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    Contents

1

Graduate Study

2

Admission and Registration

3

Degree Requirements

4

Fields of Study

5

Members of Graduate Studies Committees


 


Appendix
of course abbreviations


Graduate Catalog | 2005-2007
Red McCombs School of Business

Management Science and Information Systems

to courses in LEB Legal Environment of Business | MIS Management Information Systems | MSC Management Science | R M Risk Management | STA Statistics »
 

Doctor of Philosophy

Facilities for Graduate Work

Faculty members and doctoral students in management science and information systems are involved in the work of the Center for Business, Technology, and Law and the Center for Research in Electronic Commerce. The McCombs School contains additional research centers that support graduate work, as well as the school's physical facilities and computing systems.

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Areas of Study

The doctoral degree program has three independent concentrations: information systems; risk analysis and decision making; and supply chain and operations management.

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Graduate Studies Committee

The following faculty members served on the Graduate Studies Committee in the spring semester 2004-2005.

John R. Allison
Mark B. Baker
Anantaram Balakrishnan
Anitesh Barua
Patrick L. Brockett
Alina Chircu
Frank B. Cross
Paul Damien
James S. Dyer
Betsy S. Greenberg
Bin Gu
Sirkka L. Jarvenpaa
Jonathan Jay Koehler
Prabhudev Konana
Leon S. Lasdon
Reuben R. McDaniel Jr.
John R. Mote
Paula C. Murray
Robert A. Prentice
Gautam Ray
Timothy W. Ruefli
Maytal Saar-Tsechansky
Thomas W. Sager
Steven R. Salbu
Billy M. Shaw
Thomas S. Shively
David B. Spence
Huseyin Tanriverdi
Kerem Tomak
Stathis Tompaidis
Andrew B. Whinston
Gang Yu
Thaleia Zariphopoulou
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Admission Requirements

Admission to the program is extremely competitive. The admission decision is based on the applicant's academic record, test scores, personal statement, resume, and letters of recommendation.

Students must enter the program in a fall semester.

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Degree Requirements

Information Systems

To be admitted to candidacy for the doctoral degree, the student must (1) fulfill the core course requirements described below; (2) pass a written qualifying exam that covers the material in the core courses; (3) submit a qualifying paper, which is reviewed by the student's adviser and two other faculty members; (4) complete course requirements for two minor areas (three courses in the first area and two courses in the second area); (5) submit a candidacy paper, which must be accepted by the student's dissertation committee; and (6) submit a dissertation proposal, if one is required by the student's dissertation chair.

Core courses. During the fall semester of their first year of graduate study, all students must complete Economics 387L (Topic 1: Microeconomics I) and Management Information Systems 381N (Topic 2: Information Systems Concepts and Readings) and 381N (Topic 4: Decision Support Systems). In the spring semester of their first year, students in the electronic commerce track must complete Economics 387L (Topic 3: Microeconomics II) and Management Information Systems 381N (Topic 15: Introduction to Electronic Commerce); those in the organizational track must complete Management Information Systems 381N (Topic 12: Advanced Information Systems Readings) and 382N (Topic 3: E-Business Application Development). All students must maintain a graduate grade point average of at least 3.33.

Written qualifying examination. After satisfying the core course requirements above, at the end of his or her second semester in the program, the student must take a written qualifying exam that covers material from the three common core courses and the two core courses in the student's track. If a student does not pass the exam on the first attempt, he or she may take it again about three months later. The student may not take the exam more than two times.

Qualifying paper. After completing the core courses, the student writes the qualifying paper, which surveys the field of information systems and identifies and examines issues for future research. The paper is evaluated by the student's adviser and two other faculty members. Each student also presents the qualifying paper to the information systems faculty and doctoral degree students.

Candidacy paper. After satisfying the requirements above, and within thirty-six months of entering the program, the student must submit a candidacy paper, which focuses on his or her area of research and provides background for the dissertation. At this point, the student's dissertation committee is organized. This committee reviews the candidacy paper and evaluates it during an oral presentation. The presentation is open to all interested parties.

Dissertation proposal. The requirement of a dissertation proposal is at the discretion of the student's dissertation chair. In the dissertation proposal, the student identifies an issue for dissertation research. The proposal should provide relevant background on the topic and should defend the originality and research contribution of the proposed work. It is reviewed by the student's committee and evaluated during an oral proposal defense. The oral defense may be concurrent with the candidacy paper presentation and is open to all interested parties.

Risk Analysis and Decision Making

To be admitted to candidacy for the doctoral degree, the student must (1) fulfill the core course requirements described below; (2) pass a written qualifying exam that covers the material in the first-year core courses; (3) complete the requirements of one of three tracks: decision analysis, quantitative finance, or risk managment; and (4) fulfill the oral dissertation proposal defense requirement described below.

First-year core courses. During the first year of graduate study, the student must take five core courses: Mathematical Statistics I, Microeconomics I, Stochastic Processes and Applications, Mathematical Statistics II, and Optimization. The student must earn a grade of at least B in each course and a grade point average in the five courses of at least 3.50. A well-prepared student may seek to fulfill the core course requirement by earning satisfactory grades on the final examinations for some of these courses rather than by registering for them. In rare circumstances, a student may receive a waiver for a core course without taking the final exam. These circumstances are determined by the faculty for the concentration and the graduate adviser. In either case, the student does not receive graduate credit for the course, the grade is not counted toward the required average, and the subject matter of the course must be included in the qualifying exam.

Written qualifying examination. At the end of his or her second semester in the program, after satisfying the first-year core course requirements above, the student must pass a written qualifying exam that covers material from the five core courses. If the student does not pass the exam on the first attempt, he or she may take it again. The student may not take the exam more than twice.

Second-year core courses. During the second year of graduate study, the student must take the remaining four core courses: Econometrics, Asset Pricing Theory, Game Theory, and Mathematics of Finance. The student must earn a grade of at least B in each course and a grade point average in the four courses of at least 3.50.

Track requirements. Students in the decision analysis or risk management track must complete three courses from a list approved by their adviser. Students in the quantitative finance track must complete five courses from such a list.

Oral dissertation proposal defense. After satisfying the requirements above, and within thirty-six months of entering the program, the student must pass an oral dissertation proposal defense. The proposal defense consists of a presentation before the student's dissertation committee, followed by a question period. The presentation is open to all interested parties. The questions during this session are directed toward clarifying the presentation and determining whether the student has a solid grasp of the basic material needed for research in his or her specialization. The student passes the proposal defense by obtaining a positive vote from at least four of the five faculty members on the dissertation committee.

Supply Chain and Operations Management

To be admitted to candidacy for the doctoral degree in this concentration, the student must (1) fulfill the core course requirements described below; (2) pass a written qualifying exam that covers the material from the first-year core courses; (3) fulfill the minor field requirement; and (4) pass the research paper and comprehensive exam requirement described below.

Core courses. The student must complete the following courses in the first two years.The student must earn a grade of at least B in each course and a grade point average in the required courses of at least 3.50.

  1. Core methodology courses in linear optimization and stochastic processes, and Microeconomics I, to be completed in the first year of the program; and either Introduction to Research Methods or Mathematical Statistics, to be completed by the end of the second year.
  2. Core contextual courses: At least three courses on the theory of supply chain and operations management, dealing with topics such as supply chain optimization models, supply chain economic models, stochastic models/inventory theory, and product development.
  3. At least three advanced graduate courses from the following fields: (a) optimization, including courses such as Network Optimization, Nonlinear Programming, Integer Programming, and Stochastic Programming; (b) stochastic processes, including courses such as Queueing Theory and Advanced Stochastic Processes; (c) economics, including courses such as Microeconomics, Econometrics, and Game Theory; and (d) statistics.

Written qualifying examination. After completing the three first-year core methodology courses described above, the student must pass a written qualifying exam that covers material from these courses.

Minor field. Students are also required to take at least two courses in a minor field other than supply chain and operations management before entering candidacy.

Research paper and comprehensive examination. By the end of the second year, the student must complete a research paper under the guidance of an adviser and must pass written and oral comprehensive exams. The oral exam consists of the student's presentation of his or her research, followed by questions from committee members.

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For More Information

Campus address: College of Business Administration Building (CBA) 5.202, phone (512) 471-3322, fax (512) 471-0587; campus mail code: B6500

Mailing address: The University of Texas at Austin, Doctoral Program, Department of Information, Risk, and Operations Management, 1 University Station B6500, Austin TX 78712

E-mail: iromphd@mccombs.utexas.edu

URL: http://www.mccombs.utexas.edu/dept/irom/phd/

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Graduate Catalog | 2005-2007 Management Science and Information Systems
program | courses

Fields of Study

    Office of the Registrar     University of Texas at Austin copyright 2005
    Official Publications 16 Aug 2005