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Grad Catalog 01-03

CONTENTS

CHAPTER 1
Graduate Study

CHAPTER 2
Admission and
Registration

CHAPTER 3
Degree
Requirements

CHAPTER 4
Fields
of Study

CHAPTER 5
Members of
Graduate Studies
Committees

APPENDIX
Course
Abbreviations

 

    

Middle Eastern Languages and Cultures

Degrees Offered
Master of Arts (in Arabic Studies, Hebrew Studies, or Persian Studies)
Doctor of Philosophy (in Arabic Studies, Hebrew Studies, or Persian Studies)

Facilities for Graduate Work

The University libraries have extensive holdings on Middle Eastern languages and cultures. The Perry-CastaŅeda Library contains about 145,000 books and 1,230 journal titles in Arabic, Hebrew, Persian, Turkish, and Azerbaijani. More information about General Libraries resources is given in the description of the program in Middle Eastern studies.

Areas of Study

Students in the Middle Eastern languages and cultures program concentrate in Arabic, Hebrew, or Persian. The master's degree is offered in language, linguistics, literature, pedagogy, and Islamic studies, and in cultural studies in the student's area of concentration. The doctoral degree is offered in Arabic language, linguistics, and literature and in Islamic studies; in Hebrew language, linguistics, and literature (biblical, rabbinic, and modern), biblical history and archaeology, Jewish thought, and the culture of ancient and modern Israel; and in Persian language and Persian literature.

With the approval of the graduate adviser and the graduate dean, students may design special programs that include courses from outside the department that are related to the major area of study.

Graduate courses are offered in Arabic, Hebrew, Persian, and Turkish languages and literatures and in the cultures of the Middle East. The study of these languages, literatures, and cultures may also be included in programs leading to master's or doctoral degrees in other departments. Students who are interested in an interdisciplinary professional degree with a regional concentration on the Middle East should consider the program in Middle Eastern studies.

Graduate Studies Committee

The following faculty members served on the Graduate Studies Committee in the spring semester 2000-2001.

Peter F. Abboud
Kamran S. Aghaie
Aaron Bar-Adon
Yildiray Erdener
Mohammad Ghanoonparvar
Zilla J. Goodman
Michael C. Hillmann
     Akel I. Kahera
Harold Alter Liebowitz
Mohammad A. Mohammad
Esther L. Raizen
Faegheh Shirazi
Avraham Zilkha

Degree Requirements

Master of Arts

Arabic studies. This program offers graduate training in Arabic language (modern Fusha and the classical language), linguistics, literature, and pedagogy and in Islamic studies; provides training in linguistic analysis, literary and cultural history, literary criticism, and teaching methodology; and introduces research methods leading to independent investigation. Participation in the program assumes a Bachelor of Arts in Arabic language and literature, or the equivalent. It requires a level of competence in modern Fusha Arabic that enables students to participate fully in courses conducted exclusively in Arabic: that is, proficiency of advanced or better in at least three of the four skills on a nationally recognized scale. Courses taken to make up undergraduate deficiencies may not be counted toward the degree.

The Master of Arts with thesis requires thirty semester hours of coursework: eighteen hours of linguistics, literature, pedagogy, and Islamic studies; six hours of electives chosen in consultation with a faculty adviser and the Arabic faculty; and six hours in the thesis course. No more than nine hours may be in upper-division courses. The thesis is normally written in English; under certain circumstances and with written consent of the graduate dean, it may be written in Arabic.

The Master of Arts with report requires thirty-three semester hours of coursework: twenty-one hours of linguistics, literature, pedagogy, and Islamic studies; nine hours of electives chosen in consultation with a faculty adviser and the Arabic faculty; and three hours in the report course. No more than nine hours may be in upper-division courses. With special permission, the report may be written in Arabic.

Hebrew studies. This program offers graduate training in Hebrew language, linguistics, and literature (biblical, rabbinic, modern); Jewish thought; the culture of ancient and modern Israel; and biblical archaeology. The program trains students in research methods leading to independent investigation. Entering students should have a Bachelor of Arts in Hebrew language and literature, or the equivalent. Those who do not must take Hebrew 321, Hebrew Grammar, Hebrew 322, Introduction to Hebrew Literature, and Hebrew 325, Advanced Conversation and Composition, before taking graduate Hebrew courses. These courses may not be counted toward the degree. To acquire a master's degree, students are expected to demonstrate a level of competence in Modern Hebrew of intermediate high or better on a nationally accepted proficiency scale. For students specializing in ancient Hebrew culture or biblical archaeology, the language requirement is determined by the Hebrew faculty and the graduate adviser. At least thirty semester hours of coursework are required, including a six-semester-hour thesis course. The thesis is normally written in English; under certain circumstances and with written consent of the graduate dean, it may be written in Hebrew.

Persian studies. This program offers graduate training in Persian language and literature. Participation assumes practical mastery of the modern Persian language. The program provides exposure to major literary texts and genres and introduces research methods leading to independent work. One year of Arabic is required. Credit for that coursework and for any coursework in Persian that the student needs to develop reading competence may not be counted toward the degree.

The Master of Arts with thesis requires thirty semester hours of coursework: Persian 384C (Topic 1: Ferdowsi's Shahanameh), 384C (Topic 2: Sa'di's Golestan), 384C (Topic 3: Hafez and Classical Persian Lyric Poetry), 388, a survey course in twentieth-century Persian literature, a course in literary criticism, an elective in Persian literature, and the six-semester-hour thesis course. The requirements for the Master of Arts with report are the same, except that a relevant course with Iranian or Islamic studies content and the three-semester-hour report course replace the thesis course.

Doctor of Philosophy

Participation in the doctoral degree program requires a master's degree or the equivalent in the relevant area and language. The program is designed to increase the breadth and depth of the student's knowledge and to develop his or her capacity for independent scholarly research. The courses required are determined by the student's interests. For research purposes, reading knowledge in one or two languages is required in addition to the student's language of concentration; another Middle Eastern language of relevance to the student's research is expected. A period of study and research is recommended in a country where the language of concentration is used. To be admitted to candidacy for the degree, the student must pass a qualifying examination at a time approved by the graduate adviser.

An examination committee oversees the student's progress and eventually administers a comprehensive examination. After passing this examination, the candidate sets up a dissertation committee with the help of the graduate adviser. This committee approves the dissertation proposal, guides the student in writing the dissertation, and administers the final oral defense. The dissertation is normally written in English; under certain circumstances and with the written consent of the graduate dean, it may be written in the language of concentration.

Arabic studies and Hebrew studies. Students choose between a specialization in literature and culture with supporting work in language and linguistics and a specialization in language and linguistics with supporting work in literature and culture. They normally take relevant courses in such fields as Islamic studies or Jewish studies, language pedagogy, and history and anthropology of the Middle East.

Students who specialize in literature must take two courses in literary criticism; the culture track does not require these courses. Students who specialize in language and linguistics must take Linguistics 380K and 380L or their equivalents. Arabic studies students must have sufficient competence in Fusha to participate fully in courses conducted exclusively in Arabic and must pass a test to demonstrate the advanced proficiency needed to use scholarly publications and participate in scholarly activities in Arabic. Hebrew studies students must demonstrate the ability to read Hebrew scholarly publications and to participate in scholarly activities in Hebrew.

Persian studies. Students must take at least two years of Arabic and two courses in literary criticism, as well as relevant courses in such fields as history, Islamic studies, and political science.

For More Information

Campus address: West Mall Office Building (WMB) 5.120, phone (512) 471-1365 or (512) 471-4690, fax (512) 471-4197; campus mail code: F1500

Mailing address: Graduate Program, Department of Middle Eastern Languages and Cultures, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712

E-mail: azilkha@mail.utexas.edu

URL: http://www.utexas.edu/cola/depts/melc/html/


Top of File     
      

Arabic Courses: ARA
Hebrew Courses: HEB
Middle Eastern Languages and Cultures Courses: MEL
Persian Courses: PRS
Turkish Courses: TUR

Graduate Catalog
Contents
Chapter 1 - Graduate Study
Chapter 2 - Admission and Registration
Chapter 3 - Degree Requirements
Chapter 4 - Fields of Study
Chapter 5 - Members of Graduate Studies Committees
Appendix - Course Abbreviations

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Office of the Registrar
University of Texas at Austin

26 July 2001. Registrar's Web Team

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