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Grad Catalog 01-03

CONTENTS

CHAPTER 1
Graduate Study

CHAPTER 2
Admission and
Registration

CHAPTER 3
Degree
Requirements

CHAPTER 4
Fields
of Study

CHAPTER 5
Members of
Graduate Studies
Committees

APPENDIX
Course
Abbreviations

 

    

Economics

Degrees Offered
Master of Arts
Master of Science in Economics
Doctor of Philosophy

Facilities for Graduate Work

In addition to the department resources described below, graduate students in economics may use the research facilities of the Teresa Lozano Long Institute of Latin American Studies, the Bureau of Business Research, the Population Research Center, and the Lyndon Baines Johnson Library and Museum, as well as those of the General Libraries and Academic Computing. Also available in Austin are state government offices; regional offices of federal agencies, including the Internal Revenue Service; and the offices of several research institutions.

Computer facilities. In addition to a SPARCsystem 600 server and several SPARC workstations, the department has a computer laboratory equipped with twenty-five SPARCclassic X terminals and four multiprocessor servers running Solaris 2.5. These provide access to the X Window System, which allows users to run simultaneous applications on different hosts. Software available through each terminal and by remote access includes high-level programming languages, compilers, and debuggers for program development. Also installed are IMSL, LSSOL, and NPSOL libraries, several statistical and spreadsheet programs, and applications for symbolic mathematical manipulations, plotting, and word processing.

Center for Applied Research in Economics. The center maintains a local area network of Pentium Pro-based computers for empirical research by graduate students and faculty members. GAUSS, STATA, Mathematica, and word-processing and spreadsheet applications are installed, and the machines are available for student use at all times.

Areas of Study

The Department of Economics offers graduate study and research in the core areas of microeconomics, macroeconomics, and econometrics and in a broad selection of applied areas. Current area offerings are listed in the department's graduate program brochure, available on request.

Graduate Studies Committee

The following faculty members served on the Graduate Studies Committee in the spring semester 2000-2001.

Stephen G. Bronars
David A. Chapman
Harry Cleaver
Douglas C. Dacy
Peter Debaere
Stephen Donald
Richard Dusansky
Scott J. Freeman
Don Fullerton
Li Gan
Vincent J. Geraci
William P. Glade
Daniel S. Hamermesh
Niles M. Hansen
Melvin J. Hinich
Wolfgang Keller
David A. Kendrick
George Kozmetsky
     Subal C. Kumbhakar
Stephen P. Magee
R. Preston McAfee
Alexandra L. Minicozzi
Alfred L. Norman
Gerald S. Oettinger
Carol Shiue
David S. Sibley
Daniel T. Slesnick
Bruce Smith
Dale O. Stahl
Maxwell B. Stinchcombe
Stephen J. Trejo
Andrew B. Whinston
Peter J. Wilcoxen
Roberton C. Williams III
Paul W. Wilson

Admission Requirements

Applicants should have completed at least twelve semester hours of upper-division coursework in economics, including three hours each in intermediate-level microeconomic and macroeconomic theory. The applicant should also have a firm grounding in differential and integral calculus, with an emphasis on proofs; matrix algebra; and probability theory. Exposure to advanced calculus, analysis, and topology is also desirable. A student may be admitted without meeting these requirements if he or she has other exceptionally strong qualifications; the student must then remedy deficiencies in undergraduate preparation, without graduate credit, during the first year in the program.

Degree Requirements

Master of Arts

The Master of Arts degree program requires completion of thirty semester hours of coursework, including Economics 387L (Topic 1: Microeconomics I), 387L (Topic 2: Macroeconomics I), and 698. At least eighteen semester hours, including the thesis, must be in the major area, and at least six hours must be in supporting work. The program may include no more than nine hours of upper-division undergraduate work, no more than six hours of which may be in either the major or the supporting work. The student must take at least twenty-one semester hours in economics and either six or nine hours of approved coursework outside economics. He or she must earn separate grade point averages in economics and in the supporting work of at least 3.00.

Master of Science in Economics

This degree program requires completion of at least thirty-six semester hours of coursework, including Economics 387L (Topic 1: Microeconomics I), 387L (Topic 2: Macroeconomics I), and 392M (Topic 2: Econometrics I). At least eighteen semester hours must be in the major area, and at least six hours must be in supporting work. The program may include no more than nine hours of upper-division undergraduate work, no more than six hours of which may be in either the major or the supporting work. In addition to the required courses listed above, the student must complete two courses in one of the areas of study offered by the department; he or she must also take either two courses in a second area or Economics 392M (Topic 3: Econometrics II). No more than six hours of work may be taken on the credit/no credit basis; neither the required courses nor the courses in the two areas may be taken on this basis. The student must earn separate grade point averages in economics and in the supporting work of at least 3.00.

Doctor of Philosophy

The doctoral degree is based on satisfactory performance in courses and comprehensive examinations and on the completion of a dissertation. The student seeking admission to candidacy for the doctoral degree must take eight core courses: Economics 387L (Topic 1: Microeconomics I), 387L (Topic 3: Microeconomics II), 387L (Topic 2: Macroeconomics I), 387L (Topic 4: Macroeconomics II), 392M (Topic 1: Probability and Statistics), 392M (Topic 2: Econometrics I), 392M (Topic 3: Econometrics II), and an alternative perspectives course chosen from courses in economic history and political economy. Doctoral students must pass comprehensive examinations in microeconomics and macroeconomics.

The student's program must include at least twenty-four semester hours of approved work taken in residence. In addition to the core courses, each student must complete two graduate courses in each of two elective fields of specialization. Upon completion of each pair of field courses, the student must demonstrate professional competence in the field. The method by which competence is assessed varies by field but is generally either a comprehensive examination, an acceptable research paper, or both. The student is also required to complete two elective graduate courses in economics or other approved areas. Presentation of a substantial research paper in a departmental seminar, registration in three additional research seminars, the dissertation, and the final oral defense complete the doctoral degree program in economics.

For More Information

Campus address: Bernard and Audre Rapoport Building (BRB) 1.116, phone (512) 471-3211, fax (512) 471-3510; campus mail code: C3100

Mailing address: Graduate Program, Department of Economics, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712-1173

Gopher: Gopher to gopher.utexas.edu. Select UTAustin/Colleges and Departments/Economics Department

URL: http://www.eco.utexas.edu/


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Economics Courses: ECO

      

 

Graduate Catalog
Contents
Chapter 1 - Graduate Study
Chapter 2 - Admission and Registration
Chapter 3 - Degree Requirements
Chapter 4 - Fields of Study
Chapter 5 - Members of Graduate Studies Committees
Appendix - Course Abbreviations

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Office of the Registrar
University of Texas at Austin

26 July 2001. Registrar's Web Team

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