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UT Austin
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Grad Catalog 03-05

CONTENTS

CHAPTER 1
Graduate Study

CHAPTER 2
Admission and
Registration

CHAPTER 3
Degree
Requirements

CHAPTER 4
Fields
of Study

CHAPTER 5
Members of
Graduate Studies
Committees

APPENDIX
Course
Abbreviations

 

    

Electrical and Computer Engineering

--continued

 

Graduate Courses

The faculty has approval to offer the following courses in the academic years 2003-2004 and 2004-2005; however, not all courses are taught each semester or summer session. Students should consult the Course Schedule to determine which courses and topics will be offered during a particular semester or summer session. The Course Schedule may also reflect changes made to the course inventory after the publication of this catalog.

Unless otherwise stated below, each course meets for three lecture hours a week for one semester.

Electrical Engineering: E E

380K. Introduction to System Theory.
Introduction to linear dynamical systems and differential equations, state space analysis and applications to feedback control, functional analytic methods, realization theory, stability theory, and elements of optimal control. Prerequisite: Graduate standing; and credit or registration for Mathematics 365C or the equivalent, or consent of instructor.

380L. Computer Systems in Engineering.
May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

Topic 5: Engineering Programming Languages. Higher-level languages for engineering design and problem solving; object-oriented programming in C++ and UNIX systems programming.

Topic 6: Operating Systems. Input/output systems calls, drivers and descriptors, and integrated circuits. Design and implementation of hardware and software for a UNIX-like operating system.

Topic 7: Introduction to Pattern Recognition and Computer Vision. Pattern recognition topics, including Bayesian decision theory, maximum likelihood and estimation, nonparametric techniques, and linear discriminant functions. Computer vision topics, including geometric camera models and calibration, geometry of multiple views and stereopsis, structure from motion, and tracking. Emphasis varies each semester.

Topic 8: Computer Vision Systems. Discussion of current research results and exploration of new directions in computer vision systems. Includes linear discriminant functions, nonmetric methods, unsupervised learning and clustering, model-based vision, segmentation using probabilistic methods, and content-based image and video analysis. Application of the techniques to real-world vision systems. Emphasis varies each semester.

Topic 9: Artificial Neural Systems. Feed-forward networks, distributed associative memory, recurrent networks, self-organization, parallel implementation, and applications.

Topic 10: Data Mining. Analyzing large data sets for interesting and useful information. Includes on-line analytical processing, finding association rules, clustering, classification, and function approximations. Scalability of algorithms and real-life applications.

Topic 11: Mining the Web. Analysis of data and information available from the World Wide Web. Exploiting the hyperlink structure of the Web for developing better search engines. Content analysis, information retrieval, clustering, and hierarchical categorization of Web documents. Web usage mining. Collaborative filtering and personalizing the Web. Additional prerequisite: Electrical Engineering 380L (Topic 10: Data Mining) or Computer Sciences 391L.

380N. Topics in System Theory.
May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, and Electrical Engineering 380K or consent of instructor.

Topic 1: Nonlinear Systems: Input-Output Properties.

Topic 2: Nonlinear Systems: Geometric Theory.

Topic 3: Adaptive Control Systems.

Topic 4: Learning Systems and Cybernetic Machines.

Topic 5: Stochastic Control Theory. Dynamic programming in finite and infinite horizon, models with imperfect state information, ergodic control problems, adaptive and risk-sensitive control. Additional prerequisite: Electrical Engineering 381J.

Topic 7: Computer Control of Manufacturing Systems.

Topic 8: Algorithms for Parallel and Distributed Computation. Same as Computational and Applied Mathematics 380N.

Topic 9: Fundamentals of Robotics and Mechatronics. Theory of robotics and mechatronics, with emphasis on control, sensing, actuation, low- and high-level vision. Introduction to manipulator geometry, kinematics, dynamics, and planning of trajectories. Robotics laboratory.

Topic 10: Robotics II.

Topic 11: Optimization in Engineering Systems. Formulation and solution of continuous optimization problems in engineering design.

381J. Probability and Stochastic Processes I.
Probability spaces, random variables, expectation, conditional expectation, stochastic convergence, characteristic functions, and limit theorems. Introduction to Markov and Gaussian processes, stationary processes, spectral representation, ergodicity, renewal processes, martingales, and applications to estimation, prediction, and queueing theory. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, and Electrical Engineering 351K or the equivalent.

381K. Topics in Communication Theory and Signal Processing.
May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

Topic 1: Detection Theory.

Topic 2: Digital Communications. Characterization of communication signals and systems (bandpass signals and systems, signal space representation, digitally modulated signals, and spectral characteristics), optimum receivers for additive white Gaussian noise (correlation demodulator, matched-filter demodulator, performance for binary and M-ary modulation, and noncoherent receivers), error control codes (block and convolutional), and bandlimited channels (ISI and equalization). Additional prerequisite: Electrical Engineering 351K, 351M, and 360K.

Topic 3: Satellite Communication. Overview of satellite communication systems, including analog and digital transmission, link budgets, RF aspects, onboard systems, earth stations, current satellite communication systems and services, Global Positioning Systems (GPS), the role of standards and regulations, and orbital mechanics. Additional prerequisite: A graduate or upper-division introductory communication course.

Topic 4: Performance Evaluation.

Topic 5: Advanced Telecommunication Networks. Methods and research issues in the performance evaluation and management of high-speed and mobile communication networks. Additional prerequisite: Electrical Engineering 380N (Topic 11: Optimization in Engineering Systems), 381J, and 381K (Topic 13).

Topic 6: Estimation Theory.

Topic 7: Information Theory. Source and channel coding theorems, Kolmogorov complexity, network information theory, and connections with large deviations. Additional prerequisite: Electrical Engineering 371M.

Topic 8: Digital Signal Processing. Signals and systems; generalized functions; z-transforms; Fourier series and transforms; fast Fourier transform; sampling, quantization, and aliasing; digital filter design; discrete-time random processes; multirate processing; filter banks and subband decomposition; nonlinear digital filters. Additional prerequisite: Electrical Engineering 351K and 351M.

Topic 9: Advanced Signal Processing. Signal modeling; optimum filtering; spectral estimation; fast algorithms; and applications in array signal processing, speech coding, and digital communication. Additional prerequisite: Electrical Engineering 351K, 381K (Topic 8), and Mathematics 340L.

Topic 11: Wireless Communications. Introduction to fundamental aspects of wireless communications. Channel modeling, radio propagation, cellular concepts, fading and multipath countermeasures (equalization, diversity, channel coding), spread spectrum, and basic multiple access techniques. Additional prerequisite: Electrical Engineering 351K and 371M, or their equivalents.

Topic 13: Analysis and Design of Communication Networks. Stochastic and deterministic traffic and queueing models. Techniques for call admission, routing, flow control, network optimization, estimation, and decision making in uncertain environments. Additional prerequisite: Electrical Engineering 381J and 382N (Topic 5: Communication Networks: Technology, Architectures, and Protocols).

Topic 14: Multidimensional Digital Signal Processing. Multidimensional signals and systems, multidimensional discrete Fourier analysis, discrete cosine transform, two-dimensional filters, beamforming, seismic processing, tomography, multidimensional multirate systems, image halftoning, and video processing. Additional prerequisite: Electrical Engineering 380K, 381K (Topic 8), or 383P (Topic 1: Fourier Optics).

381L. Digital Time Series Analysis and Applications.
Digital implementation of higher-order spectra and other techniques useful in analyzing, interpreting, and modeling random time series data from linear and nonlinear physical systems. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in engineering or natural sciences.

381M. Probability and Stochastic Processes II.
Random walk and Brownian motion; renewal and regenerative processes; Markov processes; ergodic theory; continuous parameter martingales; stochastic differential equations; diffusions; stochastic control; multidimensional stochastic models. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, and Electrical Engineering 381J or consent of instructor.

381V. New Topics in Communications, Networks, and Systems.
Three lecture hours a week for one semester, or as required by the topic. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

382C. Topics in Computer Engineering.
May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

Topic 1: Engineering Design of Software and Software Systems. The software development process; selection and application of software design methods; evaluation of software designs.

Topic 2: Creation and Maintenance of Distributed Software Systems. Creation of large distributed software applications, with emphasis on specification, failure models, correctness, security.

Topic 3: Verification and Validation of Software. Evaluation of software for correctness, efficiency, performance, and reliability.

Topic 4: Software/Hardware Engineering Project Management. Requirements for a project management plan; role of the manager of the software development life cycle; economic and customer-driven factors.

Topic 5: Large Software/Hardware/Communications Systems Engineering. Techniques used to specify and design systems of software, hardware, and communications components. Creation of a requirements document and system specification.

Topic 6: Software for Highly-Available Distributed Applications.

Topic 7: Software Architectures. Software engineering approaches; scenario-based engineering processes to analyze problem domain; domain modeling and representations; creation of component-based reference architecture providing an object-oriented representation of system requirements.

Topic 8: Methodologies for Hardware/Software Codesign. Techniques used to design complex hardware/software systems; emphasis on specification, modeling, estimation, partitioning, verification/validation, and synthesis.

Topic 9: Embedded Software Systems. Dataflow models, uniprocessor and multiprocessor scheduling, hardware/software codesign, hierarchical finite state machines, synchronous languages, reactive systems, synchronous/reactive languages, heterogeneous systems.

Topic 10: Empirical Studies in Software Engineering.

Topic 11: Requirements Engineering.

382L. Theory of Digital Systems.
May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, and Electrical Engineering 316 or consent of instructor.

Topic 1: Switching Theory. General theory and realization algorithms for combinational, sequential, and array logic.

Topic 2: Graph Theory and Applications. Elementary graph theory concepts; graph theory algorithms and applications in multicomputer architecture, switching and coding theory, data structures, computer networks, programming, algorithm analysis, diagnosis and fault tolerance.

382M. Design of Digital Systems.
May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

Topic 1: VLSI Testing. Hardware and software reliability analysis of digital systems; testing, design for testability, self-diagnosis, fault-tolerant logic design, error-detecting and error-correcting codes.

Topic 2: Dependable Computing. Design techniques for reliable, fault-tolerant, fail-safe and fail-soft systems; fault diagnosis and fault avoidance methods at program and system levels; experimental and commercial fault-tolerant computer systems.

Topic 4: Digital Systems Simulation. Uses and limitations of simulation algorithms for digital circuits and systems.

Topic 7: VLSI I. CMOS technology; structured digital circuits; VLSI systems; computer-aided design tools and theory for design automation; chip design.

Topic 8: VLSI II. Microelectronic systems architecture; VLSI circuit testing methods; integration of heterogeneous computer-aided design tools; wafer scale integration; advanced high-speed circuit design and integration.

Topic 9: Simulation Methods in CAD/VLSI. Techniques and algorithms for simulating large-scale digital and analog circuits.

Topic 10: Synthesis of Digital Systems. Automatic generation of gate-level implementations from HDL specifications; optimization of two-level, multilevel, and sequential circuits for area, speed, and testability.

Topic 11: Verification of Digital Systems. Automatic verification of digital systems; formal models and specifications, equivalence checking, design verification, temporal logic, BDDs, logical foundations, automata theory, recent developments.

Topic 12: System Design Metrics. Analysis of design at chip, board, and system levels; life cycle implications of design decisions, including design for testability effects on production and field service; economic and customer-driven factors.

Topic 13: Analysis and Design of Digital Integrated Circuits.

Topic 14: Analog Integrated Circuit Design.

Topic 15: Computer Performance Evaluation and Benchmarking. Performance metrics, benchmarks, measurement tools and techniques, simulation, trace generation, sampling, analytical modeling, workload characterization, statistical methods to compare alternatives, linear regression, and design of experiments.

Topic 16: Application-Specific Processing.

Topic 17: High-Level Synthesis of Digital Systems.

Topic 18: Java Processing. The Java run-time environment, Java Virtual Machine, processing Java in interpreted and JIT compilation modes, Java processors, Java benchmarks, characterization of Java workloads, performance impact of Java, optimizing microprocessors for Java.

Topic 19: Mixed-Signal System Design and Modeling.

382N. Computer Systems and Networks.
May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

Topic 3: Interconnection Networks. Topologies, routing algorithms, permutations, resource allocations, performance evaluation, fault tolerance, VLSI design, parallel/distributed algorithms, languages for specifying protocols, distributed operating systems.

Topic 4: Advanced Embedded Microcontroller Systems. Hardware and software design of microcontroller systems; applications, including communication systems; object-oriented and operating systems approaches to interfacing and resource management.

Topic 5: Communication Networks: Technology, Architectures, and Protocols. Network services and techniques, layered architectures, circuit and packet-switching networks, internetworking, switch architectures, control mechanisms, and economic issues.

Topic 10: Parallel Computer Architecture. Study of parallel computing, including models, algorithms, languages, compilers, interconnection networks, and architectures.

Topic 11: Distributed Systems. Concurrent programming languages, distributed algorithms, distributed operating systems, distributed data, formal models of concurrency, protection and security in computer networks.

Topic 12: Discrete Event Systems. Models for discrete event systems, state machines, Petri nets, algebraic models, temporal logic, control of discrete event systems, observability, stability, simulation.

Topic 14: High-Speed Computer Arithmetic I. Design of computer arithmetic units: fast adders, fast multipliers, dividers, and floating-point arithmetic units.

Topic 15: High-Speed Computer Arithmetic II. Advanced topics in computer arithmetic, including error correcting coding, residue number systems, CORDIC arithmetic, and VLSI implementation. Additional prerequisite: Electrical Engineering 382N (Topic 14).

Topic 16: Distributed Information System Security.

Topic 17: Superscalar Microprocessor Architectures. Superscalar processor architectures, comparison with VLIW processors, program parallelism, performance evaluation, trace generation, memory systems, branch prediction.

Topic 18: Distributed Systems II.

Topic 19: Microarchitecture.

382V. New Topics in Computer Engineering.
Three lecture hours a week for one semester, or as required by the topic. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

383L. Electromagnetic Field Theory.
Vector space, Green's function; equivalence theorem; vector potentials; plane, cylindrical, and spherical waves; radiation and scattering. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in electrical engineering, or graduate standing and consent of instructor.

383M. Microwave Field Theory.
Guided waves in cylindrical waveguides, microstrip lines, dielectric and optical waveguides; integrated circuits; periodic structures. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in electrical engineering, or graduate standing and consent of instructor.

383N. Theory of Electromagnetic Fields: Electrodynamics.
Intermediate electromagnetic field theory, with emphasis on the interaction of fields and material media, including anisotropic media. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

383P. Topics in Optical Processing and Laser Communications.
May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in engineering, mathematics, chemistry, or physics; or graduate standing and consent of instructor.

Topic 1: Fourier Optics. Fourier transforming properties of lenses, frequency analysis of optical imaging systems, spatial filtering, introduction to optical information processing and holography.

Topic 3: Techniques of Laser Communications. Optical propagation in crystalline media, harmonic generation, frequency conversion, and modulation systems.

Topic 4: Fiber and Integrated Optics I. Waveguiding in slabs, cylinders, and fibers. Optical fiber communications principles. Mode coupling. Guided-wave optical sources, modulators, and detectors.

Topic 5: Fiber and Integrated Optics II. Principles and practices of guided-wave optical sensor technology. Nonlinear optical effects in fibers, including amplification and fiber lasers.

Topic 6: Optoelectronic Devices. Optical fiber transmission. Light-emitting diodes and semiconductor lasers. Optical amplifiers. Photodetectors. Optoelectronic integrated circuits. Guided-wave devices.

Topic 7: Laboratory Projects in Optics. Same as Biomedical Engineering 383P. Additional prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Topic 8: Optoelectronic Interconnects.

383V. New Topics in Electromagnetics.
Three lecture hours a week for one semester, or as required by the topic. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

384N. Acoustics.
Same as Mechanical Engineering 384N. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

Topic 1: Acoustics I. Plane waves in fluids; transient and steady-state reflection and transmission; lumped elements; refraction; strings, membranes, and rooms; horns; ray acoustics; absorption and dispersion.

Topic 2: Acoustics II. Rigorous derivation of acoustic wave equation; spherical and cylindrical waves; source theory; vibrating piston; enclosures; waveguides; arrays; diffraction. Additional prerequisite: Electrical Engineering 384N (Topic 1) or Mechanical Engineering 384N (Topic 1: Acoustics I).

Topic 3: Electromechanical Sensors/Actuators. Same as Biomedical Engineering 384N (Topic 3: Electromechanical Sensors/Actuators). Electrical, mechanical, and acoustical dynamics; principles of energy conversion, transducer laws, and representation; effects of the transducer characteristics on accuracy and efficiency of energy transformation.

Topic 4: Nonlinear Acoustics. Distortion and shock formation in finite amplitude waves; harmonic generation and spectral interactions; absorption and dispersion; radiation pressure; acoustic streaming; weak shock theory; numerical modeling; diffraction of intense sound beams; parametric arrays.

Topic 5: Underwater Acoustics. Acoustical properties of the ocean; point sources and Green's functions; reflection phenomena; ray theory; normal mode theory; guided waves in horizontally stratified fluid media; WKB and parabolic approximations. Additional prerequisite: Electrical Engineering 384N (Topic 1), Mechanical Engineering 384N (Topic 1), or consent of instructor.

Topic 6: Noise Control. Acoustic modeling techniques; panel radiation theory; absorption, barrier, and enclosure design; diagnosis based on experimental data.

Topic 7: Ultrasonics. Same as Biomedical Engineering 384N (Topic 7: Ultrasonics). Acoustic wave propagation in liquids and solids and at interfaces; transducers, arrays; imaging and sonar systems.

385J, 685J. Topics in Biomedical Engineering.
Three lecture hours a week for one semester, or as required by the topic. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in engineering and consent of instructor. Only topic 17 is offered under the number 685J.

Topic 1: Cell and Tissue Anatomy and Physiology for Engineers. Electrical Engineering 385J is same as Biomedical Engineering 385J (Topic 1: Cell and Tissue Anatomy and Physiology for Engineers), Chemical Engineering 385J (Topic 1: Cell and Tissue Anatomy and Physiology for Engineers), and Mechanical Engineering 385J (Topic 1: Cell and Tissue Anatomy and Physiology for Engineers). An overview of cellular biology, including functional cellular anatomy, DNA replication and the cell cycle, protein synthesis, membrane structure and function, energy metabolism, cellular homeostasis, and cell repair and death; and functional anatomy and physiology of the basic tissues. Normally offered in the fall semester only.

Topic 2: Organ System Anatomy, Physiology, and Pathology for Engineers. Electrical Engineering 385J (Topic 2) is same as Biomedical Engineering 385J (Topic 2: Organ System Anatomy, Physiology, and Pathology for Engineers), Chemical Engineering 385J (Topic 2: Organ System Anatomy, Physiology, and Pathology for Engineers), and Mechanical Engineering 385J (Topic 2: Organ System Anatomy, Physiology, and Pathology for Engineers). The functional anatomy and physiology of the major human organ systems; representative pathologic disorders associated with these organs. An overview of general pathologic processes, with emphasis on the influences of normal and abnormal organ anatomy, physiology, and disease on the definition and solution of biomedical engineering problems. Two lecture hours and one three-hour laboratory a week for one semester. Normally offered in the spring semester only. Additional prerequisite: Electrical Engineering 385J (Topic 1) or the equivalent.

Topic 3: Bioelectric Phenomena. Electrical Engineering 385J (Topic 3) is same as Biomedical Engineering 385J (Topic 3: Bioelectric Phenomena), Chemical Engineering 385J (Topic 3: Bioelectric Phenomena), and Mechanical Engineering 385J (Topic 3: Bioelectric Phenomena). Examines the physiological bases of bioelectricity and the techniques required to record bioelectric phenomena both intracellularly and extracellularly; the representation of bioelectric activity by equivalent dipoles and the volume conductor fields produced. Normally offered in the fall semester only.

Topic 5: Cardiovascular Dynamics. Electrical Engineering 385J (Topic 5) is same as Biomedical Engineering 385J (Topic 5: Cardiovascular Dynamics), Chemical Engineering 385J (Topic 5: Cardiovascular Dynamics), and Mechanical Engineering 385J (Topic 5: Cardiovascular Dynamics). Anatomy, physiology, pathophysiology, and dynamics of the cardiovascular system, with emphasis on the design and application of electrical and mechanical devices for cardiac intervention. Normally offered in the fall semester only.

Topic 9: Laser-Tissue Interaction: Thermal. Electrical Engineering 385J (Topic 9) is same as Biomedical Engineering 385J (Topic 9: Laser-Tissue Interaction: Thermal), Chemical Engineering 385J (Topic 9: Laser-Tissue Interaction: Thermal), and Mechanical Engineering 385J (Topic 9: Laser-Tissue Interaction: Thermal). The thermal response of random media in interaction with laser irradiation. Calculation of the rate of heat production caused by direct absorption of the laser light, thermal damage, and ablation. Normally offered in the spring semester only.

Topic 11: Biomedical Engineering Hospital Interfaces. Electrical Engineering 385J (Topic 11) is same as Biomedical Engineering 385J (Topic 11: Biomedical Engineering Hospital Interfaces), Chemical Engineering 385J (Topic 11: Biomedical Engineering Hospital Interfaces), and Mechanical Engineering 385J (Topic 11: Biomedical Engineering Hospital Interfaces). Students gain firsthand knowledge of the instrumentation, procedures, and organization of a modern hospital. Class sessions are held in the different clinical services and laboratories of the hospital. Normally offered in the spring semester only.

Topic 12: Biomedical Heat Transfer. Electrical Engineering 385J (Topic 12) is same as Biomedical Engineering 385J (Topic 12: Biomedical Heat Transfer), Chemical Engineering 385J (Topic 12: Biomedical Heat Transfer), and Mechanical Engineering 385J (Topic 12: Biomedical Heat Transfer). Heat transfer in biological tissue; determination of thermodynamic and transport properties of tissue; thermal effects of blood perfusion; cryobiology; numerical modeling methods; clinical applications. Normally offered in the fall semester only. Additional prerequisite: Mechanical Engineering 339, Chemical Engineering 353, or the equivalent.

Topic 13: Molecular Recognition in Biology and Biotechnology. Electrical Engineering 385J (Topic 13) is same as Biomedical Engineering 385J (Topic 13: Molecular Recognition in Biology and Biotechnology), Chemical Engineering 385J (Topic 13: Molecular Recognition in Biology and Biotechnology), and Mechanical Engineering 385J (Topic 13: Molecular Recognition in Biology and Biotechnology).

Topic 15: Biosignal Analysis. Electrical Engineering 385J (Topic 15) is same as Biomedical Engineering 385J (Topic 15: Biosignal Analysis), Chemical Engineering 385J (Topic 15: Biosignal Analysis), and Mechanical Engineering 385J (Topic 15: Biosignal Analysis). Theory and classification of biological signals such as EEG, EKG, and EMG. Data acquisition and analysis procedures for biological signals, including computer applications. Normally offered in the spring semester only.

Topic 16: Laser-Tissue Interaction: Optical. Electrical Engineering 385J (Topic 16) is same as Biomedical Engineering 385J (Topic 16: Laser-Tissue Interaction: Optical), Chemical Engineering 385J (Topic 16: Laser-Tissue Interaction: Optical), and Mechanical Engineering 385J (Topic 16: Laser-Tissue Interaction: Optical). The optical behavior of random media such as tissue in interaction with laser irradiation. Approximate transport equation methods to predict the absorption and scattering parameters of laser light inside tissue. Port-wine stain treatment; cancer treatment by photochemotherapy; and cardiovascular applications. Normally offered in the fall semester only.

Topic 17: Biomedical Instrumentation II: Real-Time Computer-Based Systems. Electrical Engineering 385J (Topic 17) is same as Biomedical Engineering 385J (Topic 17: Biomedical Instrumentation II: Real-Time Computer-Based Systems), Chemical Engineering 385J (Topic 17: Biomedical Instrumentation II: Real-Time Computer-Based Systems), and Mechanical Engineering 385J (Topic 17: Biomedical Instrumentation II: Real-Time Computer-Based Systems). Electrical Engineering 685J (Topic 17) is same as Biomedical Engineering 685J (Topic 17: Biomedical Instrumentation II: Real-Time Computer-Based Systems). Design, testing, patient safety, electrical noise, biomedical measurement transducers, therapeutics, instrumentation electronics, and microcomputer interfaces. Several case studies are presented. Additional topics are covered in Electrical Engineering 685J (Topic 17). Four structured laboratories and an individual project laboratory. Electrical Engineering 385J (Topic 17) and 685J (Topic 17) normally meet with Biomedical Engineering 385J (Topic 17) and 685J (Topic 17). Normally offered in the fall semester only.

Topic 18: Biomedical Image Processing. Electrical Engineering 385J (Topic 18) is same as Biomedical Engineering 385J (Topic 18: Biomedical Image Processing), Chemical Engineering 385J (Topic 18: Biomedical Image Processing), and Mechanical Engineering 385J (Topic 18: Biomedical Image Processing). Physical principles and signal processing techniques used in thermographic, ultrasonic, and radiographic imaging, including image reconstruction from projections such as CT scanning, MRI, and millimeter wave determination of temperature profiles. Normally offered in the spring semester only. Additional prerequisite: Electrical Engineering 371R.

Topic 20: Network Thermodynamics in Biophysics. Electrical Engineering 385J (Topic 20) is same as Biomedical Engineering 385J (Topic 20: Network Thermodynamics in Biophysics), Chemical Engineering 385J (Topic 20: Network Thermodynamics in Biophysics), and Mechanical Engineering 385J (Topic 20: Network Thermodynamics in Biophysics). Modeling and simulation methods for nonlinear biological processes, including coupling across multienergy domains; practical implementation by bond graph techniques. Normally offered in the spring semester only. Additional prerequisite: Mechanical Engineering 344 or consent of instructor.

Topic 23: Optical Spectroscopy. Electrical Engineering 385J (Topic 23) is same as Biomedical Engineering 385J (Topic 23: Optical Spectroscopy), Chemical Engineering 385J (Topic 23: Optical Spectroscopy), and Mechanical Engineering 385J (Topic 23: Optical Spectroscopy). Measurement and interpretation of spectra: steady-state and time-resolved absorption, fluorescence, phosphorescence, and Raman spectroscopy in the ultraviolet, visible, and infrared portions of the spectrum. Normally offered in the fall semester only.

Topic 26: Therapeutic Heating. Electrical Engineering 385J (Topic 26) is same as Biomedical Engineering 385J (Topic 26: Therapeutic Heating), Chemical Engineering 385J (Topic 26: Therapeutic Heating), and Mechanical Engineering 385J (Topic 26: Therapeutic Heating). Engineering aspects of electromagnetic fields that have therapeutic applications: diathermy (short wave, microwave, and ultrasound), electrosurgery (thermal damage processes), stimulation of excitable tissue, and electrical safety. Normally offered in the spring semester only.

Topic 27: The Biotechnology Revolution and Engineering Ethics. Electrical Engineering 385J (Topic 27) is same as Biomedical Engineering 385J (Topic 27: The Biotechnology Revolution and Engineering Ethics), Chemical Engineering 385J (Topic 27: The Biotechnology Revolution and Engineering Ethics), and Mechanical Engineering 385J (Topic 27: The Biotechnology Revolution and Engineering Ethics). The history and status of genetic engineering; potential applications in medicine, agriculture, and industry; ethical and social issues surrounding the engineering of biological organisms; ethics in engineering practice in physical and biological realms. Normally offered in the spring semester only.

Topic 28: Noninvasive Optical Tomography. Electrical Engineering 385J (Topic 28) is same as Biomedical Engineering 385J (Topic 28: Noninvasive Optical Tomography), Chemical Engineering 385J (Topic 28: Noninvasive Optical Tomography), and Mechanical Engineering 385J (Topic 28: Noninvasive Optical Tomography). Basic principles of optical tomographic imaging of biological materials for diagnostic or therapeutic applications. Optical-based tomographic imaging techniques including photothermal, photoacoustic, and coherent methodologies.

Topic 29: Transport Processes in Biological Systems. Electrical Engineering 385J (Topic 29) is same as Biomedical Engineering 385J (Topic 29: Transport Processes in Biological Systems), Chemical Engineering 385J (Topic 29: Transport Processes in Biological Systems), and Mechanical Engineering 385J (Topic 29: Transport Processes in Biological Systems). Introduction to engineering analysis of transport phenomena in living systems, including fluid flow, heat transfer, pharmacokinetics, and membrane fluxes with clinical applications.

Topic 30: Introduction to Biomechanics. Electrical Engineering 385J (Topic 30) is same as Biomedical Engineering 385J (Topic 30: Introduction to Biomechanics), Chemical Engineering 385J (Topic 30: Introduction to Biomechanics), and Mechanical Engineering 385J (Topic 30: Introduction to Biomechanics). Modeling and simulation of human movement; neuromuscular control; computer applications; introduction to experimental techniques. Three lecture hours and one laboratory hour a week for one semester.

Topic 31: Biomedical Instrumentation I. Electrical Engineering 385J (Topic 31) is same as Biomedical Engineering 385J (Topic 31: Biomedical Instrumentation I), Chemical Engineering 385J (Topic 31: Biomedical Instrumentation I), and Mechanical Engineering 385J (Topic 31: Biomedical Instrumentation I). Application of electrical engineering techniques to analysis and instrumentation in biological sciences: pressure, flow, temperature measurement; bioelectrical signals; pacemakers; ultrasonics; electrical safety; electrotherapeutics.

Topic 32: Projects in Biomedical Engineering. Electrical Engineering 385J (Topic 32) is same as Biomedical Engineering 385J (Topic 32: Projects in Biomedical Engineering), Chemical Engineering 385J (Topic 32: Projects in Biomedical Engineering), and Mechanical Engineering 385J (Topic 32: Projects in Biomedical Engineering). An in-depth examination of selected topics, such as optical and thermal properties of laser interaction with tissue; measurement of perfusion in the microvascular system; diagnostic imaging; interaction of living systems with electromagnetic fields; robotic surgical tools; ophthalmic instrumentation; noninvasive cardiovascular measurements. Three lecture hours and six laboratory hours a week for one semester. Additional prerequisite: Electrical Engineering 385J (Topic 31).

Topic 33: Neurophysiology/Prosthesis Design. Electrical Engineering 385J (Topic 33) is same as Biomedical Engineering 385J (Topic 33: Neurophysiology/Prosthesis Design), Chemical Engineering 385J (Topic 33: Neurophysiology/Prosthesis Design), and Mechanical Engineering 385J (Topic 33: Neurophysiology/Prosthesis Design). The structure and function of the human brain. Discussion of selected neurological diseases in conjunction with normal neurophysiology. Study of neuroprosthesis treatments and design philosophy, functional neural stimulation, and functional muscular stimulation. Normally offered in the fall semester only.

Topic 34: Biopolymers and Drug/Gene Delivery. Electrical Engineering 385J (Topic 34) is same as Biomedical Engineering 385J (Topic 34: Biopolymers and Drug/Gene Delivery), Chemical Engineering 385J (Topic 34: Biopolymers and Drug/Gene Delivery), and Mechanical Engineering 385J (Topic 34: Biopolymers and Drug/Gene Delivery). Introduction to different classes of biopolymers. Biodegradability and biocompatibility. Interaction of cells and tissues with polymers and polymeric implants; immunology of biomaterials. Applications of polymers in medicine and biology. Gene therapy and generic immunization. The use of biopolymers and drug/gene delivery in organ regeneration and tissue engineering. Offered in the fall semester only.

385V. New Topics in Biomedical Engineering.
Three lecture hours a week for one semester, or as required by the topic. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

390C. Statistical Methods in Engineering and Quality Assurance.
The interpretation of data from designed experiments and production processes. Topics include probability distributions, confidence intervals, analysis of variance, hypothesis testing, factorial designs, and quality control data. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in engineering and a course in probability and statistics, or graduate standing and consent of instructor.

390V. New Topics in Manufacturing Systems Engineering.
Three lecture hours a week for one semester, or as required by the topic. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

391C. Technical Entrepreneurship.
Introduction to the technology-based company: entrepreneurship, intrepreneurship, strategic planning, finance, marketing, sales, operations, research and development, manufacturing, and management. Student teams form hypothetical companies and simulate their ventures over an extended period; presentations and reports are required. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

392K. Antenna Theory and Practice.
Modern antenna systems for receiving and transmitting, including driven and parasitic arrays, horns, parabolic and other antennas. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in electrical engineering, or graduate standing and consent of instructor.

393C. Plasma Dynamics.
May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in engineering, physics, chemistry, or mathematics; or graduate standing and consent of instructor.

Topic 1: Introduction to Plasma Dynamics. Plasma properties, including collective effects, Debye shielding, quasineutrality, the plasma frequency, collisions. Single particle motions in electric and magnetic fields. Particle drifts, adiabatic invariants, cyclotron resonance.

394. Topics in Power System Engineering.
Steady-state and transient analysis; symmetrical components, stability, protection, relaying. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in electrical engineering, or graduate standing and consent of instructor.

Topic 1: Power System Instrumentation and Control. Study of control functions related to energy control centers and to power plant control.

Topic 3: Advanced Apparatus Design Topics. Study of unconventional machinery; power electronic drive systems for machines.

Topic 4: Economic Operation of Power Systems. Advanced techniques for operating power systems in the most economic manner while meeting various network constraints; economic dispatch, penalty factors, optimal power flow.

Topic 5: Power System Dynamics and Stability. Computer methods for solving and predicting the behavior of networks during short-term and long-term disturbances.

Topic 6: Advanced Electric Machinery. Detailed modeling and design of large induction and synchronous machines.

Topic 7: Power Electronic Devices and Systems. A study of power electronic components and circuits; HVDC converters; electronic drives for machines; AC/DC converters.

Topic 8: Power Transmission and Distribution Topics. Calculation of electric fields, standing waves, audible noise, corona, and high voltage effects.

Topic 9: Power Quality. The study of electrical transients, switching surges, lightning, and other phenomena that cause deviations in 60-hertz sinusoidal voltages and currents.

Topic 10: Electromechanical Dynamics. Same as Mechanical Engineering 384E (Topic 1: Electromechanical Dynamics). Maxwell's equations and transient response of electrical machines. Only one of the following may be counted: Electrical Engineering 394 (Topic 10), 397K (Topic: Electromechanical Dynamics), Mechanical Engineering 397 (Topic: Electromechanical Devices). Additional prerequisite: Electrical Engineering 335M or 341 or Mechanical Engineering 335M.

Topic 11: Design of Electrical Machines. Same as Mechanical Engineering 384E (Topic 2: Design of Electrical Machines). Electrical and mechanical design of electrical machines. Only one of the following may be counted: Electrical Engineering 394 (Topic 11), 397K (Topic: Design of Electrical Machines), Mechanical Engineering 397 (Topic: Design of Electrical Machines). Additional prerequisite: Electrical Engineering 335M or 341 or Mechanical Engineering 335M.

Topic 12: Open-Access Transmission. Terms and conditions, pricing methodologies, independent system operators, ancillary services, auctions and bid strategies, losses and allocation policies.

Topic 13: Intelligent Motion for Robotics and Control.

394J. Energy Systems.
Same as Mechanical Engineering 394J. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in engineering and consent of instructor.

Topic 1: Power System Engineering I. Physical features, operational characteristics, and analytical models for major electric power systems and components.

Topic 2: Power System Engineering II. Advanced techniques for solving large power networks; loadflow, symmetrical components, short circuit analysis.

Topic 3: Economic Analysis of Power Systems. Energy resources, cost characteristics of electricity supply, electricity consumption and supply patterns, and impact of regulatory policy.

Topic 4: Environmental Engineering and Energy Systems. Environmental effects and controls for air, water, and land pollution for power systems.

Topic 5: Power System Planning and Practices. The economics of integrated resource planning.

Topic 6: Energy Conversion Engineering. Thermal analysis and operating characteristics of systems for electric power generation.

Topic 7: Power System Harmonics. The study of nonsinusoidal voltages and currents in power systems. Detailed modeling and simulation of harmonics sources, system response, and effects on equipment.

394V. New Topics in Energy Systems.
Three lecture hours a week for one semester, or as required by the topic. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

396K. Solid-State Device Theory.
Theory of electron, magnetic, and electro-optic devices. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

Topic 1: Metal Oxide Semiconductor Devices: Physics and Technology.

Topic 2: Semiconductor Physics. Introduction to the fundamental physics of charge carrier states in semiconductors, charge carrier interactions among themselves and with the environment, and charge transport in semiconductors and their heterostructures. Additional prerequisite: An introductory course in quantum mechanics.

Topic 4: Synthesis, Growth, and Analysis of Electronic Materials.

Topic 5: Superconducting Electronic Devices.

Topic 6: Magnetic Phenomena in Materials.

Topic 7: MOS Integrated Circuit Process Integration.

Topic 8: VLSI Fabrication Techniques.

Topic 9: Localized versus Itinerant Electrons in Solids. Same as Mechanical Engineering 386R (Topic 1: Localized versus Itinerant Electrons in Solids). Description of electrons, from free atoms to crystals; band theory contrasted with crystal-field theory; evolution of electronic properties on passing from magnetic insulators to normal metals, from ionic to covalent solids, from single-valent compounds to mixed-valent systems; electron-lattice interactions and phase transitions; many examples. Additional prerequisite: A semester of quantum mechanics and a semester of solid-state science or technology.

Topic 10: Ionic Conductors. Same as Mechanical Engineering 386T (Topic 1: Ionic Conductors).

Topic 11: High-Temperature Superconductors. Same as Mechanical Engineering 386T (Topic 2: High-Temperature Superconductors).

Topic 12: Catalytic Electrodes. Same as Mechanical Engineering 386T (Topic 3: Catalytic Electrodes).

Topic 13: Magnetic Materials. Same as Mechanical Engineering 386T (Topic 4: Magnetic Materials).

Topic 14: Optical Interconnects.

Topic 15: Optoelectronics Integrated Circuits.

Topic 16: Semiconductor Lasers.

Topic 17: Localized-Electron Phenomena. Same as Mechanical Engineering 386R (Topic 2: Localized-Electron Phenomena). Analysis of the variation in physical properties versus chemical composition of several groups of isostructural transition-metal compounds. Additional prerequisite: A semester of solid-state science and/or quantum mechanics.

Topic 19: Plasma Processing of Semiconductors I. Plasma analysis using Boltzmann and fluid equations; plasma properties, including Debye length, quasineutrality, and sheaths; basic collisional properties, including Coulomb and polarization scattering; analysis of capacitive and wave-heated plasma processing reactors.

Topic 20: Plasma Processing of Semiconductors II. Plasma chemistry and equilibrium; analysis of molecular collisions; chemical kinetics and surface processes; plasma discharge particle and energy balance; analysis of inductive and DC plasma processing reactors; plasma etching, deposition, and implantation.

Topic 21: Submicron Device Physics and Techniques.

Topic 22: Semiconductor Microlithography.

Topic 23: Semiconductor Heterostructures.

Topic 24: Microwave Devices.

Topic 25: Organic and Polymer Semiconductor Devices.

Topic 26: Microelectromechanical Systems.

Topic 27: Charge Transport in Organic Semiconductors.

396M. Quantum Electronics.
Quantum mechanical principles as applied to electron devices, lasers, and electro-optics; material properties and interaction of radiation and material. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in electrical engineering or physics, or graduate standing and consent of the graduate adviser.

Topic 1: Introductory Quantum Electronics. Basic quantum mechanics and applications to solid-state phenomena and lasers.

396V. New Topics in Solid-State Electronics.
Three lecture hours a week for one semester, or as required by the topic. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

197C, 297C, 397C, 697C, 997C. Research Problems.
Problem selected by the student with approval of the department. For each semester hour of credit earned, the equivalent of one lecture hour a week for one semester. Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in electrical engineering and consent of the graduate adviser.

197G, 297G, 397G, 697G, 997G. Research Problems.
Problem selected by the student with approval of the department. For each semester hour of credit earned, the equivalent of one lecture hour a week for one semester. Offered on the letter-grade basis only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in electrical engineering and consent of instructor and the graduate adviser.

397K. Advanced Studies in Electrical Engineering.
Selection of topics based on needs of an adequate number of students. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in electrical engineering and consent of instructor.

Topic 1: Conference Course. May be repeated for credit.

397M. Graduate Research Internship.
Research associated with enrollment in the Graduate Research Internship Program (GRIP). Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in electrical engineering and consent of instructor.

197S, 297S, 397S. Graduate Seminar in Electrical Engineering.
One, two, or three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit. Some sections of Electrical Engineering 197S are offered on the letter-grade basis only; others are offered on the credit/no credit basis only. These sections are identified in the Course Schedule. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

698. Thesis.
The equivalent of three lecture hours a week for two semesters. Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Prerequisite: For 698A, graduate standing in electrical engineering and consent of the graduate adviser; for 698B, Electrical Engineering 698A.

398R. Master's Report.
Preparation of a report to fulfill the requirement for the master's degree under the report option. The equivalent of three lecture hours a week for one semester. Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in electrical engineering and consent of the graduate adviser.

398T. Supervised Teaching in Electrical Engineering.
Teaching under close supervision for one semester, attending group meetings or individual consultations, and submitting reports as required. Three lecture hours a week, or the equivalent, for one semester. Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and appointment as a teaching assistant.

399R, 699R, 999R. Dissertation.
Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Prerequisite: Admission to candidacy for the doctoral degree.

399W, 699W, 999W. Dissertation.
Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Prerequisite: Electrical Engineering 399R, 699R, or 999R.

 


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About the Program: Electrial and Computer Engineering

      

 

Graduate Catalog
Contents
Chapter 1 - Graduate Study
Chapter 2 - Admission and Registration
Chapter 3 - Degree Requirements
Chapter 4 - Fields of Study
Chapter 5 - Members of Graduate Studies Committees
Appendix - Course Abbreviations

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Academic Calendars
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University of Texas at Austin

12 August 2003. Office of the Registrar

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