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Grad Catalog 01-03

CONTENTS

CHAPTER 1
Graduate Study

CHAPTER 2
Admission and
Registration

CHAPTER 3
Degree
Requirements

CHAPTER 4
Fields
of Study

CHAPTER 5
Members of
Graduate Studies
Committees

APPENDIX
Course
Abbreviations

 

    

Special Education

--continued

 

Graduate Courses

The faculty has approval to offer the following courses in the academic years 2001-2002 and 2002-2003; however, not all courses are taught each semester or summer session. Students should consult the Course Schedule to determine which courses and topics will be offered during a particular semester or summer session. The Course Schedule may also reflect changes made to the course inventory after the publication of this catalog.

Unless otherwise stated below, each course meets for three lecture hours a week for one semester.

Special Education: SED

380. Contemporary Issues in Multicultural Special Education.
Study of critical issues in culture, language, and disability. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Special Education 380 and 393 may not both be counted unless the topics vary; Special Education 380 and 395 may not both be counted unless the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing; twelve semester hours of upper-division coursework in education, psychology, sociology, or other behavioral sciences; and consent of instructor.

Topic 1: Language Acquisition and Assessment in Multicultural Special Education.
Language acquisition among culturally and linguistically diverse learners in general and special education, with emphasis on effective assessment and instruction.

Topic 2: Multicultural Factors in Parent/Family Involvement.
Designed to prepare students to work with parents and families from culturally diverse backgrounds; to understand the need for parent/family participation in the education of children; and to understand the transition problems faced by parents, families, and children as students move through the education system.

Topic 3: Minorities and Mental Retardation.
Study of the culturally and linguistically different student.

Topic 4: Assessment in Bilingual Special Education.
Cultural and linguistic factors related to the assessment of language-minority students; the best practice in psychoeducational procedures.

Topic 5: Seminar in Bilingual Special Education.
Bilingual special education, including issues related to law, policy, research, and practice.

Topic 6: Research Topics in Multicultural Special Education.
Current and emerging research on individuals with disabilities who are from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds. Provides students with opportunities to review research literature on topics of interest to them, and to explore their writing skills. A process approach to writing is used to familiarize students with the APA guidelines for preparing scholarly manuscripts.

Topic 7: Cross-Cultural Interactions in Multicultural Special Education.
Introduction to principles of intercultural communication for educators. Emphasis on strategies for effective cross-cultural communication in a variety of educational settings, including general and special education.

Topic 8: School-Community Relations in Multicultural Special Education.

Topic 9: Developing Personnel Preparation Programs in Multicultural Special Education.
Designed to prepare students who plan to become faculty members at multifaceted institutions of higher education. Specific emphasis on issues that confront minority educators.

380K. The Visually Disabled.
Adaptations and applications of Braille and other tactual materials; psychological and sociological factors affecting learning and behavior. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing; twelve semester hours of upper-division education, psychology, or other behavioral sciences, including a course in special education; and consent of instructor.

Topic 2: Psychological and Social Aspects of Visual Impairment.
Attitudes and approaches to visual impairment. The adjustment process, parent and family concerns, agency and social values, and expectations.

Topic 3: Research in Visual Disabilities.

Topic 5: Educational Implications of Vision Problems of Exceptional Children.
Anatomy and physiology of the eye; pathological conditions; screening, visual development, assessment, the use of low-vision aids, and vision use.

Topic 7: Instructional Methods in Education of the Student with a Visual Disability and Multiple Disabilities.
Special learning needs of children who have other disabilities in addition to a visual impairment, including those who are deaf-blind. Overview of the impact of additional disabilities and of those instructional methods that emphasize development of integrated learning routines that address the use of vision.

Topic 10: Motor and Sensory Development of the Visually Disabled and Multiply Disabled.
Normal and atypical development in motor and sensory systems, and their relationships to spatial orientation, movement, and efficient travel. Emphasizes the impact of vision but also includes sensory and motoric stimulation, sensory integration, and sensory and motoric efficiency training as it relates to travel concepts and abilities.

Topic 11: Curriculum and Assessment in Orientation and Mobility.
Methods for individualizing the teaching of orientation and mobility skills; practice in analyzing and selecting appropriate instructional environments and methods within various service delivery models. Adaptation and development of materials relevant to orientation and mobility evaluation and instruction, with program planning and evaluation development.

383. Contemporary Issues: Learning Disabilities.
Nature and concomitant results of minimal brain damage as it affects the characteristics and learning behavior of children; assessment and appraisal instruments; activities and materials for stimulation of learning. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing; twelve semester hours of upper-division education, psychology, or other behavioral sciences, including a course in special education; and consent of instructor.

Topic 1: Introduction to Learning Disabilities.
Basic terms and definitions, the nature of specific learning disorders, theoretical models, and empirical classification systems.

Topic 2: Clinical Procedures in Learning Disabilities.
Supervised field practice in diagnosis and/or treatment of specific learning disorders. Additional prerequisite: Special Education 383 (Topic 1).

Topic 3: Assessment of Learning Disabilities.
The rationale for and the administration of procedures for the modification of learning behavior on an individualized or prescriptive basis. Additional prerequisite: Special Education 383 (Topic 1).

Topic 4: Research Internship in Learning Disabilities.
A laboratory and field course designed to test new instructional approaches to education by working directly with children in classroom or remedial settings.

Topic 5: Experimental Approaches to Learning Disabilities.
Investigation, critique, and creativity of learning systems in students with multiple developmental disabilities; methodologies analyzed in accordance with learning characteristics and theories.

Topic 6: Teaching the Dyslexic and Remedial Reader.
Theories and practices associated with dyslexia; terminology, assessment, and remedial strategies are emphasized.

a name="sed384">384. Contemporary Issues: Early Childhood Education for the Disabled.
Education variables related to educational services and research for young children are investigated in terms of etiology, assessment, curriculum models, educational settings, and interdisciplinary programming. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing; twelve semester hours of upper-division education, psychology, or other behavioral sciences, including a course in special education; and consent of instructor.

Topic 1: Overview of Early Childhood Special Education.
The educational and emotional needs of young disabled children (birth to six) and the techniques for implementing a "whole child" educational approach to meet the needs of the child and the family.

Topic 2: Current Research in Early Childhood Special Education.
Latest ECSED research and theory as related to past, present, and anticipated trends. Emphasis is on writing a program, research proposal, or publishable article. May be repeated for credit.

Topic 3: Parent Education Models.
The grief stages of parents; parent involvement models available to promote optimum parent-child and parent-professional relationships.

Topic 4: Introductory Practicum.
Teaching experience with disabled children in a center setting. Assessment and curriculum procedures are applied in developing an appropriate education for an individual child or small groups of children.

Topic 5: Advanced Practicum.
Teaching experience with a large group of children in a center setting. Program management and evaluation procedures are applied to a total curriculum so that the student assumes a lead teacher and/or consultant role during training.

Topic 6: Assessment and Programming of Early Childhood Special Education.
Experience in assessing a disabled child in a naturalistic setting. Formal and informal assessment procedures for children from birth through age six.

Topic 7: Medical/Educational Overview: Birth to Age Three Special Education.
Overview of hospital-to-school early intervention techniques for meeting the medical and educational needs of preterm, low-birth-weight, and at-risk children and their parents.

Topic 8: Medical/Educational Parent Education and Involvement: Birth to Age Three Special Education.
Research, design, and implementation of a functional child-parent program. Students develop their own programs for working with parents of children with specific problems or disabilities.

Topic 9: Medical/Educational Assessment: Birth to Age Three Special Education.
Experience planning, assessing, and implementing educational programs for at-risk infants and toddlers. Emphasis is on interagency coordination and the use of the transdisciplinary team to meet the family's and the child's needs with a minimum of personnel.

Topic 10: Medical/Educational Programming for Birth to Age Three Special Education.
Medical information on pre-, peri-, and postnatal effects of medical problems and extended hospital stays. Impact of medical intervention on the infant's and the family's development.

Topic 11: Medical/Educational Practicum.
Early intervention in a neonatal intensive care unit or on a follow-up team for medically fragile high-risk children.

386. Contemporary Issues: The Emotionally Disturbed.
Discussion of behavioral disorders, contributory factors; psychological and educational diagnoses applied to educational programming. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing; twelve semester hours of upper-division education, psychology, or other behavioral sciences, including a course in special education; and consent of instructor.

Topic 1: Seminar: Behavioral Disorders.

Topic 2: Behavioral Disorders and Juvenile Delinquency.
Lectures, audiovisual materials, class activities, and field trips provide information on problems in teaching the behaviorally disordered and juvenile delinquent. The student also designs and conducts an independent study.

Topic 3: Educational Problems of Emotional Disturbance and Autism.
Characteristics, etiology, and treatment of autism, a severely incapacitating, lifelong disorder that develops early in childhood; implications for instructional practices.

Topic 4: Crisis Management.
Techniques for preventing crises and for managing those that do occur. Lectures, videotape presentations, and active practice help students develop plans for managing crises, predicting crisis behavior, managing disruptive, out-of-control, and aggressive students, and counseling students after a crisis.

Topic 5: Counseling Approaches with the Emotionally Disturbed.

Topic 6: Psycho-Educational Procedures.
A methods course for those preparing to teach students who are emotionally disturbed, behaviorally disordered, or autistic. Emphasis is on topics relevant to the educational process, including assessment/evaluation, behavior management, classroom organization, instructional techniques, and curricula. Active participation in and outside of class is expected.

Topic 7: Parent Involvement.

Topic 8: Practicum: The Mildly Disturbed.
Supervised, field-based observation and experience with the mildly disturbed.

Topic 9: Advanced Practicum: The Severely Disturbed.
Supervised, field-based observation and experience with the severely disturbed.

Topic 10: Introduction to Behavior Disorders.
Introduction to the nature and needs of children with behavior disorders and to effective management methods and teaching strategies. The admission, review, and dismissal process is described and practiced so that students can work as members of an interdisciplinary team.

387. Rehabilitation Counseling.
Study of rehabilitation counseling: basic orientation, process and procedures; related biomedical, psychological, and community aspects; specialized programs and field experiences. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing; twelve semester hours of upper-division education, psychology, sociology, or other behavioral sciences; and consent of instructor.

Topic 1: Introduction to Rehabilitation Counseling.
Orientation to rehabilitation; historical developments, philosophy, disability, legal basis, organizational structure, facilities, and related professions. Field visitations.

Topic 2: Adjustment to Disabling Conditions and Illness.
Psychodynamic principles of adjustment to disability, individual perception of illness, and motivation for recovery; including somatopsychological and psychosomatic aspects.

Topic 3: Medical/Paramedical Aspects of Rehabilitation Counseling.
Contributions of the medical profession; terminology, etiology, prognosis, therapeutic services, restorative techniques, assessment of limitations and capacities in typical disabilities.

Topic 4: Rehabilitation Counseling Process and Procedures.
Systematic study of the rehabilitation counseling process, including required basic counselor skills, techniques, services, community resources, and professional ethics.

Topic 5: Prepracticum.
Supervised, field-based observation and experience in rehabilitation counseling.

Topic 6: Practicum in Rehabilitation Counseling.
Individually supervised and systematically organized participation in rehabilitation counseling, case management, and professional skill development. Additional prerequisite: Consent of Instructor.

Topic 7: Specialized Problems in Rehabilitation Counseling.
Intensive study of specialized problems related to specific disability groups, counseling methods, and concepts in vocational placement.

Topic 8: Supervised Clinical Practice in Rehabilitation Counseling.
Supervised clinical experience in rehabilitation settings; integration of theory and practice through supervision of experience, seminars, and individual conferences.

Topic 9: Rehabilitation Counseling Theories.
Current rehabilitation counseling theories with specific applications in rehabilitation settings. Current issues in rehabilitation counseling, case management, planning, and service delivery for specific disability groups.

Topic 11: Rehabilitation Counseling and Placement.
The application of career development and job placement concepts to people with disabilities. Occupational choice, vocational counseling, occupational aspects of disability, pertinent laws and regulations.

Topic 14: Group Counseling in Rehabilitation Counseling.
Basic issues and key concepts of the group process. Analysis of the therapeutic process, stages of development, and practices. Special Education 387 (Topic 14) and 393 (Topic: Group Counseling in Rehabilitation Counseling) may not both be counted.

Topic 15: Case Management in Rehabilitation Counseling.
Management aspects of the rehabilitation counselor's job, including writing job descriptions; applying the selection and appraisal processes; applying civil rights laws that affect services to disabled persons; using the five functions of management; and working in a re-engineered environment. Special Education 387 (Topic 15) and 393 (Topic: Case Management in Rehabilitation Counseling) may not both be counted.

388. Contemporary Issues: Multiple Developmental Disabilities.
An intensive study of the psychological, sociological, physiological, and educational factors relating to the assessment, learning styles, and teaching of children with multiple developmental disabilities. Includes affective, cognitive, and psychomotor development of the physically disabled and those with multiple developmental disabilities. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing; twelve semester hours of upper-division education, psychology, or other behavioral sciences, including a course in special education; and consent of instructor.

Topic 1: Learning Theory and Multiple Developmental Disabilities.
Translation of major learning theories into instructional practice with various populations of children with multiple disabilities. Analysis of current practices in relation to learning styles.

Topic 2: Diagnosis and Assessment of Multiple Developmental Disabilities.
Analysis of the development of formal and informal assessment procedures used with children and youth with multiple developmental disabilities. Instrumentation administration and interpretation of results in relation to instructional techniques. Field experience is included.

Topic 3: Education Procedures for Severe Multiple Developmental Disabilities.
Survey of community services, including educational services, for people of all ages with severe/profound disabilities; special instructional methodologies. Topics include behavior management techniques; communication skill development; stimulation of gross and fine motor development; body positioning for functional use; instructional programming; vocational training; assessment; and medical information about people with severe/profound multiple developmental disabilities, including mental retardation.

Topic 4: Advanced Studies: Severe/Profound Multiple Developmental Disabilities.
Critical review of current literature on community inclusion of people with severe/profound disabilities, covering regular education inclusion, community living inclusion, and employment inclusion. Evaluation of the personal and environmental elements necessary for successful inclusion into the community. Students design studies related to the central topic.

389. Special Education Administration.
Study of the content and process of special education administration, including technological forecasting methods, case law as it applies to people with disabilities, management of problem employee styles, and related topics. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing; twelve semester hours of upper-division education, psychology, or other behavioral sciences, including a course in special education; and consent of instructor.

Topic 1: Administration of Special Education Programs.
Application of principles of administration and leadership to problems associated with special education and instruction for special populations.

Topic 2: Educational Futures.
Students are directed toward career goals: affective change toward the future and change processes; acquisition of knowledge about several technological forecasting methods and of skill in the use of one method.

Topic 3: Special Education Administration Seminar: Current Issues in Special Education.

Topic 4: Law and Disabilities.
An examination of case law that covers definitions, equal educational opportunity, employment, accessibility, freedom of choice, freedom from residential confinement, housing and zoning restrictions, equal access to medical services, procreation, marriage, children, contracts, ownership and transfer of property, voting, and holding public office.

Topic 5: Special Populations.
Leadership issues associated with serving school-age children through federal and state "title" programs, including English as a second language, bilingual education, and Chapters I and II. Also covered are alternative schools; programs for juvenile offenders, pregnant students and young mothers, and at-risk students such as those who have potential for suicide; and services for the homeless, the abused, and chemical abusers. Students read the significant literature and develop knowledge and skill in planning and designing delivery models.

393. Graduate Seminar in Special Education.
Discussion of critical issues; critiques of literature; development of theories and models regarding disabling conditions. The equivalent of three class hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Special Education 380 and 393 may not both be counted unless the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing; twelve semester hours of upper-division education, psychology, or other behavioral sciences; and consent of instructor.

Topic 1: Developmental Disabilities and Differences.

Topic 2: Diagnostic and Instructional Assessment.

Topic 4: Behavior Management.

Topic 5: Applied Research in Special Education and Rehabilitation Counseling.

Topic 6: General Special Education.

Topic 7: Bilingual Special Education.

Topic 9: Doctoral Professional Seminar I.

Topic 10: Doctoral Professional Seminar II.

Topic 11: Language Acquisition and Assessment of Exceptional Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Students.

Topic 12: Cultural and Linguistic Diversity in Special Education and Rehabilitation Counselor Education.
An overview of issues, problems, and emerging practices related to culturally and linguistically diverse students served in special education.

Topic 13: Issues in Special Populations.
Addresses the issue of providing an equal opportunity to learn, focusing on the needs of students in special populations, and the programs that serve such students in schools.

Topic 14: Assessment in Special Education and Rehabilitation Counseling.
The basic concepts related to the assessment of exceptional individuals.

Topic 15: Instructional Adaptations I.
Design, implementation, and evaluation of instruction for elementary- and secondary-level students with mild to moderate disabilities who receive special education services.

Topic 16: Instructional Adaptations II.
Issues in the education of instruction of students with mild to moderate disabilities, including assessing students, evaluating instruction and instructional materials, and adapting and implementing instruction.

Topic 17: Instructional Designs Using Assistive Technology.
The design of instruction for students with disabilities by using assistive and instructional technologies.

Topic 18: Collaboration.
Strategies such as collaborative consultation and teamwork models, which are used to improve learning outcomes for students with diverse learning needs.

394, 694. Practicum in Special Education.
Supervised field placement in specialized settings serving exceptional children and youth. Conference course. With consent of the graduate adviser, may be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, acceptance by internship committee, and consent of instructor.

395. Research in Special Education.
Individual research planned, executed, and reported under supervision. Conference course. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Special Education 380 and 395 may not both be counted unless the topics vary. Prerequisite: Admission to an approved program of graduate study or candidacy for the doctoral degree in education, and consent of instructor.

Topic 1: Individual Instruction in Administration of Special Education.

Topic 2: Individual Instruction in Emotional Disturbance.

Topic 3: Mental Retardation.

Topic 4: Individual Instruction in Learning Disabilities.

Topic 5: Individual Instruction in Visual Disabilities.

Topic 6: Individual Instruction in Rehabilitation Counseling.

Topic 7: Individual Instruction in Early Childhood Special Education.

Topic 8: Individual Instruction in Developmental Disabilities.

Topic 9: Research Methodology in Special Education.

Topic 10: Computer Data Analysis in Special Education.

Topic 11: Individual Instruction in General Special Education.

Topic 13: Individual Instruction in Bilingual Special Education.

Topic 15: Individual Instruction in Multicultural Special Education.

695S. Professional Seminar.
Review of the literature and foundations of special education. Three lecture hours a week for two semesters. Required of all doctoral students. Prerequisite: For 695SA, graduate standing and admission to the doctoral program in special education; for 695SB, Special Education 695SA.

396C. Trends and Issues.
An examination of current trends and issues in areas within special education and rehabilitation counselor education. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Special Education 396C and 396T may not both be counted unless the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing; twelve semester hours of upper-division coursework in education, psychology, sociology, or other behavioral sciences; and consent of instructor.

Topic 1: Trends and Issues in Early Childhood Special Education.
Current trends and issues in early childhood special education that influence policies and procedures in the public schools, teacher preparation programs, and community agencies.

Topic 2: Trends and Issues in General Special Education.
Current trends and issues in general special education that influence policies and procedures in the public schools, teacher preparation programs, and community agencies.

Topic 3: Trends and Issues in Multicultural Special Education.
Current trends and issues in multicultural special education that influence polices and procedures in public schools, teacher preparation programs, and community agencies.

Topic 4: Trends and Issues in Rehabilitation Counselor Education.
Current trends and issues in rehabilitation counselor education that influence polices and procedures in public schools, teacher preparation programs, and community agencies.

Topic 5: Trends and Issues in Special Education Administration.
Current trends and issues in special education administration that influence polices and procedures in public schools, teacher preparation programs, and community agencies.

Topic 6: Classic Writings in Special Education and Rehabilitation Counseling.
The history of special education through the examination of classic writings in special education and rehabilitation counseling

396M. Research Mentoring.
Development of a publishable-quality document under the supervision of the student's adviser and two other faculty members selected by the graduate adviser. Conference course. Special Education 396M and 396T (Topic: Research Mentoring) may not both be counted. Required of all doctoral students. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, at least three graduate courses in statistics, and consent of the graduate adviser.

396P. Prospectus.
Development of a proposed research study. Students write and integrate a literature review. The equivalent of three lecture hours a week for one semester. Required of all doctoral students prior to admission to candidacy. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and Special Education 396M.

396T. Directed Research in Special Education.
May be repeated for credit by doctoral students when the topics vary. Special Education 396C and 396T may not both be counted unless the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, twelve semester hours of upper-division education, and consent of instructor.

Topic 1: Administration of Special Education.

Topic 2: Emotional Disturbance.

Topic 3: Mental Retardation.

Topic 4: Learning Disabilities.

Topic 5: Visual Disabilities.

Topic 6: Rehabilitation Counseling.

Topic 7: Early Childhood Special Education.

Topic 8: Developmental Disabilities.

Topic 9: General Special Education.

Topic 13: Multicultural Special Education.

397P, 697P. Graduate Internship.
Supervised practice in a professional position. The equivalent of three or six lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, twelve semester hours of upper-division coursework in education, and admission by internship committee of the designated program area.

Topic 1: Administration of Special Education.

Topic 6: Rehabilitation Counseling.

Topic 7: Early Childhood Special Education.

Topic 9: General Special Education.

Topic 13: Multicultural Special Education.

397S. Supervised Teaching in Special Education.
Instruction in the supervision of student teachers and observers at the undergraduate level. Conference course. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, appointment as a teaching assistant and supervisor of undergraduate student teachers, and consent of instructor.

698. Thesis.
The equivalent of three lecture hours a week for two semesters. Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Prerequisite: For 698A, graduate standing in special education and consent of the supervising professor and the graduate adviser; for 698B, Special Education 698A.

398R. Master's Report.
Preparation of a report to fulfill the requirement for the master's degree under the report option. The equivalent of three lecture hours a week for one semester. Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in special education and consent of the graduate adviser.

398T. College Teaching in Special Education.
Seminar on adult learning for doctoral students; design, delivery, and evaluation of college courses; the use of technology in college teaching; proposal writing; and personnel preparation in special education. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and appointment as a teaching assistant.

399R, 699R, 999R. Dissertation.
Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Prerequisite: Admission to candidacy for the doctoral degree.

399W, 699W, 999W. Dissertation.
Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Prerequisite: Special Education 399R, 699R, or 999R.


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About the Program: Special Education

      

 

Graduate Catalog
Contents
Chapter 1 - Graduate Study
Chapter 2 - Admission and Registration
Chapter 3 - Degree Requirements
Chapter 4 - Fields of Study
Chapter 5 - Members of Graduate Studies Committees
Appendix - Course Abbreviations

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Office of the Registrar
University of Texas at Austin

26 July 2001. Registrar's Web Team

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