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Appendix
of course abbreviations


Graduate Catalog | 2005-2007
College of Education

Kinesiology and Health Education

to courses in HED Health Education | KIN Kinesiology »
to program in Kinesiology and Health Education »
 

Graduate Courses

The faculty has approval to offer the following courses in the academic years 2005-2006 and 2006-2007; however, not all courses are taught each semester or summer session. Students should consult the Course Schedule to determine which courses and topics will be offered during a particular semester or summer session. The Course Schedule may also reflect changes made to the course inventory after the publication of this catalog.

Unless otherwise stated below, each course meets for three lecture hours a week for one semester.

HED | Health Education

386. Research Methodologies. Disciplines of research methods, research design, data-producing techniques, treatment and interpretation of data, reporting on research. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

Topic 1: Research Methods: Proposal Writing. Additional prerequisite: Educational Psychology 371 or an equivalent introductory statistics course with a grade of at least C.

Topic 2: Research Methods: Applied Research Techniques.

395. Advanced Topical Studies. Group and individual studies of advanced topics; critique and synthesis of research findings and of literature. The equivalent of three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

Topic 1: Foundations of Health Promotion.

Topic 3: Work Site Health Promotion.

Topic 4: Intervention Mapping: Health Promotion Program Development.

Topic 5: Issues in School and College Health.

Topic 6: Theories of Health Behavior.

Topic 7: Health Promotion/Disease Prevention: Epidemiological Approach.

Topic 8: Theories of Substance Abuse.

Topic 11: Human Sexuality.

Topic 12: Child and Adolescent Health Psychology.

Topic 16: Organizational and Social Change for Health Promotion.

Topic 17: Mind/Body Health. The scientific basis for mind/body health; overview of clinically tested mind/body interventions in each dimension of health: emotional, psychological, physical, spiritual, intellectual, and social.

Topic 18: Adolescent Problem Behaviors: A Developmental Perspective. In-depth theoretical and empirical analysis from a developmental perspective of adolescent problem behaviors. Individual and contextual factors related to adolescent substance abuse, early sexual activity, pregnancy and childbearing, and emotional problems.

Topic 19: Public Health Communication: Case Studies. Introduction to applications of social cognitive learning theory and innovation diffusion theory in the design of campaigns to change health behaviors.

Topic 20: Adult Development, Aging, and Health.

Topic 21: Risk and Resilience in Children and Adolescents. An introduction to the theories and methods of child and adolescent risk and resilience. Examines resilience processes in populations at elevated risk for negative outcomes and explores how the empirical research of the past two decades has contributed to the development of preventive intervention programs aimed at strengthening resilience in at-risk youth.

Topic 22: Politics of Health and Long-Term Care Reform.

Topic 23: Health Issues in Gerontology. An introduction to physical, psychological, and social perspectives on aging, with an emphasis on health and health care of older adults. Explores the impact of an aging society on socioeconomic, political, and health care systems.

Topic 24: Social and Behavioral Aspects of International Health. Behavioral science principles and methods of international cooperation in research and action, illustrated by case studies.

Topic 25: Politics and Policies in an Aging Population. The impact of an aging population on social institutions; the utility of different approaches to the social welfare demands of an ethnically and racially diverse population.

196, 396. Doctoral Seminar. Individual or shared project research with reports evaluated by seminar participants and the instructor. The equivalent of one or three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit. Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and written consent form.

396T. Directed Research in Health Education. Investigation of assigned problems under the direction of a Graduate Studies Committee member; development and demonstration of competence in research design and execution; production of an acceptably written research report. The equivalent of three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and written consent form.

197, 397. Research Problems. Individual or group research in a specialized area of health education. The equivalent of one or three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and written consent form.

397P, 697P. Graduate Internship. Supervised practice in a professional organization or institution. The equivalent of nine or eighteen laboratory hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit by doctoral students. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and admission by internship committee.

698. Thesis. The equivalent of three lecture hours a week for two semesters. Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Prerequisite: For 698A, graduate standing in health education and written consent of the graduate adviser; for 698B, Health Education 698A and written consent of the graduate adviser.

399R, 699R, 999R. Dissertation. Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Prerequisite: Admission to candidacy for the doctoral degree and written consent form.

399W, 699W, 999W. Dissertation. Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Prerequisite: Health Education 399R, 699R, or 999R; and written consent form.

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KIN | Kinesiology

382. Conference-Laboratory. Laboratory or workshop-type instruction dealing with selected problems in specialization areas of kinesiology. Conference course. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Only one of the following may be counted unless the topics vary: Kinesiology 182, 382, Physical Education 382. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

Topic 4: Biomechanics Laboratory. Additional prerequisite: Kinesiology 395 (Topic 36: Biomechanics of Human Movement), two semesters of calculus, and one semester of college physics (mechanics); or consent of instructor.

Topic 6: Advanced Laboratory Techniques in Exercise Physiology. Knowledge and skills needed to assess the metabolic characteristics of the rat, to evaluate the metabolic characteristics of skeletal muscle, and to perform essential biochemical assays and procedures that are typically used in biochemical and molecular biology experiments. Additional prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Topic 7: Clinical Exercise Physiology: Theory and Practice. Designed for students interested in assessing physical fitness and well-being and designing exercise programs in corporate, community, clinical, occupational, and commercial settings. Students receive practical experience assessing physical fitness. Additional prerequisite: Kinesiology 325K or the equivalent.

Topic 8: Laboratory Techniques in Sport Sciences. The theory and practice of modern laboratory and field techniques used to evaluate human physical performance and physiological function. Additional prerequisite: Kinesiology 325K or consent of instructor.

Topic 9: Motor Development: Assessment. Review of screening, diagnostic, or programmatic motor assessment instruments. Includes test psychometrics, test content, appropriate population, and comparable or competing assessments. Additional prerequisite: Kinesiology 321M or the equivalent, Kinesiology 395 (Topic 45: Seminar in Motor Development), or consent of instructor.

382T. Principles of Neuroscience: Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience. A proseminar covering the core material on essential topics in neuroscience from the molecular to the systems level. Only one of the following may be counted: Biology 381C, Kinesiology 382T, Neuroscience 382T, Pharmacy 382T, Psychology 382T, Zoology 382T. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, consent of instructor, and concurrent enrollment in Neuroscience 185.

383T. Principles of Neuroscience: Systems and Behavioral Neuroscience. A proseminar covering the core material on essential topics in neuroscience from the molecular to the systems level. Only one of the following may be counted: Biology 381D, Kinesiology 383T, Neuroscience 383T, Pharmacy 383T, Psychology 383T, Zoology 383T. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, consent of instructor, and concurrent enrollment in Neuroscience 186.

386. Research Methodologies. Disciplines of research methods, research design, data-producing techniques, treatment and interpretation of data, reporting on research. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

Topic 1: Research Methods: Proposal Writing. Required of all candidates for the master's degree in kinesiology with thesis or report. Additional prerequisite: Educational Psychology 371 or an equivalent introductory statistics course with a grade of at least C.

Topic 2: Research Methods: Applied Research Techniques.

395. Advanced Topical Studies. Graduate seminar in topics related to specialization areas. Additional hours may be required for some topics; these topics are identified in the Course Schedule. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing; additional prerequisites vary with the topic and are given in the Course Schedule.

Topic 1: Ergogenic Aids for Exercise. Additional prerequisite: Kinesiology 325K or consent of instructor.

Topic 2: Cardiac Metabolism. Additional prerequisite: Kinesiology 395 (Topic 46), and Chemistry 339 or consent of instructor.

Topic 3: Physiology of Aging. Additional prerequisite: Kinesiology 395 (Topic 46).

Topic 4: Biomechanics of Sport. Additional prerequisite: Kinesiology 324K and 326K.

Topic 5: Exercise and Preventive Medicine. Additional prerequisite: Kinesiology 325K.

Topic 8: Motor Control: Neuromuscular Bases. Additional prerequisite: Kinesiology 336 or consent of instructor.

Topic 9: Motor Control: Performance and Learning. Additional prerequisite: Kinesiology 315 (or 335) or consent of instructor.

Topic 10: Neural Control of Posture and Locomotion. Additional prerequisite: Kinesiology 336 or consent of instructor.

Topic 12: Muscle Physiology and Plasticity. Additional prerequisite: Kinesiology 395 (Topic 46) or consent of instructor.

Topic 13: Aging Motor Systems.

Topic 15: Conditioning for Competitive Athletes. Additional prerequisite: Kinesiology 325K or consent of instructor.

Topic 16: Cardiovascular Response to Exercise. Additional prerequisite: Kinesiology 325K or consent of instructor.

Topic 18: Fitness Testing and Evaluation.

Topic 21: Children's Exercise and Activity. Physiological bases for changes in exercise and sports performance and in exercise capacity throughout childhood and adolescence. Includes aspects of cardiovascular, respiratory, and metabolic changes and issues related to thermoregulation, training, gender, and health and fitness. Additional prerequisite: Kinesiology 321M and 325K, or consent of instructor.

Topic 23: Critical Issues and Events in American Sport.

Topic 25: Fat Metabolism during Exercise. Additional prerequisite: Kinesiology 395 (Topic 46), or 325K and consent of instructor.

Topic 26: Legal Issues in Sport.

Topic 27: Athletics Administration.

Topic 28: Physical Dimensions of Aging.

Topic 29: Ethics in Sport.

Topic 32: Sport Marketing. Additional prerequisite: An introductory undergraduate or graduate survey course in marketing.

Topic 33: Musculoskeletal Biomechanics. Synthesis of properties of the musculotendon and skeletal systems to construct detailed computer models that quantify human performance and muscular coordination. Additional prerequisite for kinesiology students: Mathematics 341 (or 311), Kinesiology 395 (Topic 36), and consent of instructor.

Topic 36: Biomechanics of Human Movement. Same as Biomedical Engineering 383J (Topic 4: Biomechanics of Human Movement). Additional prerequisite: Kinesiology 326K, two semesters of calculus, one semester of college physics (mechanics), and consent of instructor.

Topic 38: Carbohydrate Metabolism during Exercise.

Topic 42: Facility Management. Management and operation of sport, recreation, convocation, convention, and other public assembly facilities.

Topic 43: Exercise and Mental Health. The benefits of exercise in moderating negative psychological states such as anxiety, stress reactivity, and depression. Additional prerequisite: Kinesiology 325K.

Topic 44: Sport Finance. Designed to reinforce students' understanding of finance and its role in sport and health promotion programs, and to provide students with the knowledge and skills needed in the administration of sport and health promotion programs.

Topic 45: Pediatric Motor Development. Additional prerequisite: Kinesiology 321M or consent of instructor; Kinesiology 336 is recommended.

Topic 46: Advanced Exercise Physiology I. Designed to provide students with the essential graduate background for the application and practice of exercise physiology. The integration of the nervous, skeletal muscle, and cardiovascular systems from the subcellular level to the whole-organism level. Additional prerequisite: Kinesiology 325K.

Topic 47: Advanced Exercise Physiology II. The physiological and metabolic response to exercise, with emphasis on integrating the whole-body and cellular responses. In a variety of topics, students review basic physiology, focus on responses during exercise, and apply their findings to situations in the clinical and sporting environments. Additional prerequisite: Kinesiology 395 (Topic 46).

Topic 48: Social Psychology of Sport and Physical Activity. The theoretical structure that underlies social psychology as it has been applied to sport. Emphasis on the psychological concerns that confront coaches in their interactions with individual athletes and teams. Additional prerequisite: Kinesiology 311K or consent of instructor.

Topic 49: Sports Nutrition. The nutritional needs of people whose physical activity ranges from recreational to elite competitive athletics. Development of practical dietary strategies that recognize the unique nature of sport and the role of diet in promoting optimal physiological adaptation to training. Three lecture hours and one and one-half discussion hours a week for one semester. Additional prerequisite: Kinesiology 325K or consent of instructor.

Topic 50: Sport Psychology. The general field of experimental sport psychology, with emphasis on the psychological components of individual performance. Designed to prepare students to discuss the important questions, methodology, and experimental literature in selected areas of sport psychology. Additional prerequisite: Kinesiology 311K or consent of instructor.

Topic 51: Adult Development, Aging, and Health.

Topic 52: Organizational Behavior in Sport. Determinants and consequences of individual motivation and attitudes in organizations generally and in sport organizations specifically. Theory related to the individual often responsible for motivating people toward organizational goals, the leader. Additional prerequisite: For students in the College of Education, Management 320F or the equivalent; for others, Management 320F or the equivalent, and consent of instructor.

Topic 53: Sport Public Relations and Sales. Detailed study of the relationship between the media, corporate sponsorship, and sport. Focus on various media techniques utilized by sport managers and sport sponsorship basics. Additional prerequisite: Kinesiology 395 (Topic 32) or the equivalent or consent of instructor.

Topic 54: The Biology of Aging.

Topic 55: Assessment of Physical Function in Older Adults. Introduction to the goals, issues, and procedures that relate to the clinical assessment of physical function in the elderly (sixty-five and older).

Topic 56: Sport and Special Event Management. Introduction to key considerations when planning, implementing, and evaluating an event. Considers the organization of the events industry worldwide and examines how events link to other sectors of the economy. Specialized skills for the management and marketing of events. Students have the opportunity for hands-on practice in the use of the necessary tools for planning, programming, administering, and evaluating an event.

Topic 57: Strategic Management for Sport Organizations. The strategic management process and the problems and possibilities encountered when assessing, formulating, implementing, and evaluating an organization's strategic effort. Students analyze case studies and simulate running a sport business, setting corporate strategies while applying strategic concepts and techniques within a practical decision-making framework. Additional prerequisite: Kinesiology 395 (Topic 32) or 395 (Topic 44) or 395 (Topic 52) or consent of instructor.

Topic 58: Sport Consumer Behavior. An examination of contemporary theory and research on the subject of sport consumer behavior.

Topic 59: Biomechanics in Clinical Settings. Designed to provide students with the basic biomechanical competence required to understand how normal human movements are generated, how movements are altered by injury or pathology, and how clinical intervention can improve performance. Additional prerequisite: Kinesiology 324K and 326K, or the equivalent.

Topic 60: Sport Policy. The formulation and analysis of sport policies: the uses of policy analysis in sport settings; environmental, economic, and sociopolitical impacts of sport, including policy implications.

Topic 61: Central Questions in Biomechanics and Motor Control. Designed to allow students to explore specific topics of current interest in biomechanics and/or motor control; to learn to evaluate the scientific literature in areas of current debate or controversy; and to develop scientifically sound, relevant, and experimentally testable research hypotheses. Additional prerequisite: Kinesiology 382 (Topic 4: Biomechanics Laboratory), and Kinesiology 395 (Topic 36) or written consent of instructor.

Topic 62: Aging and Cardiovascular Function and Disease Risks. Cardiovascular changes associated with aging; scientific issues and hypotheses in the area of aging and cardiovascular function and disease risks; and presenting critical analyses of these issues. Additional prerequisite: An upper-division course in human or vertebrate physiology.

Topic 63: Introduction to Nonlinear Dynamics in Biological Systems. Same as Biomedical Engineering 383J (Topic 5: Introduction to Nonlinear Dynamics in Biological Systems). Basic concepts of nonlinear mathematics and their application to biological systems. Additional prerequisite: Two semesters of college-level calculus and consent of instructor.

Topic 64: Neuromuscular Aspects of Fatigue and Training. The role of the central nervous system during muscular fatigue and exercise training. Additional prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

196, 396. Doctoral Seminar. Individual or shared project research, reports evaluated by seminar participants and the instructor. The equivalent of one or three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and written consent form.

296T, 396T. Directed Research. Investigation of assigned problems under direction of a Graduate Studies Committee member; development and demonstration of competence in research design and execution; production of an acceptably written research report. Conference course. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and written consent form.

197, 397. Research Problems. Individual or group research topics in a specialization area of kinesiology. One or three conference or lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and written consent form. Some sections also require consent of instructor; these are identified in the Course Schedule.

197P, 397P, 697P. Graduate Internship. Supervised practice in a professional organization, business, or institution. The equivalent of three, nine, or eighteen laboratory hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, a University grade point average of at least 3.00 and a grade point average in the major department of at least 3.00, and written consent form.

698. Thesis. The equivalent of three lecture hours a week for two semesters. Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Prerequisite: For 698A, graduate standing in kinesiology and written consent of the graduate adviser; for 698B, Kinesiology 698A and written consent of the graduate adviser.

398R. Master's Report. Preparation of a report to fulfill the requirement for the master's degree under the report option. The equivalent of three lecture hours a week for one semester. Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in kinesiology and written consent of the graduate adviser.

399R, 699R, 999R. Dissertation. Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Prerequisite: Admission to candidacy for the doctoral degree and written consent form.

399W, 699W, 999W. Dissertation. Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Prerequisite: Kinesiology 399R, 699R, or 999R; and written consent form.

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Graduate Catalog | 2005-2007 Kinesiology and Health Education program | courses

Fields of Study

    Office of the Registrar     University of Texas at Austin copyright 2005
    Official Publications 16 Aug 2005