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Appendix
of course abbreviations


Graduate Catalog | 2005-2007
College of Engineering

Materials Science and Engineering

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Graduate Courses

The faculty has approval to offer the following courses in the academic years 2005-2006 and 2006-2007; however, not all courses are taught each semester or summer session. Students should consult the Course Schedule to determine which courses and topics will be offered during a particular semester or summer session. The Course Schedule may also reflect changes made to the course inventory after the publication of this catalog.

Unless otherwise stated below, each course meets for three lecture hours a week for one semester.

MSE | Materials Science and Engineering

397. Graduate Seminar. Presentation of research topics by invited speakers, faculty, and students. Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

197R, 297R, 397R. Research. Individual research. May be repeated for credit. Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

698. Thesis. The equivalent of three lecture hours a week for two semesters. Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Prerequisite: For 698A, graduate standing in materials science and engineering and consent of the graduate adviser; for 698B, Materials Science and Engineering 698A.

398R. Master's Report. Preparation of a report to fulfill the requirement for the master's degree under the report option. The equivalent of three lecture hours a week for one semester. Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in materials science and engineering and consent of the graduate adviser.

399R, 699R, 999R. Dissertation. Research leading to the Doctor of Philosophy in materials science and engineering. Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Prerequisite: Admission to candidacy for the doctoral degree.

399W, 699W, 999W. Dissertation. Research leading to the Doctor of Philosophy in materials science and engineering. Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Prerequisite: Materials Science and Engineering 399R, 699R, or 999R.

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Related Courses

Aerospace Engineering

384P. Structural and Solid Mechanics.
Three lecture hours or two lecture hours and three laboratory hours a week for one semester, depending on the topic. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

Topic 11: Mechanics of Composite Materials.
Constitutive equations; micromechanical and macromechanical behavior of lamina; strength and stiffness in tension and compression, theory of laminated plates; strength of laminates; delamination.

Chemical Engineering

384, 684. Introduction to Research.
The equivalent of three or six class hours a week for one semester. Any number of topics may be taken for credit, and, with consent of instructor, any topic may be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in chemical engineering, or graduate standing and consent of instructor.

Topic 21: Kinetic Processes in Materials.
Examination of the connection between structure and various kinetic processes that occur in different classes of materials, metals, ionic crystals, inorganic glasses, and polymers. Discusses the kinetic theory of gases and Brownian dynamics.

386K. Theory of X-Ray Diffraction.
Application of basic diffraction theory to polycrystalline and single crystal materials. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

386L. Laboratory Experiments in X-Ray Diffraction.
Application of x-ray diffraction techniques to the examination of polycrystalline and single crystal materials. Two or three lecture hours and three or four laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

392. Polymer Science.
Details of polymerization mechanisms; structure-property relationships, fundamentals of processing, and characterization of high polymers. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

395C. Chemical Processes for Microelectronics.
Introduction to the chemical processes and the manufacturing operations used in microelectronics device fabrication. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

395E. Polymer Science and Engineering Laboratory.
Training in the preparation and instrumental characterization of polymers, blends, and compounds. Twelve laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

Chemistry

390K. Advanced Topics in Inorganic Chemistry.
Topics include magnetic resonance; organometallic, main-group, and transition metal chemistry; nonaqueous solvents; high-temperature superconductors; new developments in synthetic chemistry; and aspects of inorganic chemistry relevant to material science. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in chemistry, Chemistry 380L, and consent of instructor.

390L. Advanced Topics in Analytical Chemistry.
Topics include electrochemistry, electronics, mathematical methods, mass spectrometry, and optical methods. For most topics, three lecture hours a week for one semester; for topics on electronics and optical methods, two lecture hours and three laboratory hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

392N. Physical Chemistry of Macromolecular Systems.
Theory of macromolecular solutions and methods for characterization of macromolecular systems. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, and undergraduate physical chemistry or consent of instructor.

393L. Advanced Topics in Physical Chemistry.
Topics include magnetic resonance, electron scattering; quantum scattering in gases; chemical kinetics. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in chemistry, Chemistry 382M, and consent of instructor.

Electrical Engineering

396K. Solid-State Device Theory.
Theory of electron, magnetic, and electro-optic devices. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

Topic 1: Metal Oxide Semiconductor Devices: Physics and Technology.

Topic 2: Semiconductor Physics.
Introduction to the fundamental physics of charge carrier states in semiconductors, charge carrier interactions among themselves and with the environment, and charge transport in semiconductors and their heterostructures. Additional prerequisite: An introductory course in quantum mechanics.

Topic 4: Synthesis, Growth, and Analysis of Electronic Materials.

Topic 5: Superconducting Electronic Devices.

Topic 6: Magnetic Phenomena in Materials.

Topic 7: MOS Integrated Circuit Process Integration.

Topic 8: VLSI Fabrication Techniques.

Topic 9: Localized versus Itinerant Electrons in Solids.
Same as Mechanical Engineering 386R (Topic 1: Localized versus Itinerant Electrons in Solids). Description of electrons, from free atoms to crystals; band theory contrasted with crystal-field theory; evolution of electronic properties on passing from magnetic insulators to normal metals, from ionic to covalent solids, from single-valent compounds to mixed-valent systems; electron-lattice interactions and phase transitions; many examples. Additional prerequisite: A semester of quantum mechanics and a semester of solid-state science or technology.

Topic 10: Ionic Conductors.
Same as Mechanical Engineering 386T (Topic 1: Ionic Conductors).

Topic 11: High-Temperature Superconductors.
Same as Mechanical Engineering 386T (Topic 2: High-Temperature Superconductors).

Topic 12: Catalytic Electrodes.
Same as Mechanical Engineering 386T (Topic 3: Catalytic Electrodes).

Topic 13: Magnetic Materials.
Same as Mechanical Engineering 386T (Topic 4: Magnetic Materials).

Topic 14: Optical Interconnects.

Topic 15: Optoelectronics Integrated Circuits.

Topic 16: Semiconductor Lasers.

Topic 17: Localized-Electron Phenomena.
Same as Mechanical Engineering 386R (Topic 2: Localized-Electron Phenomena). Analysis of the variation in physical properties versus chemical composition of several groups of isostructural transition-metal compounds. Additional prerequisite: A semester of solid-state science and/or quantum mechanics.

Topic 19: Plasma Processing of Semiconductors I.
Plasma analysis using Boltzmann and fluid equations; plasma properties, including Debye length, quasineutrality, and sheaths; basic collisional properties, including Coulomb and polarization scattering; analysis of capacitive and wave-heated plasma processing reactors.

Topic 20: Plasma Processing of Semiconductors II.
Plasma chemistry and equilibrium; analysis of molecular collisions; chemical kinetics and surface processes; plasma discharge particle and energy balance; analysis of inductive and DC plasma processing reactors; plasma etching, deposition, and implantation.

Topic 21: Submicron Device Physics and Techniques.

Topic 22: Semiconductor Microlithography.

Topic 23: Semiconductor Heterostructures.

Topic 25: Organic and Polymer Semiconductor Devices.

Topic 27: Charge Transport in Organic Semiconductors.

396M. Quantum Electronics.
Quantum mechanical principles as applied to electron devices, lasers, and electro-optics; material properties and interaction of radiation and material. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in electrical engineering or physics, or graduate standing and consent of the graduate adviser.

Topic 1: Introductory Quantum Electronics.
Basic quantum mechanics and applications to solid-state phenomena and lasers.

Engineering Mechanics

380. Theory of Plasticity.
Physical basis of plastic deformation; mathematical theory of incremental plasticity; total theories; numerical implementation; slip and physical theories of plastic deformation; rate dependent (viscoplastic) models; applications to several engineering problems. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, and Engineering Mechanics 388 or the equivalent.

384K. Continuum Mechanics.
Foundations of the general nonlinear theories of continuum mechanics; general treatment of motion and deformation of continua, balance laws, constitutive theory; particular application to elastic solids and simple materials. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, and Engineering Mechanics 386K or consent of instructor.

388. Solid Mechanics I.
Same as Aerospace Engineering 384P (Topic 1: Solid Mechanics I). Mathematical description of stress, deformation, and constitutive equations of solid mechanics; boundary value problems of elasticity. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

388F. Fracture Mechanics.
Griffith theory of brittle crack propagation, other theories, crack toughness testing concepts. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, and Engineering Mechanics 388 or consent of instructor.

388L. Solid Mechanics II.
Same as Aerospace Engineering 384P (Topic 2: Solid Mechanics II). Continuation of Engineering Mechanics 388. Additional topics in elasticity, plasticity, viscoelasticity, variational methods, and other areas of solid mechanics. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, Engineering Mechanics 388, and consent of instructor.

388V. Theory of Viscoelasticity.
Introduction to linear viscoelasticity; methods of characterizing viscoelastic material behavior; analytical and approximate solution techniques for engineering problems, including contact, wave propagation, and thermoviscoelastic problems. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, and Engineering Mechanics 388 or consent of instructor.

389J. Experimental Mechanics.
Principles and techniques of measurement in mechanics; includes discussion of strain gauges, optical interference methods, photoelasticity, and dynamic measurements. Two lecture hours and three laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

Mechanical Engineering

386P. Materials Science: Fundamentals.
May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

Topic 1: Introduction to Phase Transformations.
Basics of crystal structures and phase diagrams; diffusion; solidification; solid-state phase transformations.

Topic 2: Mechanical Behavior of Materials.
Elastic deformation; viscoelasticity; yielding, plastic flow, plastic instability; strengthening mechanisms; fracture, fatigue, creep; significance of mechanical properties tests. Microstructural mechanisms and macroscopic behavior of metals, polymers, ceramics, and composites.

Topic 3: Introduction to Thermodynamics of Materials.
Thermodynamic properties; reactions and chemical equilibrium in gases; solutions, phase equilibria, phase diagrams, reaction equilibria; surfaces and interfaces; point defects in crystals.

Topic 4: Introduction to Solid-State Properties of Materials.
Introduction to the electronic, magnetic, and optical properties of materials. Solid-state properties of metals, semiconductors, and ceramics; fundamental concepts needed for the description of these properties, using an introductory-level description of the electronic structure of solids.

Topic 5: Structure of Materials.
Essential crystallography of lattices and structures; symmetry; elements of diffraction and reciprocal lattices; point, line, and surface defects in crystals; crystalline interfaces; noncrystalline materials; polymers; glasses.

386Q. Materials Science: Structure and Properties.
May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

Topic 1: Theory of Materials.
Periodic behavior and the periodic table; historical approach to the principles of crystal structure; complex alloy phases; some aspects of phase stability.

Topic 2: Phase Diagrams.
Phase equilibria in materials systems; systematic treatment of unary, binary, and ternary phase diagrams.

Topic 3: Fracture of Structural Materials.
Microscopic and macroscopic aspects of ductile and brittle fracture; fracture mechanisms and fracture prevention.

Topic 4: Physical Metallurgy of Steels.
The iron-carbon system; transformations and structures of steels; properties of pearlite, bainite, and martensite; tempering; hardenability and the effect of alloying elements.

Topic 7: Composite Materials.
The theory of structural composite materials, their physical and mechanical properties; processing associated with metal-ceramic-polymer composites. Additional prerequisite: Mechanical Engineering 260K (or 360K) or the equivalent, Mechanical Engineering 378K or the equivalent, or consent of instructor.

Topic 9: Crystalline and Composite Anisotropy.
Mathematical analysis of anisotropic materials, including single crystals, laminate composites, and deformation-hardened metals. Topics include thermal and electrical conductivity, diffusivity, thermal expansion, elasticity, and yielding.

Topic 10: High-Temperature Materials.
Theory and practice in use of materials for high-temperature structural applications; case-study considerations of actual problems and requirements; interactive process-microstructure-property relationships in materials development and applications of superalloys, intermetallics, composites, and ceramics; prospective trends.

Topic 11: Ceramic Engineering.
Bonding; crystal structures; defects; phase diagrams; glass ceramics; electrical, dielectric, magnetic, and optical ceramics. Mechanical Engineering 386Q (Topic 6: Ceramic Materials) and 386Q (Topic 11) may not both be counted.

Topic 13: Structural Ceramics.
Powder processing, powder characterization, forming techniques, densification, and development of microstructure; emphasis on understanding materials, selection, and microstructure-mechanical property relationships.

Topic 14: Electrochemical Materials.
Electrochemical cells; principles of electrochemical power sources; materials for batteries, fuel cells, electrochemical capacitors, electrochromic devices, and electrochemical sensors.

386R. Materials Science: Physical and Electronic Properties.
May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

Topic 1: Localized versus Itinerant Electrons in Solids.
Same as Electrical Engineering 396K (Topic 9: Localized versus Itinerant Electrons in Solids). Description of electrons, from free atoms to crystals; band theory contrasted with crystal-field theory; evolution of electronic properties on passing from magnetic insulators to normal metals, from ionic to covalent solids, from single-valent compounds to mixed-valent systems; electron-lattice interactions and phase transitions; many examples. Additional prerequisite: A semester of quantum mechanics and a semester of solid-state science or technology.

Topic 2: Localized-Electron Phenomena.
Same as Electrical Engineering 396K (Topic 17: Localized-Electron Phenomena). Analysis of the variation in physical properties versus chemical composition of several groups of isostructural transition-metal compounds. Additional prerequisite: A semester of solid-state science and/or quantum mechanics.

Topic 3: Transport Properties of Transition-Metal Oxides.
Electronic and ionic transport in transition-metal oxides as they relate to battery cathodes, solid oxide cells, spin electronics, thermistors, and high-temperature superconductors.

386S. Materials Science: Microelectronics and Thin Films. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

Topic 1: Thin Films and Interfaces.
Application of thin films and interfaces in microelectronics; basic properties, deposition techniques, microstructures and defects, diffusion characteristics; materials reaction in thin films and at interfaces.

Topic 2: Metallization and Packaging.
Technology requirements and trends, impact of device scaling, multilayered interconnect structures, Schottky and ohmic contacts, contact reactions, silicide properties and applications, electromigration, thermal/mechanical properties, reliability. Additional prerequisite: Mechanical Engineering 386S (Topic 1).

386T. Materials Science: The Design of Technical Materials. The process of designing a material for a specific engineering function as illustrated for various materials. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

Topic 1: Ionic Conductors.
Same as Electrical Engineering 396K (Topic 10: Ionic Conductors).

Topic 2: High-Temperature Superconductors.
Same as Electrical Engineering 396K (Topic 11: High-Temperature Superconductors).

Topic 3: Catalytic Electrodes.
Same as Electrical Engineering 396K (Topic 12: Catalytic Electrodes).

Topic 4: Magnetic Materials.
Same as Electrical Engineering 396K (Topic 13: Magnetic Materials).

387Q. Materials Science: Thermodynamics and Kinetics.
May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

Topic 1: Diffusion in Solids.
Atomic mechanisms and phenomenological basis for transport by diffusion.

Topic 2: Kinetics and Phase Transformations.
Nucleation and growth, spinodal decomposition, transformations in alloy systems.

Topic 3: Solidification.
Liquid to solid transformations in pure materials, alloys and eutectics; applications such as zone refining, composites, and castings.

Topic 4: Corrosion.
Electrode kinetics and the theory of polarization, passivity, galvanic coupling, and high temperature oxidation.

Topic 5: Thermodynamics of Materials.
First and second laws, fugacity, activity, chemical equilibrium, phase diagrams, and introductory statistical concepts.

Topic 6: Statistical Thermodynamics of Materials.
Quantum mechanics applied to partition functions of condensed and gaseous phases; chemical equilibria; phase transitions; and lattice statistics including the Ising model.

Topic 7: Group Theory and Phase Transformations.
Symmetry principles and the associated mathematics applied to the description of condensed phases and their transformations.

387R. Materials Science: Experimental Techniques.
Some topics may require additional laboratory hours; these are identified in the Course Schedule. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

Topic 1: Nondestructive Testing.
Acoustic emission, ultrasonic, eddy current, dye penetrant, and magnetic methods.

Topic 3: Electron Diffraction and Microscopy.
Transmission electron microscopy, kinematic electron diffraction theory, reciprocal lattice, defect analyses, scanning electron microscopy.

Topic 4: Advanced Electron Microscopy Theory and Techniques.
Scanning transmission electron microscopy, microanalysis techniques, dynamical diffraction theory, convergent beam diffraction.

Topic 5: Materials Characterization Techniques.
Classification and selection of characterization techniques: principles and applications of diffraction, spectroscopic, quantitative chemical analysis, thermal analysis, and transport and magnetic measurement techniques.

Topic 6: High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy Techniques.
Theory and practice of high-resolution phase contrast electron microscopy. Computer simulation of images and diffraction patterns.

Topic 7: Scanning Electron Microscopy.
Theory and practice of scanning electron microscopy; image formation, elemental analysis, sample preparation, and electron-sample interactions. Three lecture hours and two laboratory hours a week for one semester.

387S. Materials Processing.
May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

Topic 2: Processing of Materials.
Principles, advantages, and problems of solid, liquid, and vapor materials processes; considerations of structural alloys, ceramics, engineering polymers, and composites.

Physics

392K. Solid-State Physics. Lattice vibrations and thermal properties of solids; band theory of solids; transport properties of metals and semiconductors; optical properties; magnetic properties; magnetic relaxation; superconductivity. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, Physics 389K, and Physics 375S or the equivalent.

392L. Solid-State Physics. Elementary excitations: phonons, electrons, spin waves; interactions: phonon-phonon, electron-electron, electron-phonon; theory of metals and semiconductors; transport theory; optical properties. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and Physics 392K.

392T. Special Topics in Solid-State Physics. Topics to be announced. With consent of instructor, may be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, Physics 392K, and consent of instructor.

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Graduate Catalog | 2005-2007 Materials Science and Engineering program | courses

Fields of Study

    Office of the Registrar     University of Texas at Austin copyright 2005
    Official Publications 16 Aug 2005