A student who is dismissed from the University after completing registration for the next semester will have his or her registration canceled and may not attend classes. The student is responsible for knowing his or her scholastic status and may not appeal the cancellation of registration based on lack of such knowledge.

  9. Length of scholastic dismissal.
    1. First dismissal--one long-session semester and any intervening summer session.
    2. Second (and subsequent) dismissal--three calendar years, and readmission must be approved by the student's dean. A student dismissed for the third time will not normally be readmitted. A student dismissed for the fourth time is not eligible to apply for readmission.

  10. Effect of scholastic dismissal on correspondence courses or registration in another institution. A student who is dismissed from the University for scholastic reasons is not prohibited from taking courses by correspondence or from enrolling in another institution. The period of dismissal will not be decreased as a result of coursework completed while on dismissal.

  11. Exceptions permitting continuance in the University. Normally, a student subject to dismissal will be dismissed; however, each college and school within the University has an appeals procedure administered by the Office of the Dean. A student who wishes to appeal should contact the office of his or her academic dean for procedures and deadlines. In unusual circumstances a student may be allowed to continue subject to conditions prescribed by the dean. Approval to continue will not be given, regardless of the circumstances, unless the dean believes that the student has a reasonable chance of attaining a degree.

  12. Special college regulations. Each college and school in the University determines its own policies regarding the minimum academic standards required of its students. Any college or school may require a higher minimum grade point average than is required to avoid scholastic probation under University-wide rules. In addition, a college or school may restrict enrollment because of the limitation of instructional resources. A student may be ineligible to continue in a particular college or school while remaining eligible to transfer to another; however, no student on scholastic dismissal from the University may be enrolled in any academic program of the University.

Graduate Students

Registration in the Graduate School beyond the first semester or summer session depends on two factors: (1) satisfactory progress in absolving any admission conditions and (2) maintenance of a grade point average of at least 3.00. A graduate student whose overall grade point average falls below 3.00 at the end of any semester or summer session will be warned by the Office of Graduate Studies that continuance in the Graduate School is in jeopardy. The student must attain an overall average of at least 3.00 during the next semester or summer session he or she is enrolled or be subject to dismissal; during this period the student may not drop a course or withdraw from the University without the approval of the graduate adviser and the graduate dean.

A graduate student who has been dismissed may be readmitted for further graduate study only by petition of the Graduate Studies Committee in the student's major area or by the Graduate Studies Committee of another program that will accept the student. The petition must be approved by the dean of graduate studies.

Academic dismissal is reflected on the student's permanent record.

Honors

Except as noted, the following programs, scholarships, and organizations are open to all qualified undergraduates. Honors available through the colleges and schools are described in chapters 2 through 12 of The Undergraduate Catalog.

Honor Societies for Freshmen

Alpha Lambda Delta and Phi Eta Sigma are national honor societies that recognize scholastic attainment during the freshman year. New members are selected each fall and spring. Membership is offered to students who earn a grade point average of at least 3.50 during the first semester of their freshman year while completing at least twelve semester hours of coursework. Students who do not qualify during the first semester may become eligible by earning a grade point average of at least 3.50 for the first two semesters of work combined.

Phi Beta Kappa

Phi Beta Kappa, the oldest and best known honorary society in America, was founded by students at the College of William and Mary in 1776. The Alpha of Texas chapter was organized at the University in 1904. Eligibility is limited to upper-division students of the Colleges of Fine Arts, Liberal Arts, and Natural Sciences who achieve distinguished scholastic records while taking the Bachelor of Arts; the Bachelor of Arts in Art with a major in art history; the Bachelor of Arts in Theatre and Dance; or the Bachelor of Science in Biochemistry, Biology, Botany, Chemistry, Computer Sciences, Geological Sciences, Mathematics, Microbiology, Physics, or Zoology. The student must have completed at least sixty semester hours of coursework at the University.

Elections to Phi Beta Kappa are held in the fall and spring each year. Alumni members are occasionally selected from among graduates of at least five years' standing who have won appropriate distinction since graduation; honorary members are selected for special merit.

Phi Kappa Phi

Phi Kappa Phi is a national honor society recognizing academic achievement in all fields. Members are selected twice a year. Upper-division undergraduates are eligible for membership if they have completed at least one year of coursework at the University and have a University grade point average of at least 3.70. Juniors must have completed at least seventy-five semester hours of college coursework and must be in the top 5 percent of their class; seniors must have completed at least ninety semester hours of college coursework and must be in the top 7 percent of their class. Graduate students are also eligible for membership.

Leadership and Service Organizations

Mortar Board and Omicron Delta Kappa recognize and encourage scholarship, leadership, and service. Members of Mortar Board are chosen each spring; members of Omicron Delta Kappa are selected in the fall and in the spring.

British Marshall, Rhodes, and Truman Scholarships

British Marshall scholarships are for single United States citizens under the age of twenty-six on October 1 of the year of participation. Each scholarship offers two years or more of postgraduate study at any British university. Applications are due to the College of Liberal Arts in early September.

Rhodes scholarships are for single United States citizens between the ages of eighteen and twenty-four on October 1 of the year of application. Each scholarship offers two years or more of postgraduate study at the University of Oxford. Applications are due to the College of Liberal Arts in early September.

Harry S Truman Scholarships are awarded on merit to students who will be seniors the following academic year. Candidates must plan to pursue a career in public service. Each scholarship covers tuition, fees, books, and room and board, to a maximum of $3,000 for the student's senior year. In addition, Truman Scholars will receive $13,500 yearly if enrolled in a two-year graduate program or $9,000 yearly if enrolled in a three-year graduate program. Applications are due to the College of Liberal Arts in late October.

Junior Fellows Program

The Junior Fellows Program provides recognition for outstanding students who have completed four semesters, or approximately sixty semester hours of coursework. Chosen annually from about the top 1 percent of the student body, junior fellows are given the opportunity to do independent study and research with distinguished professors of their choice and to have that research supported by small grants, if necessary. The program is administered by the College of Liberal Arts, but undergraduates in all colleges and schools are eligible to take part. Students who wish to be considered should apply in February. Application forms are available in the office of Liberal Arts Interdisciplinary Programs.

College Scholars

On Honors Day each spring, the University designates outstanding students as College Scholars. To be designated a College Scholar a student must meet the following requirements:

  1. The student must be registered as an undergraduate for at least nine semester hours of coursework, unless he or she lacks fewer than nine hours to complete degree requirements. Students who hold an undergraduate degree are not eligible.

  2. The student must have been registered at the University at least once during the preceding calendar year.

  3. The student must have completed at least thirty semester hours of coursework at the University, excluding credit by examination, and at least sixty semester hours of college coursework, including transferred work and credit by examination.

  4. The student must have a University grade point average of at least 3.50.

Students eligible for recognition receive invitations to the Honors Day convocation approximately three weeks before Honors Day.

University Honors

Each semester, undergraduates who complete a full course load and earn outstanding grades are recognized by inclusion on the University Honors list. Each time a student is included on the list, his or her official record also shows the award of University Honors for that semester. The list is compiled at the end of the fall and spring semesters but not at the end of the summer session. To be included, a student must earn at least forty-five grade points and a grade point average of at least 3.50 and must have no incomplete grades (symbol X).

Students are notified on the semester grade report of their inclusion on the list.

Graduation with University Honors

To be eligible to graduate with University honors, an undergraduate must have completed at least sixty semester hours at the University of Texas at Austin. Graduation with University honors is based on the average of all grades earned in courses taken at the University, whether the courses were passed, failed, or repeated. Courses taken pass/fail are counted in the sixty-hour minimum, but only letter grades (including Fs in pass/fail courses) are used to determine the grade point average.

The faculty of each college or school determines the percentage of the graduating class of that division to receive honors, high honors, and highest honors and the minimum grade point average for each category, subject to the following requirements:

  1. No more than 20 percent of the May graduating class of each college or school may receive honors, high honors, and highest honors. No more than 10 percent of the class may receive high honors and highest honors. No more than 4 percent may receive highest honors.

  2. Honors graduates must have a University grade point average of at least 3.30.

The faculty may adopt college- or school-wide standards or may designate grade point average and percentage requirements for each program within the college or school, but the percentage of the college or school class receiving honors, high honors, and highest honors may not exceed those above.

Percentage requirements are not applied to August and December graduating classes. The grade point averages established for May graduates are applied to the following August and December classes to determine honors, high honors, and highest honors.

Honors High Honors Highest Honors
College or School Rank Min. GPA[2] Rank Min. GPA[2] Rank Min. GPA[2]

School of Architecture top 20% 3.30 top 10% 3.30 top 4% 3.30
College of Business Administration top 20% 3.50 top 10% 3.65 top 4% 3.80
College of Communication[3] top 20% 3.465 top 10% 3.665 top 4% 3.865
College of Education top 20% 3.50 top 10% 3.65 top 4% 3.80
College of Engineering[4] top 20% 3.50 top 10% 3.70 top 4% 3.85
College of Fine Arts[5] top 15% 3.30 top 10% 3.60 top 2% 3.85
College of Liberal Arts top 20% 3.30 top 10% 3.667 top 4% 3.867
College of Natural Sciences top 20% 3.30 top 10% 3.667 top 4% 3.867
School of Nursing top 20% 3.30 top 10% 3.30 top 4% 3.30
College of Pharmacy top 20% 3.30 top 10% 3.30 top 4% 3.30
School of Social Work top 20% 3.30 top 10% 3.30 top 4% 3.30

Teacher Certification

Students who complete teacher certification programs must meet the requirements enacted by the Seventieth Legislature and recorded in sections 13.036 through 13.039 of the Texas Education Code.

To be recommended for a certificate to teach in elementary or secondary schools, an undergraduate student must earn a degree as well as complete an approved teacher certification program. The following requirements for approved programs are to be completed in conjunction with degree requirements: (1) Enrollment. Students seeking secondary certification must earn a degree from the college or school that houses the academic program in their prospective teaching field. Students should be advised by the teacher preparation adviser in their academic department and should confirm that the courses for which they register are applicable to their certification program. Students seeking certification to teach at the elementary school level must register in the College of Education and major in an interdisciplinary program, Applied Learning and Development. (2) Admission to the professional sequence. Approval of a formal application, due by a specific deadline, is required before a student may take professional education courses. Admission requirements include the completion of seventy-two semester hours of college credit including certain prerequisite courses, a University grade point average of at least 2.50 and a cumulative grade point average on work taken at other institutions of at least 2.50, a passing score on the Texas Academic Skills Program (TASP) Test (unless exempt on the basis of SAT, ACT, or TAAS Test scores), and the submission of a complete application, including an essay. Applicants with a University grade point average of 3.00 or higher receive priority in selection. (3) Exit test. An individual seeking certification, including one who holds a valid out-of-state certificate, is required to achieve a satisfactory level of performance on the Examination for the Certification of Educators in Texas (ExCET) to be approved for the provisional or professional teacher's certificate, for additional teaching fields or areas of specialization, or for endorsements. (4) Legal questions. In accordance with article 6252-13c, Texas Civil Statutes, the commissioner of education may suspend or revoke a teaching certificate, or refuse to issue a teaching certificate for a person who has been convicted of a felony or misdemeanor for a crime that directly relates to the duties and responsibilities of the teaching profession. Information about other legal questions and about approved programs in teacher certification may be obtained from the teacher certification officer, Sanchez Building 216, (512) 471-3223.

Placement Services

There is no centralized placement service at the University, but placement offices have been established in the Colleges of Business Administration, Communication, Education, Engineering, Liberal Arts, Natural Sciences, and Pharmacy; the Departments of Chemistry and Biochemistry and Geological Sciences; the School of Law; the Graduate School of Library and Information Science; and the Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs. The College of Fine Arts provides career services through the Office of the Dean; the School of Nursing, through the Student Affairs Office. In addition, a number of departments have placement advisers.

Transcripts

With proper identification, a student may purchase an official transcript in person or by mail for $5 a copy. A transcript may be ordered by telephone, provided the caller's identification can be established, for $10 a copy. The transcript includes only the academic record accumulated at the University of Texas at Austin. Unofficial copies of transcripts from other institutions are furnished by the registrar in accordance with the Texas Open Records Act, for a fee of $5. A transcript is a comprehensive record of an individual's academic progress at the University; it contains all the significant facts about a student's admission, academic level, and scholarship. No partial or incomplete record (e.g., with grades of F omitted) will be issued. A student who owes a debt to the University may not be able to obtain an official transcript until the debt is paid.

V.T.C.A., Education Code Section 4.29 provides for a fine up to $1000 and confinement in county jail for up to one year for conviction of fraudulent acquisition or attempted fraudulent acquisition or alteration or fraudulent use of a transcript or similar document.

Diplomas

A graduate of the University may purchase a diploma to replace one that has been lost or destroyed. If purchased more than one year after the original diploma was issued, the replacement will bear the reissue date below the date the degree was awarded. The signatures of University and University of Texas System officials may not be the same as those on the original diploma since the signatures of former officials are not maintained on file. Additional copies of an original diploma also may be purchased at the time of issue. Orders should be submitted to the Office of the Registrar with a $10 fee for each diploma.

A student who requests a new diploma based on a change of name must pay the fee unless the name change was submitted by the deadline set by the registrar or a postponement of the deadline was granted.

Personal Record Information

Name change. University policy is to maintain educational records under the student's full, legal name. Official documents such as diplomas and transcripts will not be issued bearing any other name.

A currently enrolled student may change the name on his or her permanent academic record by presenting a certified copy of the appropriate documentation to the registrar. To correct the spelling or the proper sequence of the name requires a copy of the student's birth certificate. To change the name, the student must present a notarized request and a copy of the signed court order showing the new legal name. To assume the spouse's name by repute following marriage, a student must present a notarized request and a copy of the marriage certificate. A student who wishes to discontinue use of the married name and resume use of the original family name, or another name, must present a divorce decree or signed court order showing restoration of the original, or other, name.

The University maintains student records under the name the student had when last enrolled. A former student may not change the name on his or her permanent academic record except by presenting a notarized request and a certified copy of the signed court order showing the authorized name change.

Change of address and/or telephone. The student must give correct local and permanent addresses and telephone numbers to the Office of the Registrar and to the office of the student's dean and must notify these offices immediately of any changes in address or telephone number. Official correspondence is sent to the address last given to the registrar; if the student has moved and failed to correct this address, he or she will not be relieved of responsibility on the grounds that the correspondence was not delivered.

Summons to Administrative Offices

A summons to the office of any administrative officer must be observed. Failure to respond to a summons may result in suspension from the University. In most colleges and schools a summons to the dean is sent by mail, so it is important that the student keep both the dean and the registrar informed of current address information.

Official Communications with the University

Students are expected to attend to business matters with the University during regular working hours, Monday through Friday. A student who is unable to conduct business personally should contact the appropriate office by mail or telephone. For purposes of proper identification and clarity, written communications should include the student's name, social security number, and local address (if applicable).

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28 August 1996. Registrar's Web Team
Comments to rgcat@utxdp.dp.utexas.edu