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Graduate Study

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Degree Requirements

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Appendix
of course abbreviations


Graduate Catalog | 2005-2007
College of Liberal Arts

Economics

to courses in ECO Economics »
to program in Economics »
 

Graduate Courses

The faculty has approval to offer the following courses in the academic years 2005-2006 and 2006-2007; however, not all courses are taught each semester or summer session. Students should consult the Course Schedule to determine which courses and topics will be offered during a particular semester or summer session. The Course Schedule may also reflect changes made to the course inventory after the publication of this catalog.

Unless otherwise stated below, each course meets for three lecture hours a week for one semester.

ECO | Economics

380. Research Course. With consent of instructor, may be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor and the graduate adviser in economics.

380K. Economic Development. Topics include theories of economic development; planning. With consent of instructor, may be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, six semester hours of upper-division coursework in economics, and six additional semester hours of upper-division coursework in social science or business.

Topic 1: Economic Development Theory.

Topic 2: Economic Development Topics.

Topic 3: Political Economy of Southeast Asia.

380L. Seminar in Economic Systems. Analyses of various types of economic systems, including comparative studies. With consent of instructor, may be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, six semester hours of upper-division coursework in economics, and six additional semester hours of upper-division coursework in social science or business.

380M. Regional Economics. Survey of theoretical and empirical literature related to location theory, regional development, regional disparities, growth and function of cities, and political economy of spatial planning. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, six semester hours of upper-division coursework in economics, and six additional semester hours of upper-division coursework in social science or business.

380N. Urban Economics. Provides an economic analysis of pressing urban problems such as poverty, housing, transportation, environment, and finance. With consent of instructor, may be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, six semester hours of upper-division coursework in economics, and six additional semester hours of upper-division coursework in social science or business.

381K. Seminar in Money and Banking. Topics include monetary policy and problems, theory of central banking, and money and banking history. The equivalent of three lecture hours a week for one semester. With consent of instructor, may be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

382L. Theories of Public Finance. Topics include public expenditure analysis and taxation. The equivalent of three lecture hours a week for one semester. With consent of instructor, may be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, and Economics 387L (Topic 1: Microeconomics I) or consent of instructor.

Topic 1: Foundations of Public Finance.

Topic 2: Empirical Public Finance.

Topic 3: Local Public Finance.

383K. Seminar in General Economic History. Same as History 383L. A historical study of economic development and economic policy. The equivalent of three lecture hours a week for one semester. With consent of instructor, may be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, six semester hours of upper-division coursework in economics or related history or government, and six additional semester hours of upper-division coursework in social science or business.

384K. Industrial Organization. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

Topic 1: Introduction to Industrial Organization.

Topic 2: Industrial Organization and Regulation.

384N. Resource Economics. Definition, measurement, production, and conservation of renewable and exhaustible resources; models of economic growth and resources; world distribution and consumption; United States resource policy. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

Topic 1: Natural Resource Economics.

Topic 2: Environmental Economics.

385K. Labor Economics. Analysis of the empirical and theoretical factors that influence labor markets. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

Topic 1: Introduction to Labor Economics.

Topic 2: Topics in Labor Economics.

387K. Monetary Theory. Theories, based on microeconomic foundations, covering such topics as the usefulness of monetary exchange, optimal central bank policy, the interaction of monetary and fiscal policy, and the role of financial intermediation in the macroeconomy. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

387L. Studies in Contemporary Economic Theory. With consent of instructor, may be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

Topic 1: Microeconomics I.

Topic 2: Macroeconomics I.

Topic 3: Microeconomics II.

Topic 4: Macroeconomics II.

Topic 5: Dissertation Seminar I.

Topic 6: Dissertation Seminar II.

Topic 7: Research Seminar.

Topic 10: Endogenous Economic Growth.

Topic 11: Computable General Equilibrium Theory.

Topic 12: Empirical Macroeconomics and Control.

Topic 13: Dynamic Macroeconomic Theory.

Topic 14: Banking and Financial Intermediation.

Topic 15: Advanced Macroeconomic Analysis.

Topic 18: Introduction to Marxian Economics.

Topic 19: Marxian Theories of Economic Crisis.

Topic 20: Autonomous Marxism.

Topic 21: Marxist Theories of Socialism and Communism.

Topic 24: Mathematical Economics.

Topic 25: General Equilibrium and Welfare Analysis.

Topic 26: Advanced Microeconomic Analysis.

Topic 27: Introduction to Game Theory.

Topic 28: Applications of Game Theory.

Topic 29: Economics of Uncertainty and Information.

Topic 30: Research Seminar. Offered on the credit/no credit basis only.

387M. Writing Seminar in Economics. The equivalent of three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

187N. Survey of Fields in Economics. Introduction to the questions, methods, and scope of research in different fields in economics. One lecture hour a week for one semester. Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

390L. Seminar in the History of Economic Thought. Survey and analysis of principal contributions and historical influences in the evolution of contemporary economic thought from the late eighteenth through the early twentieth century. With consent of instructor, may be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, and completion of core courses in economic theory or consent of instructor.

391K. Seminar in Latin American Economics. Selected economic problems in Latin America, with particular reference to current developmental policy in specific national economies. With consent of instructor, may be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, six semester hours of upper-division coursework in economics, and six additional semester hours of upper-division coursework in social science or business.

Topic 1: Seminar on the Mexican Economy. Same as Latin American Studies 391K (Topic 1: Seminar on the Mexican Economy).

Topic 2: Current Issues in Latin American Economics. Same as Latin American Studies 391K (Topic 2: Current Issues in Latin American Economics).

Topic 3: Latin American Economic Models. Same as Latin American Studies 391K (Topic 3: Latin American Economic Models).

Topic 4: Entrepreneurship and Development in Latin America. Same as Latin American Studies 391K (Topic 4: Entrepreneurship and Development in Latin America).

Topic 5: Privatization and Development in Latin America.

Topic 6: Inflation Stabilization and Liberalization in Latin America.

Topic 7: Latin American Marxism.

492L. Quantitative Methods in Economics. Topics include optimization methods, probability theory, and statistical inference. Four lecture hours a week for one semester. Economics 492L and 392M (Topic 1: Probability and Statistics) may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

392M. Seminar in Quantitative Economics. The equivalent of three lecture hours a week for one semester. With consent of instructor, may be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

Topic 2: Econometrics I.

Topic 3: Econometrics II.

Topic 4: Applied Microeconometrics.

Topic 5: Time-Series Analysis.

Topic 6: Advanced Econometric Theory I.

Topic 7: Advanced Econometric Theory II.

Topic 8: Mathematics for Economists I.

Topic 9: Mathematics for Economists II.

Topic 10: Economics of Control Theory.

Topic 11: Resource Systems Modeling.

Topic 12: Computational Methods in Economics.

Topic 13: Mathematical Programming.

Topic 14: Stochastic Control Theory.

Topic 15: Applied Macroeconometrics.

Topic 18: Econometrics III.

Topic 19: Probability and Statistics.

393. Seminar in Industrial Organization. The equivalent of three lecture hours a week for one semester. With consent of instructor, may be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

396. Studies in Economic History. The equivalent of three lecture hours a week for one semester. With consent of instructor, may be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, six semester hours of upper-division coursework in economics, and six additional semester hours of upper-division coursework in social science or business.

397. Seminar in International Economic Problems. The equivalent of three lecture hours a week for one semester. With consent of instructor, may be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

698. Thesis. The equivalent of three lecture hours a week for two semesters. Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Prerequisite: For 698A, graduate standing in economics, twelve semester hours of upper-division or graduate coursework in economics, and consent of the graduate adviser; for 698B, Economics 698A.

398T. Supervised Teaching in Economics. Teaching under the close supervision of the course instructor; weekly group meetings, individual consultations, and reports. Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and appointment as a teaching assistant.

399R, 699R, 999R. Dissertation. Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Prerequisite: Admission to candidacy for the doctoral degree and consent of the graduate adviser.

399W, 699W, 999W. Dissertation. Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Prerequisite: Economics 399R, 699R, or 999R.

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Graduate Catalog | 2005-2007 Economics program | courses

Fields of Study

    Office of the Registrar     University of Texas at Austin copyright 2005
    Official Publications 16 Aug 2005