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Appendix
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Graduate Catalog | 2005-2007
College of Communication

Communication Studies

to courses in CMS Communication Studies »
to program in Communication Studies »
 

Graduate Courses

The faculty has approval to offer the following courses in the academic years 2005-2006 and 2006-2007; however, not all courses are taught each semester or summer session. Students should consult the Course Schedule to determine which courses and topics will be offered during a particular semester or summer session. The Course Schedule may also reflect changes made to the course inventory after the publication of this catalog.

Unless otherwise stated below, each course meets for three lecture hours a week for one semester.

CMS | Communication Studies

180E, 280E, 380E, 480E. Conference Course in Communication Studies. Readings in the literature of communication studies designed to expand the graduate student's opportunity for individual consultation both in research and in informational aspects of the work. One, two, three, or four conference hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

081M. Introduction to Graduate Studies in Human Communication. Discussion of communication research, theory, and professional development. One lecture hour a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Admission to the graduate program in communication studies.

383K. Communication Theory. Survey of philosophical and language-based approaches to communication; theory construction, research practices, scholarly writing. Communication Studies 383K and Speech 383K may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Some sections also require consent of instructor or the graduate adviser; these are identified in the Course Schedule.

383L. Language and Social Interaction. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Communication Studies 383L and Speech 383L may not both be counted unless the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Some sections also require consent of instructor or the graduate adviser; these are identified in the Course Schedule.

Topic 1: Theories of Interaction. Theoretical overview of the interactionist paradigm, including the work of G. H. Mead, Bateson, Geertz, Goffman, Kendon, and Bruner.

Topic 2: Codes and Contexts. Codes and the frames/contexts for interaction: pragmatics, linguistic anthropology, symbolic interactionism, ethnomethodology, and discourse analysis.

383M. Communication and Culture. Analysis of the interplay of culture, language, and communication from classical and contemporary perspectives. Examination of meaning systems. Communication Studies 383M and Speech 383M may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Some sections also require consent of instructor or the graduate adviser; these are identified in the Course Schedule.

384K. Communication and Ethnography. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Communication Studies 384K and Speech 384K may not both be counted unless the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

Topic 1: Reading the Ethnography of Communication. Reading of a wide selection of ethnographies of speaking. Students conduct short individual field studies and write a review.

Topic 2: Writing the Ethnography of Communication. Intense analysis of selected studies, with emphasis on ethnographic writing. Students conduct group fieldwork and develop their writing skills.

Topic 3: Microethnography of Interaction. Introduction to the study of details of human interaction: the moment-by-moment organization of speech and embodied communication; the roles of different media of communication, such as language, gesture, and space; the construction of context; uses of the material environment; and the distribution of information in collaborative work settings.

386K. Theories of Interpersonal Communication. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Communication Studies 386K and Speech 386K may not both be counted unless the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Some sections also require consent of instructor or the graduate adviser; these are identified in the Course Schedule.

Topic 1: Interpersonal Communication Theory. Exploration of theoretical perspectives such as general systems theory; symbolic interactionism; rules theory; theories of language and nonverbal coding; theories of meaning; theories of information processing; and theories of persuasion. Theories pertinent to interpersonal, group, and mass interaction.

Topic 2: Applied Interpersonal Communication. The application of interpersonal communication theory and research in personal and professional settings and to practical problems in those settings.

Topic 3: Current Perspectives in Interpersonal Communication. Recent advances in theory and research in interpersonal communication.

386L. Communication in Small Groups. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Communication Studies 386L and Speech 386L may not both be counted unless the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Some sections also require consent of instructor or the graduate adviser; these are identified in the Course Schedule.

Topic 1: Group Communication Processes. Study of theory and research in the dynamics of small groups, with emphasis on the interaction of message variables with other variables such as leadership, affiliation, cohesiveness, and social power.

Topic 2: Communication Networks in Groups and Organizations. Theory and research on social networks in intraorganizational and interorganizational contexts. Students design and conduct a network study.

386M. Persuasion Theory. Analysis of current theories and research in social influence and attitudinal and behavioral change. Communication Studies 386M and Speech 386M may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

386N. Research in Communication Studies. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Communication Studies 386N and Speech 386N may not both be counted unless the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Some sections also require consent of instructor or the graduate adviser; these are identified in the Course Schedule.

Topic 1: Quantitative Research Methods. Broad coverage of social scientific techniques for collecting and analyzing communication data; includes measurement, design, and other areas. Some sections focus on organizational research.

Topic 2: Qualitative Research Methods. The use of observational and interviewing research techniques for studying human communication.

386P. Seminar in Analysis of Communication Interaction. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Communication Studies 386P and Speech 386P may not both be counted unless the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Some sections also require consent of instructor or the graduate adviser; these are identified in the Course Schedule.

Topic 1: Nonverbal Communication. Current theory and research in such areas as involvement and intimacy, gender, touch, space, environment, nonverbal behavior in children, appearance, and lying. Various methods and measurement techniques for assessing eye gaze, body motion, facial actions, vocal signals, and multichannel events.

Topic 2: Interaction Analysis. Common methods of discourse and interaction analysis; methodological arguments and theoretical questions often asked of message analysts.

Topic 3: Analysis of Videotaped Interaction. The production and analysis of videotaped interaction in ethnographic research.

Topic 4: Conversation Analysis. Message description of naturally occurring interaction: transcription, analytic induction, field methods.

386R. Issues in Relational Communication. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Communication Studies 386R and Speech 386R may not both be counted unless the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Some sections also require consent of instructor or the graduate adviser; these are identified in the Course Schedule.

Topic 1: Communication in Relationships. Theories of development and change; research methods; relationship types; gender and roles; emotion; self-disclosure; secrets; lying; compliments; conflict; complaints; persuasion; dissolution processes; rejuvenating, repairing, and maintaining relationships.

Topic 2: Family Communication. Communication and attraction, courtship, marriage, the role of children in the marital relationship, sibling relationships, the effect of spouses' occupations on the family, and dysfunctional families.

386S. Communication, Cognition, and Emotion. The cognitive elements involved in social interaction, such as memory, comprehension, plans, decision making, and schemas. Communication Studies 386S and Speech 386S may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Some sections also require consent of instructor or the graduate adviser; these are identified in the Course Schedule.

090F. Research Internship. Participation in faculty-supervised research during the second full year of doctoral study. The equivalent of one lecture hour a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and eighteen semester hours of graduate credit at the doctoral level.

390J. Seminar in Philosophy and Rhetoric. Topics in rhetorical theory, including such areas as philosophy of argument, rhetoric and epistemology, and ethics of rhetoric. Communication Studies 390J and Speech 390J may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Some sections also require consent of instructor or the graduate adviser; these are identified in the Course Schedule.

390N. Political Discourse. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Communication Studies 390N and Speech 390N may not both be counted unless the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Some sections also require consent of instructor or the graduate adviser; these are identified in the Course Schedule.

Topic 1: Rhetoric and Political Theory. Survey of theoretical approaches to political discourse. Consideration of the ways the political penetrates public affairs, popular culture, high culture, and everyday social commerce.

Topic 2: Rhetoric of Social Movements. Philosophies, strategies, and effects of modern sociopolitical and religious movements designed to produce change.

390P. Rhetorical Theory. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Communication Studies 390P and Speech 390P may not both be counted unless the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Some sections also require consent of instructor or the graduate adviser; these are identified in the Course Schedule.

Topic 1: Contemporary Rhetorical Theory. Investigation of recent definitions, issues, and trends in rhetorical theory, with emphasis on the philosophical bases of rhetoric and the relationship of rhetoric to other disciplines.

Topic 2: Contemporary Critical Theory I. A survey of the leading schools of contemporary cultural and literary theory, such as neo-Marxism, postmodernism, and phenomenology, with special attention to their implications for rhetoric in particular and for academic work in general.

Topic 3: Contemporary Critical Theory II. The relationships among literary and rhetorical theory and literature, with special attention to the fiction and drama of Pirandello, Brecht, Beckett, Ibsen, Koestler, Camus, and Le Guin.

390R. Seminar in Rhetorical Criticism. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Communication Studies 390R and Speech 390R may not both be counted unless the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Some sections also require consent of instructor or the graduate adviser; these are identified in the Course Schedule.

Topic 1: Basic Rhetorical Criticism. Elementary methods of analyzing public discourse, including the ways and the reasons that rhetorical analysis is attempted.

Topic 2: Advanced Rhetorical Criticism. Survey of six popular schools of thought, including dramatism, Marxism, and structuralism, and their implications for textual analysis.

Topic 3: Feminist Theory and Rhetorical Criticism. In-depth consideration of the premises underlying American and European feminism and the effects of such premises on critical experience. Special attention to the ways contemporary texts become gendered.

Topic 4: Rhetoric and Popular Culture. Survey of the ways film, television, popular literature, and consumer culture influence our attitudes and values. Consideration of a wide variety of contemporary theorists as well as experience in analyzing contemporary textual artifacts.

Topic 5: Rhetoric and Literature. Survey of the major genres of popular fiction--melodrama, romance, mystery, science fiction, and adventure--with special attention to the sources and strategies of their rhetorical appeal for diverse audiences.

390S. Seminar in Organizational Communication. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Communication Studies 390S and Speech 390S may not both be counted unless the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Some sections also require consent of instructor or the graduate adviser; these are identified in the Course Schedule.

Topic 1: Narrative Communication in Organizations. Current theories of narrative and their applications to organizations. Topics include gossip, day-to-day news, and dramatic enactments of organizational communication.

Topic 2: Power and Politics in Organizational Communication. The communication implications of sociological and managerial approaches to the study of power and politics, with emphasis on ideas about structure, culture, ideology, information, conformity, voice, and dissent.

Topic 3: Communication and Organizational Change. A survey of theory and research on organizational life cycles, focusing on organizational renewal and on the management of change in organizations through transformational leadership.

Topic 4: Research Design in Organizational Communication. Topics include determining what to study, the design of field and laboratory research with multiple research methods, ways of bridging conceptualization and operationalization of variables, methods of data analysis, and the process of drawing inferences from data.

Topic 5: Communication in Selection and Recruitment Processes. Communication-related research and theory on selection interviewing and organizational recruitment practices.

390T. Organizational Communication Theory. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Communication Studies 390T and Speech 390T may not both be counted unless the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Some sections also require consent of instructor or the graduate adviser; these are identified in the Course Schedule.

Topic 1: Organizational Communication: Micro. A survey of research and theory in organizational communication, with emphasis on communication as an assimilating and role-defining experience.

Topic 2: Organizational Communication: Macro. An introduction to selected macro-level or systemic variables in organizations, such as structure, technology, and environments, and to the ways these variables relate to organizational communication processes.

Topic 3: Postmodern Organizational Communication Theory. An attempt to integrate the concern in cultural studies for structure with the stream of organizational theory that focuses on chaos. Readings include Clifford and Markus, Clifford, Deleuze and Guattari, March and Olsen, Weick.

390U. Consultation in Organizations. A review of social science literature and its application to problem solving and organizational development in field settings. Communication Studies 390U and Speech 390U may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Some sections also require consent of instructor or the graduate adviser; these are identified in the Course Schedule.

392P. Seminar in Communication Technology. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Communication Studies 392P and Speech 392P may not both be counted unless the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Some sections also require consent of instructor or the graduate adviser; these are identified in the Course Schedule.

Topic 1: Communication Technology and Behavior. Review of contemporary social and information science research into the adoption, implementation, regulation, and evaluation of communication technologies. Review of applications in topical areas of students' choice. Qualitative and quantitative research methods.

Topic 2: Research in Communication Technologies. Development of research skills through projects in the uses of communication technologies. Review of research methods and analysis strategies.

698. Thesis. The equivalent of three lecture hours a week for two semesters. Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Communication Studies 698A and Speech 698A may not both be counted; Communication Studies 698B and Speech 698B may not both be counted. Prerequisite: For 698A, graduate standing in communication studies and consent of the graduate adviser; for 698B, Communication Studies 698A (or Speech 698A).

398R. Master's Report. Preparation of a report to fulfill the requirement for the master's degree under the report option. The equivalent of three lecture hours a week for one semester. Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Communication Studies 398R and Speech 398R may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in communication studies and consent of the graduate adviser.

398T. Supervised Teaching in Communication Studies. Teaching communication studies under supervision. Offered on the letter-grade basis only. Communication Studies 398T and Speech 398T may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

399R, 699R, 999R. Dissertation. Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Prerequisite: Admission to candidacy for the doctoral degree.

399W, 699W, 999W. Dissertation. Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Prerequisite: Communication Studies 399R, 699R, or 999R (or Speech 399R, 699R, or 999R).

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Graduate Catalog | 2005-2007 Communication Studies program | courses

Fields of Study

    Office of the Registrar     University of Texas at Austin copyright 2005
    Official Publications 16 Aug 2005