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General Info 04-05

Table of Contents


1. The University

2. Admission

3. Registration, Fees, and Deposits

4. Academic Policies and Procedures

5. Student Affairs

6. Libraries and Other Academic Resources

7. The Texas Exes


A. Residency Regulations

B. Official Extracurricular Student Activities

C. Institutional Rules on Student Services and Activities

D. Policy on Sex Discrimination and Sexual Harassment

E. Policy on Sexual Misconduct

F. Prohibition of Hazing

G. Policy on AIDS and HIV Infection

H. Prohibition of Sexual Assault

I. Nondiscrimination Policy

J. Prohibition of Campus Violence

K. Student Travel Policy for University-Organized or Sponsored Events

L. Student Travel Policy for Registered Student Organizations

M. Rules of Conduct for Students for Protecting the Confidentiality of Social Security Numbers

N. Use of E-mail for Official Correspondence to Students


Statistical Summaries

 

    

2. Admission

--continued

 

High School Preparation

High school students who intend to enroll at the University should take a college preparatory curriculum. Entering freshmen must have at least 15 1/2 units of high school work (grades 9-12), as described in the following table. At least 14 of these units must be in areas A through E. The number in the column "Units" is the minimum number of units the student must take in that area. One year's work in a subject is counted as one unit. A semester's work is counted as a half unit.

Students may enter the University under the provisions of Texas Education Code 51.803 without meeting the high school unit requirements, but they must remove any unit deficiencies before they graduate.

Areas Units

A. Language arts 4
  Required: Four units of English, one of which may be writing, world literature, speech, or journalism. English for speakers of other languages may not be used to fulfill the language arts requirement but may be counted as an elective in area F.

Strongly recommended: At least one unit of English should include the development of writing skills.

 

B. Foreign language 2
  Required: Two units in a single language; three units are recommended. American Sign Language may be used to fulfill the foreign language requirement.  

C. Mathematics 3
 

Required: Three units at the level of Algebra I or higher: algebra, plane geometry, trigonometry, analytic geometry, elementary analysis, probability and statistics, solid geometry, calculus with analytic geometry, number theory. Informal geometry and prealgebra are below-achievement-level courses and may not be counted toward the mathematics requirement; they may be counted as electives in area F.

Strongly recommended: Prospective students interested in studying architecture, business, natural sciences, engineering, or other technical fields are advised to prepare by taking math every year of high school. The additional unit may be counted as an elective in area F.

 

D. Science 2
  Required: Two units of physical science, biology, chemistry, physics, physiology and anatomy, geology, meteorology, marine science, astronomy.

Strongly recommended: Prospective students interested in studying architecture, business, natural sciences, engineering, or other technical fields are advised to prepare by taking science, including chemistry and physics, every year of high school. The additional unit may be counted as an elective in area F.

 

E. Social studies 3
  Required: Three units of anthropology, area studies, ethnic studies, economics, geography, government (civics), philosophy, social science, psychology, sociology, Texas history (advanced), United States history, world history, work/study programs.  

F. Electives 1 1/2
  Required: One and one-half units, including (1) any units beyond the minimum required in areas A through E; (2) any units in area G; (3) vocational and other subjects, except drill subjects (such as driver training and military training) and physical education.  

G. Fine arts  
  Strongly recommended: One-half unit of theatre arts, art, music, dance.  

Admission deficiencies. Admission is not granted to applicants who have not completed the required units listed above unless they are qualified for admission on the basis of graduation in the top 10 percent of their high school class. Students whose high school curriculum does not include the courses necessary to complete the unit requirements may apply to the director of admissions for an exception. To graduate from the University, students who are admitted by exception must remove any unit deficiencies as described in the next paragraph.

A deficiency in foreign language must be removed by earning credit for foreign language or classical language courses numbered 506 and 507 (or the equivalent) or by earning a passing score on the appropriate placement examination. A deficiency in mathematics must be removed by earning credit for Mathematics 301 (College Algebra) or 303D (Applicable Mathematics) or an equivalent transfer course. For all other subjects, one semester of college credit is required to remove a deficiency of one year or less of high school credit. Courses taken to remove a deficiency do not count toward the student's degree.

Students with Nontraditional High School Preparation

Homeschooled students. Before applying for admission, homeschooled students should contact the Office of Admissions for instructions on what will be needed for an admission decision. Information about a student's educational progress and academic abilities is essential to an informed decision. Admission to the University is competitive, and a number of factors are considered, including the student's rank in his or her high school class. Since class rank is unavailable for homeschooled students, the Office of Admissions looks at other indicators of academic competitiveness. Some indicators are SAT I and SAT II scores; the curriculum used in the homeschool environment; awards and honors the student won in competition with traditionally schooled students; state, regional, or national academic recognition; Advanced Placement Examination scores; grades the student earned in college courses taken in conjunction with homeschooling; and other indicators that might be available to the student. In a competitive admission environment, it is to homeschooled students' advantage to submit as much information as possible, to help the Office of Admissions place them properly within the applicant pool.

Graduates of unaccredited schools. Graduates of unaccredited high schools may seek admission. Admission to the University is competitive, and a number of factors are considered. In addition to all application material, the graduate of an unaccredited school should provide as much supporting information as possible. Some important indicators of the student's academic competitiveness are SAT I and SAT II scores, Advanced Placement courses, grades in college-level courses the student took while in high school, and an academic profile of the school.

Students who did not graduate from high school. Texas residents who did not graduate from high school and are at least twenty-one years old may seek admission through special consideration. In addition to all application material, the student must provide a copy of GED results. It is important for the student to provide as much information as possible in support of the application. Some important indicators of the student's academic competitiveness are SAT I and SAT II scores, Advanced Placement courses, and grades in college-level courses the student took while in high school.

 


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General Information
Table of Contents
Chapter 1 - The University
Chapter 2 - Admission
Chapter 3 - Registration, Fees, and Deposits
Chapter 4 - Academic Policies and Procedures
Chapter 5 - Student Affairs
Chapter 6 - Libraries and Other Academic Resources
Chapter 7 - The Texas Exes
Appendix A - Residency Regulations
Appendix B - Official Extracurricular Student Activities
Appendix C - Institutional Rules on Student Services and Activities
Appendix D - Policy on Sex Discrimination and Sexual Harassment
Appendix E - Policy on Sexual Misconduct
Appendix F - Prohibition of Hazing
Appendix G - Policy on AIDS and HIV Infection
Appendix H - Prohibition of Sexual Assault
Appendix I - Nondiscrimination Policy
Appendix J - Prohibition of Campus Violence
Appendix K - Student Travel Policy for University-Organized or Sponsored Events
Appendix L - Student Travel Policy for Registered Student Organizations
Appendix M - Rules of Conduct for Students for Protecting the Confidentiality of Social Security Numbers
Appendix N - Use of E-mail for Official Correspondence to Students
Statistical Summaries

Related Information
Catalogs
Course Schedules
Academic Calendars
Office of Admissions


Office of the Registrar
University of Texas at Austin

17 August 2004. Office of the Registrar

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