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    Chapters

1

Graduate Study

2

Admission and Registration

3

Degree Requirements

4

Fields of Study

5

Members of Graduate Studies Committees


 


Appendix
of course abbreviations


Graduate Catalog | 2005-2007
College of Liberal Arts

Economics

to courses in ECO Economics »
 

Master of Arts
Master of Science in Economics
Doctor of Philosophy

Facilities for Graduate Work

In addition to the department resources described below, graduate students in economics may use the research facilities of the Teresa Lozano Long Institute of Latin American Studies, the Bureau of Business Research, the Population Research Center, and the Lyndon Baines Johnson Library and Museum, as well as those of the University Libraries and Information Technology Services. Also available in Austin are state government offices; regional offices of federal agencies, including the Internal Revenue Service; and the offices of several research institutions.

Computer facilities. In addition to a SPARCsystem 600 server and several SPARC workstations, the department has a computer laboratory equipped with twenty-five SPARCclassic X terminals and four multiprocessor servers running Solaris 2.5. These provide access to the X Window System, which allows users to run simultaneous applications on different hosts. Software available through each terminal and by remote access includes high-level programming languages, compilers, and debuggers for program development. Also installed are IMSL, LSSOL, and NPSOL libraries, several statistical and spreadsheet programs, and applications for symbolic mathematical manipulations, plotting, and word processing.

Center for Applied Research in Economics. The center maintains a local area network of Pentium Pro-based computers for empirical research by graduate students and faculty members. GAUSS, STATA, Mathematica, and word-processing and spreadsheet applications are installed, and the machines are available for student use at all times.

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Areas of Study

The Department of Economics offers graduate study and research in the core areas of microeconomics, macroeconomics, and econometrics and in a broad selection of applied areas. Current area offerings are listed in the department's graduate program brochure, available on request.

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Graduate Studies Committee

The following faculty members served on the Graduate Studies Committee in the spring semester 2004-2005.

Svetlana Boyarchenko
Stephen G. Bronars
Harry Cleaver
Russell W. Cooper
Philip Dean Corbae
Douglas C. Dacy
Peter Debaere
Alfredo Di Tillio
Stephen Donald
Richard Dusansky
Don Fullerton
Li Gan
Vincent J. Geraci
William P. Glade
Daniel S. Hamermesh
Takashi Hayashi
Kenneth Hendricks
Melvin J. Hinich
Yingyao Hu
Wolfgang Keller
David A. Kendrick
Burhanettin Kuruscu
Robert P. Lieli
Stephen P. Magee
Alfred L. Norman
Gerald S. Oettinger
Beatrix Paal
Kim J. Ruhl
Carol Shiue
David S. Sibley
Daniel T. Slesnick
Dale O. Stahl
Maxwell B. Stinchcombe
Stephen J. Trejo
Randal B. Watson
Andrew B. Whinston
Roberton C. Williams III
Paul W. Wilson
Thomas E. Wiseman
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Admission Requirements

Applicants should have completed at least twelve semester hours of upper-division coursework in economics, including three hours each in intermediate-level micro-economic and macroeconomic theory. The applicant should also have a firm grounding in differential and integral calculus, with an emphasis on proofs; matrix algebra; and probability theory. Exposure to advanced calculus, analysis, and topology is also desirable. A student may be admitted without meeting these requirements if he or she has other exceptionally strong qualifications; the student must then remedy deficiencies in undergraduate preparation, without graduate credit, during the first year in the program.

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Degree Requirements

Master of Arts

The Master of Arts degree program requires completion of thirty semester hours of coursework, including Economics 387L (Topic 1: Microeconomics I), 387L (Topic 2: Macroeconomics I), and 698. At least eighteen semester hours, including the thesis, must be in the major area, and at least six hours must be in supporting work. The program may include no more than nine hours of upper-division undergraduate work, no more than six hours of which may be in either the major or the supporting work. The student must take at least twenty-one semester hours in economics and either six or nine hours of approved coursework outside economics. He or she must earn separate grade point averages in economics and in the supporting work of at least 3.00.

Master of Science in Economics

This degree program requires completion of at least thirty-six semester hours of coursework, including Economics 387L (Topic 1: Microeconomics I), 387L (Topic 2: Macroeconomics I), and 392M (Topic 2: Econometrics I). At least eighteen semester hours must be in the major area, and at least six hours must be in supporting work. The program may include no more than nine hours of upper-division undergraduate work, no more than six hours of which may be in either the major or the supporting work. In addition to the required courses listed above, the student must complete two courses in one of the areas of study offered by the department; he or she must also take either two courses in a second area or Economics 392M (Topic 3: Econometrics II). No more than six hours of work may be taken on the credit/no credit basis; neither the required courses nor the courses in the two areas may be taken on this basis. The student must earn separate grade point averages in economics and in the supporting work of at least 3.00.

Doctor of Philosophy

The doctoral degree is based on satisfactory performance in courses, examinations, writing requirements, and completion of a dissertation. The student seeking admission to candidacy for the doctoral degree is required to take nine core courses: Economics 387L (Topic 1: Microeconomics I), 387L (Topic 2: Macroeconomics I), 387L (Topic 3: Microeconomics II), 387L (Topic 4: Macroeconomics II), 387L (Topic 24: Mathematical Economics), 392M (Topic 1: Probability and Statistics), 392M (Topic 2: Econometrics I), 392M (Topic 3: Econometrics II), and 392M (Topic 18: Econometrics III). Comprehensive examinations in microeconomics and macroeconomics are administered in June and August. In order to continue in the doctoral program, students must pass at least one comprehensive examination by the summer following their first year and both by the June examination date following their second year.

The student's program must include at least twenty-four semester hours of approved coursework taken in residence. In addition to the core courses, the student must complete two graduate courses in each of two elective fields of specialization. The elective fields are designed to prepare students to write a single-authored second-year paper to be submitted at the June examination date. A departmental graduate research committee evaluates the second-year paper, provides the student with written feedback for revision, and makes a final pass/fail decision by the August examination date. Students must receive a passing grade on the second-year paper to continue in the doctoral program. In the third year, students are required to take a writing seminar, Economics 387M, each semester in one of their fields, as well as two elective courses. By the beginning of the fourth year, the student is strongly advised to have formed a committee and planned chapters of his or her dissertation in order to declare candidacy. In the fourth year, students are required to take Economics 387M each semester to help them with their second major research paper. A suitably revised second-year paper, plus satisfactory papers produced in the writing seminars, can form part of the dissertation. A final oral defense completes the doctoral degree program.

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For More Information

Campus address: Bernard and Audre Rapoport Building (BRB) 1.116, phone (512) 471-3211, fax (512) 471-3510; campus mail code: C3100

Mailing address: The University of Texas at Austin, Graduate Program, Department of Economics, 1 University Station C3100, Austin TX 78712

URL: http://www.utexas.edu/cola/economics/

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Graduate Catalog | 2005-2007 Economics program | courses

Fields of Study

    Office of the Registrar     University of Texas at Austin copyright 2005
    Official Publications 16 Aug 2005