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Appendix
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Graduate Catalog | 2005-2007
College of Education

Special Education

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Graduate Courses

The faculty has approval to offer the following courses in the academic years 2005-2006 and 2006-2007; however, not all courses are taught each semester or summer session. Students should consult the Course Schedule to determine which courses and topics will be offered during a particular semester or summer session. The Course Schedule may also reflect changes made to the course inventory after the publication of this catalog.

Unless otherwise stated below, each course meets for three lecture hours a week for one semester.

SED | Special Education

380. Multicultural Special Education. Study of critical issues in culture, language, and disability. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Special Education 380 and 393 may not both be counted unless the topics vary; Special Education 380 and 395 may not both be counted unless the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing; twelve semester hours of upper-division coursework in education, psychology, sociology, or other behavioral sciences; and consent of instructor. Additional prerequisites vary with the topic and are given in the Course Schedule.

Topic 1: Language Acquisition and Assessment in Multicultural Special Education. Language acquisition among culturally and linguistically diverse learners in general and special education, with emphasis on effective assessment and instruction.

Topic 4: Assessment in Multicultural Special Education. Cultural and linguistic factors related to the assessment of language-minority students; the best practices in psychoeducational procedures.

Topic 6: Advanced Research Topics in Multicultural Special Education. Current and emerging research on individuals with disabilities who are from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds. Provides students with opportunities to review research literature on topics of interest to them, and to explore their writing skills. A process approach to writing is used to familiarize students with the APA guidelines for preparing scholarly manuscripts.

Topic 7: Cross-Cultural Interactions in Multicultural Special Education. Introduction to principles of intercultural communication for educators. Emphasis on strategies for effective cross-cultural communication in a variety of educational settings, including general and special education.

Topic 8: School-Community Relations in Multicultural Special Education. Traditional methods of parent and school relations; emerging and innovative models for communication between the school and the community; the intent of the course is to explore school-community interactions in the context of the dynamics of culture, race, language, politics, history, economics, and religion.

Topic 9: Developing Personnel Preparation Programs in Multicultural Special Education. Designed to prepare students who plan to become faculty members at multifaceted institutions of higher education. Specific emphasis on issues that confront minority educators.

Topic 10: Cultural and Linguistic Diversity in Special Education and Rehabilitation Counselor Education. An overview of issues, problems, and emerging practices related to culturally and linguistically diverse students served in special education.

Topic 11: Educational Planning for Multicultural Special Education.

Topic 12: Educational Leadership in Multicultural Special Education.

Topic 13: Sociocultural Foundations of Special Education.

Topic 14: Cultural and Linguistic Diversity in Special Education and Rehabilitation Counselor Education. An overview of issues, problems, and emerging practices related to culturally and linguistically diverse students served in special education. Web-based instruction. No class meetings.

383. Learning Disabilities. Nature and concomitant results of minimal brain damage as it affects the characteristics and learning behavior of children; assessment and appraisal instruments; activities and materials for stimulation of learning. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing; twelve semester hours of upper-division coursework in education, psychology, or other behavioral sciences, including a course in special education; and consent of instructor. Additional prerequisites vary with the topic and are given in the Course Schedule.

Topic 1: Introduction to Learning Disabilities. Basic terms and definitions, the nature of specific learning disorders, theoretical models, and empirical classification systems.

Topic 6: Teaching Students with Dyslexia and Reading Difficulties. Theories and practices associated with dyslexia; terminology, assessment, and remedial strategies are emphasized.

Topic 7: Assessment in Special Education. The basic concepts related to the assessment of exceptional individuals.

Topic 8: Instructional Adaptations I. Design, implementation, and evaluation of instruction for elementary- and secondary-level students with mild to moderate disabilities who receive special education services. Special Education 383 (Topic 8) and 393 (Topic 15: Instructional Adaptations I) may not both be counted.

Topic 9: Instructional Adaptations II. Issues in the education of students with mild to moderate disabilities, including assessing students, evaluating instruction and instructional materials, and adapting and implementing instruction. Special Education 383 (Topic 9) and 393 (Topic 16: Instructional Adaptations II) may not both be counted.

384. Early Childhood Special Education. Education variables related to educational services and research for young children are investigated in terms of etiology, assessment, curriculum models, educational settings, and interdisciplinary programming. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing; twelve semester hours of upper-division coursework in education, psychology, or other behavioral sciences, including a course in special education; and consent of instructor. Additional prerequisites vary with the topic and are given in the Course Schedule.

Topic 1: Overview of Early Childhood Special Education. The educational and emotional needs of young disabled children (birth to six) and the techniques for implementing a "whole child" educational approach to meet the needs of the child and the family.

Topic 2: Current Research in Early Childhood Special Education. Latest ECSED research and theory as related to past, present, and anticipated trends. Emphasis is on writing a program, research proposal, or publishable article. May be repeated for credit.

Topic 3: Parent Education Models. The grief stages of parents; parent involvement models available to promote optimum parent-child and parent-professional relationships.

Topic 4: Introductory Practicum in Early Childhood Special Education. Teaching experience with disabled children in a center setting. Assessment and curriculum procedures are applied in developing an appropriate education for an individual child or small groups of children.

Topic 5: Advanced Practicum in Early Childhood Special Education. Teaching experience with a large group of children in a center setting. Program management and evaluation procedures are applied to a total curriculum, so that the student assumes a lead teacher and/or consultant role during training.

Topic 6: Assessment and Programming of Early Childhood Special Education. Experience in assessing a disabled child in a naturalistic setting. Formal and informal assessment procedures for children from birth through age six.

Topic 7: Medical/Educational Overview: Birth to Age Three. Overview of hospital-to-school early intervention techniques for meeting the medical and educational needs of preterm, low-birth-weight, and at-risk children and their parents.

Topic 8: Medical/Educational Parent Education and Involvement: Birth to Age Three. Research, design, and implementation of a functional child-parent program. Students develop their own programs for working with parents of children with specific problems or disabilities.

Topic 9: Medical/Educational Assessment: Birth to Age Three. Experience planning, assessing, and implementing educational programs for at-risk infants and toddlers. Emphasis is on interagency coordination and the use of the transdisciplinary team to meet the family's and the child's needs with a minimum of personnel.

Topic 10: Medical/Educational Programming: Birth to Age Three. Medical information on pre-, peri-, and postnatal effects of medical problems and extended hospital stays. Impact of medical intervention on the infant's and the family's development.

Topic 11: Medical/Educational Practicum in Early Childhood Special Education. Early intervention in a neonatal intensive care unit or on a follow-up team for medically fragile high-risk children.

Topic 12: Overview of Early Childhood Special Education. The educational and emotional needs of young disabled children (birth to six) and the techniques for implementing a "whole child" educational approach to meet the needs of the child and the family. Web-based instruction. No class meetings.

Topic 13: Early Language Intervention. Web-based instruction. No class meetings.

Topic 14: Family Support and Intervention. Web-based instruction. No class meetings.

Topic 15: Assessment and Programming of Early Childhood Special Education. Experience in assessing a disabled child in a naturalistic setting. Formal and informal assessment procedures for children from birth through age six. Web-based instruction. No class meetings.

Topic 16: Medical and Educational Assessment and Intervention. Web-based instruction. No class meetings.

Topic 17: Functional Motor and Vision Assessment and Intervention. Web-based instruction. No class meetings.

386. Behavioral Disorders. Discussion of behavioral disorders, contributory factors; psychological and educational diagnoses applied to educational programming. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing; twelve semester hours of upper-division coursework in education, psychology, or other behavioral sciences, including a course in special education; and consent of instructor. Additional prerequisites vary with the topic and are given in the Course Schedule.

Topic 10: Introduction to Behavioral Disorders. Introduction to the nature and needs of children with behavior disorders and to effective management methods and teaching strategies. The admission, review, and dismissal process is described and practiced so that students can work as members of an interdisciplinary team.

Topic 11: Foundations of Positive Behavioral Support and Classroom Management.

Topic 12: Designing Effective Systems of Behavioral Support in Schools.

Topic 13: Educating Students with Significant Behavioral Support Needs.

387. Rehabilitation Counseling. Study of rehabilitation counseling: basic orientation, process and procedures; related biomedical, psychological, and community aspects; specialized programs and field experiences. Three lecture hours a week for one semester; or meetings as required by the topic. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing; twelve semester hours of upper-division coursework in education, psychology, sociology, or other behavioral sciences; and consent of instructor. Additional prerequisites vary with the topic and are given in the Course Schedule.

Topic 1: Introduction to Rehabilitation Counseling. Orientation to rehabilitation; historical developments, philosophy, disability, legal basis, organizational structure, facilities, and related professions. Field visitations.

Topic 2: Adjustment to Disabling Conditions and Illness. Psychodynamic principles of adjustment to disability, individual perception of illness, and motivation for recovery; including somatopsychological and psychosomatic aspects.

Topic 3: Medical/Paramedical Aspects of Rehabilitation Counseling. Contributions of the medical profession; terminology, etiology, prognosis, therapeutic services, restorative techniques, assessment of limitations and capacities in typical disabilities.

Topic 4: Rehabilitation Counseling Process and Procedures. Systematic study of the rehabilitation counseling process, including required basic counselor skills, techniques, services, community resources, and professional ethics.

Topic 5: Prepracticum in Rehabilitation Counseling. Supervised, field-based observation and experience in rehabilitation counseling. Three lecture hours a week for one semester, with additional hours to be arranged.

Topic 6: Practicum in Rehabilitation Counseling. Individually supervised and systematically organized participation in rehabilitation counseling, case management, and professional skill development. Additional prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Topic 7: Specialized Problems in Rehabilitation Counseling. Intensive study of specialized problems related to specific disability groups, counseling methods, and concepts in vocational placement.

Topic 8: Supervised Clinical Practice in Rehabilitation Counseling. Supervised clinical experience in rehabilitation settings; integration of theory and practice through supervision of experience, seminars, and individual conferences.

Topic 9: Rehabilitation Counseling Theories. Current rehabilitation counseling theories with specific applications in rehabilitation settings. Current issues in rehabilitation counseling, case management, planning, and service delivery for specific disability groups.

Topic 11: Vocational Assessment and Job Placement. The application of career development and job placement concepts to people with disabilities. Occupational choice, vocational counseling, occupational aspects of disability, pertinent laws and regulations.

Topic 14: Group Counseling in Rehabilitation Counseling. Basic issues and key concepts of the group process. Analysis of the therapeutic process, stages of development, and practices.

Topic 15: Case Management in Rehabilitation Counseling. Management aspects of the rehabilitation counselor's job, including writing job descriptions; applying the selection and appraisal processes; applying civil rights laws that affect services to disabled persons; using the five functions of management; and working in a re-engineered environment.

Topic 16: Rehabilitation Counseling Theories. Web-based instruction. No class meetings.

Topic 17: Specialized Problems in Rehabilitation Counseling. Intensive study of specialized problems related to specific disability groups, counseling methods, and concepts in vocational placement. Web-based instruction. No class meetings.

Topic 18: Vocational Assessment and Job Placement. The application of career development and job placement concepts to people with disabilities. Occupational choice, vocational counseling, occupational aspects of disability, pertinent laws and regulations. Web-based instruction. No class meetings.

Topic 19: Introduction to Rehabilitation Counseling. Web-based instruction. No class meetings.

Topic 20: Adjustment to Disabling Conditions and Illness. Psychodynamic principles of adjustment to disability, individual perception of illness, and motivation for recovery; including somatopsychological and psychosomatic aspects. Web-based instruction. No class meetings.

Topic 21: Prepracticum in Rehabilitation Counseling. Supervised, field-based observation and experience in rehabilitation counseling. Web-based instruction. No class meetings.

Topic 22: Medical/Paramedical Aspects of Rehabilitation Counseling. Contributions of the medical profession; terminology, etiology, prognosis, therapeutic services, restorative techniques, assessment of limitations and capacities in typical disabilities. Web-based instruction. No class meetings.

Topic 23: Practicum in Rehabilitation Counseling. Individually supervised and systematically organized participation in rehabilitation counseling, case management, and professional skill development. Web-based instruction. No class meetings.

388. Autism and Developmental Disabilities. An intensive study of the psychological, sociological, physiological, and educational factors relating to the assessment, learning styles, and teaching of children with autism and other developmental disabilities. Includes affective, cognitive, and psychomotor development of the physically disabled and those with multiple developmental disabilities. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing; twelve semester hours of upper-division coursework in education, psychology, or other behavioral sciences, including a course in special education; and consent of instructor. Additional prerequisites vary with the topic and are given in the Course Schedule.

Topic 3: Teaching Individuals with Autism and Developmental Disabilities. Development of highly specialized skills needed to teach those with developmental disabilities. Emphasis is on the basic principles of learning that underlie effective instructional strategies and on ways to structure the environment to promote learning.

Topic 5: Enhancing Communication Potential in People with Autism and Developmental Disabilities. Communication intervention for those with developmental disabilities. Designed to help students learn to assess communication behavior and to create intervention programs that enhance existing communication skills and teach new skills. Hands-on experience with a variety of augmentative and alternative communication systems.

Topic 6: Educational Implications of Autism and Developmental Disabilities. Introduction to the learning and behavioral characteristics of those with developmental disabilities, including autism and related developmental disorders. Designed to give students an understanding of the educational needs of those with developmental disabilities and of ways to address those needs through special education and related services.

Topic 7: Challenging Behavior and Developmental Disabilities. The nature, assessment, and treatment of the challenging behaviors that are prevalent in individuals with developmental disabilities, such as aggression, self-injury, property destruction, tantrums, and stereotyped movements.

Topic 8: Research on Inclusion for Students with Autism and Developmental Disabilities. Literature relevant to the inclusion of students with developmental disabilities, including classic readings on the history and philosophy of inclusion; analysis of the evidence supporting current best-practice models. Emphasis on critical reading of empirical studies on the efficacy of inclusive education.

Topic 9: Assessment Research in Autism and Developmental Disabilities. Research related to the assessment of students with developmental disabilities, examined in the context of the theoretical orientations that underlie the major assessment strategies. Includes a review of studies related to the development and validation of contemporary assessment instruments and discussion of the scientific process involved in developing and validating assessment tools.

Topic 10: Advances in the Understanding and Treatment of Autism. Review of recent advances in the understanding and treatment of autism and related developmental disorders. The social forces that shape research and scientific understanding and the political forces that influence the delivery of education and related services, as well as implications for effective leadership in special education.

Topic 11: Intervention Research in Autism and Developmental Disabilities. How research is used to develop interventions for those with developmental disabilities. Students consider the role of basic research and theory in the development of interventions and the use of experimental design to demonstrate the effectiveness of an intervention program, explore the development of empirically validated intervention programs, and undertake qualitative and quantitative reviews of intervention research.

Topic 12: Challenging Behavior and Developmental Disabilities. The nature, assessment, and treatment of the challenging behaviors that are prevalent in individuals with severe and multiple disabilities such as aggression, self-injury, property destruction, tantrums, and stereotyped movements. Web-based instruction. No class meetings.

389. Special Education Administration. Study of the content and process of special education administration, including technological forecasting methods, case law as it applies to people with disabilities, management of problem employee styles, and related topics. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing; twelve semester hours of upper-division coursework in education, psychology, or other behavioral sciences, including a course in special education; and consent of instructor.

Topic 1: Administration of Special Education Programs. Application of principles of administration and leadership to problems associated with special education and instruction for special populations.

Topic 2: Educational Futures. Students are directed toward career goals: affective change toward the future and change processes; acquisition of knowledge about several technological forecasting methods and of skill in the use of one method.

Topic 3: Special Education Administration Seminar: Current Issues in Special Education.

Topic 4: Law and Disabilities. An examination of case law that covers definitions, equal educational opportunity, employment, accessibility, freedom of choice, freedom from residential confinement, housing and zoning restrictions, equal access to medical services, procreation, marriage, children, contracts, ownership and transfer of property, voting, and holding public office.

Topic 5: Special Populations. Leadership issues associated with serving school-age children through federal and state "title" programs, including English as a second language, bilingual education, and Chapters I and II. Also covered are alternative schools; programs for juvenile offenders, pregnant students and young mothers, and at-risk students such as those who have potential for suicide; and services for the homeless, the abused, and chemical abusers. Students read the significant literature and develop knowledge and skill in planning and designing delivery models.

393. Graduate Seminar in Special Education. Discussion of critical issues; critiques of literature; development of theories and models regarding disabling conditions. The equivalent of three class hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Special Education 380 and 393 may not both be counted unless the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing; twelve semester hours of upper-division coursework in education, psychology, or other behavioral sciences; and consent of instructor.

Topic 5: Applied Research in Special Education and Rehabilitation Counseling.

Topic 13: Issues in Special Education. Issues and challenges affecting decision-making and practices by special education teachers, general education teachers, assessment personnel, and school administrators in the treatment and education of students with disabilities. The primary goal is to advance students' understanding of the contributions of history, legislation, policy, research, practice, and recent trends as they apply to the resolution of major issues in special education and programs for students with disabilities.

Topic 17: Instructional Designs Using Assistive Technology. The design of instruction for students with disabilities by using assistive and instructional technologies.

Topic 18: Collaboration. Strategies such as collaborative consultation and teamwork models, which are used to improve learning outcomes for students with diverse learning needs.

Topic 19: Applied Research in Special Education and Rehabilitation Counseling. Web-based instruction. No class meetings.

394, 694. Practicum in Special Education. Supervised field placement in specialized settings serving exceptional children and youth. Conference course. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

395. Independent Study. Individual research planned, executed, and reported under supervision. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Special Education 380 and 395 may not both be counted unless the topics vary. Prerequisite: Admission to an approved program of graduate study or to candidacy for the doctoral degree in education, or graduate standing and consent of instructor. Additional prerequisites vary with the topic and are given in the Course Schedule.

Topic 1: Independent Study in Special Education Administration.

Topic 2: Independent Study in Behavioral Disorders.

Topic 4: Independent Study in Learning Disabilities.

Topic 6: Independent Study in Rehabilitation Counseling.

Topic 7: Independent Study in Early Childhood Special Education.

Topic 8: Independent Study in Autism and Developmental Disabilities.

Topic 15: Independent Study in Multicultural Special Education.

395D. Doctoral Seminar in Special Education and Rehabilitation Counselor Education. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Admission to an approved program of graduate study or to candidacy for the doctoral degree in education, and consent of instructor. Additional prerequisites vary with the topic and are given in the Course Schedule.

Topic 1: Special Education Administration.

Topic 2: Behavioral Disorders.

Topic 3: Learning Disabilities.

Topic 4: Rehabilitation Counseling.

Topic 5: Early Childhood Special Education.

Topic 6: Autism and Developmental Disabilities.

Topic 7: Multicultural Special Education.

695S. Professional Seminar. Forum for students to become familiar with the areas of study, research, and professional practice within special education. Students also refine their professional writing and communication skills, critically evaluate current and emerging research in the field, and examine the historical, legal, philosophical, and theoretical foundations of special education. Three lecture hours a week for two semesters. Required of all doctoral students. Prerequisite: For 695SA, graduate standing and admission to the doctoral program in special education; for 695SB, Special Education 695SA.

696. Research Mentoring. Designed to develop the knowledge and skills students need in order to conduct research. Under the supervision of a three-member committee, students develop a publishable-quality synthesis of the professional literature on a topic related to their research interests. Conference course. Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Required of all doctoral students prior to admission to candidacy. Prerequisite: For Special Education 696A, graduate standing, completion of specialization core requirements, at least three graduate courses in research methods and data analysis, and consent of the graduate adviser; for Special Education 696B, 696A.

396C. Trends and Issues in Special Education and Rehabilitation Counseling. An examination of current trends and issues in areas within special education and rehabilitation counselor education that influence policies and procedures in the public schools, teacher preparation programs, and community agencies. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing; twelve semester hours of upper-division coursework in education, psychology, sociology, or other behavioral sciences; and consent of instructor. Additional prerequisites vary with the topic and are given in the Course Schedule.

Topic 1: Trends and Issues in Early Childhood Special Education.

Topic 2: Trends and Issues in Learning Disabilities/Behavioral Disorders.

Topic 3: Trends and Issues in Multicultural Special Education.

Topic 4: Trends and Issues in Rehabilitation Counselor Education.

Topic 5: Trends and Issues in Special Education Administration.

Topic 7: Trends and Issues in Autism and Developmental Disabilities.

396R. Research Methods and Data Analysis. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, twelve semester hours of upper-division coursework in education, and consent of instructor.

Topic 1: Research Methodology in Special Education. Special Education 395 (Topic 9: Research Methodology in Special Education) and 396R (Topic 1) may not both be counted.

Topic 2: Single-Subject Research Design. The use of single-subject research designs to make data-based decisions about program effectiveness and student outcomes; integration of applied research into classroom instruction as part of evidence-based professional practice in educating students with severe and multiple disabilities.

Topic 3: Advanced Data Analysis in Special Education. Special Education 395T (Topic 10: Computer Data Analysis in Special Education) and 396R (Topic 3) may not both be counted.

396T. Directed Research in Special Education. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, twelve semester hours of upper-division coursework in education, and consent of instructor.

Topic 1: Directed Research in Special Education Administration.

Topic 2: Directed Research in Behavioral Disorders.

Topic 4: Directed Research in Learning Disabilities.

Topic 6: Directed Research in Rehabilitation Counseling.

Topic 7: Directed Research in Early Childhood Special Education.

Topic 8: Directed Research in Severe and Multiple Disabilities.

Topic 13: Directed Research in Multicultural Special Education.

397C. Advanced College Teaching. Supervised teaching experience at the college level. The equivalent of three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, admission to an approved program of graduate study or admission to candidacy for the doctoral degree in special education, Special Education 398T, and consent of the graduate adviser.

397P, 697P. Graduate Internship. Supervised practice in a professional position. The equivalent of three or six lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, twelve semester hours of upper-division coursework in education, and consent of instructor.

397S. Supervised Teaching in Special Education. Instruction in the supervision of student teachers and observers at the undergraduate level. Conference course. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, appointment as a teaching assistant and supervisor of undergraduate student teachers, and consent of instructor.

698. Thesis. The equivalent of three lecture hours a week for two semesters. Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Prerequisite: For 698A, graduate standing in special education and consent of the supervising professor and the graduate adviser; for 698B, Special Education 698A.

398R. Master's Report. Preparation of a report to fulfill the requirement for the master's degree under the report option. The equivalent of three lecture hours a week for one semester. Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in special education and consent of the graduate adviser.

398T. College Teaching in Special Education. Required for teaching assistants and assistant instructors. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

399R, 699R, 999R. Dissertation. Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Prerequisite: Admission to candidacy for the doctoral degree.

399W, 699W, 999W. Dissertation. Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Prerequisite: Special Education 399R, 699R, or 999R.

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Graduate Catalog | 2005-2007 Special Education program | courses

Fields of Study

    Office of the Registrar     University of Texas at Austin copyright 2005
    Official Publications 16 Aug 2005